VASK Forum (VW Audi SportKlub of NZ)

AUDI => Other Audi => Topic started by: AutoUnioNZ on December 23, 2015, 09:55:26 am

Title: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 23, 2015, 09:55:26 am
Hi Guys, I'm new to this group - I was wondering if there are any Auto Union DKW owners amongst you?  I have three of them...;

1957 DKW 3=6 F93 (two door) (Just imported into NZ)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2014-08-06%2009.12.18.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0873.jpg)

1958 DKW 3=6 F94 "Saxomat" (four door) (Resto project) (NZ New)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5280.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5079.jpg)

1959 Auto Union 1000 Standard Saloon
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11174785_10152717797902443_1170408126997872682_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11007730_10152717797477443_4383822643731849869_n.jpg)
Cheers,

Brendan Odell
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on December 23, 2015, 10:04:40 am
Nice collection........I always had a soft spot for these after being taken for a ride in one when the salesman was trying to sell it to my father in 1960.
He didn't buy it as it was a bit over budget and they wouldn't sell him one of the Juniors which was in budget as all the cars they had were apparently spoken for back in the days when new cars were not as readily available as today.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Mike1410 on December 23, 2015, 10:14:32 pm
Now I know whose green 1000 it was I saw driving up the hill into Onewhero earlier this year. Pity I have now moved, would have been nice to see it close up
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: wilco on December 24, 2015, 08:32:02 am
Nice group.
There's been a couple on Trademe recently, a red '60 and I think a yellow one.  Both pretty rough but complete with spares.

Also remember a few around the 'Naki in the '70's, recall they used same headlights as contemporary Beetles.

Welcome, good to see some older interesting stuff.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 24, 2015, 09:16:07 am
Thanks for the comments guys.  When the Saxomat four door is running it will be the only running car in NZ equipped with Saxomat clutch ( I believe the Auto Union 1000S Coupe at the Southward Museum in Paraparaumu is also a Saxomat - but it has not been run since the late 1970's).  It was sold NZ new at Moller Motors in New Plymouth.

Here are all the overhauled and new Saxomat parts to go into the 3=6 four door;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10479069_10152853590527443_1776842233036435136_o.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/22808_10152853590617443_2302197739362446586_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11137133_10152853590597443_5954120400796112141_n.jpg)

For those of you not familiar with Saxomat, have a read here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxomat

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/23saxo.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/saxomat_prosp1_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on December 24, 2015, 09:49:34 am
Interesting indeed....from an old junior driver

There is nothing like the sound of a 3 cylinder two stoke

Glad to see this post
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: the phantom on December 24, 2015, 10:41:28 am
a mate of mine at college ran around in one of these, rolled it at the bottom of Normandale (I think) hill in the Hutt and wore a full plaster neck brace collar for the next little while

always liked the look of these and particularly the mix of curves and square on the wagon, although I haven't seen one in the metal

(http://www.testdelayer.com.ar/pruebas/dkw-auto-union-universal.JPG)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2015, 01:22:42 pm
Very interesting - it is a pity there are now no stationwagons left in NZ - the last one was scrapped in Mapua a few months ago;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWMapua.png)


Here what they look like in better health;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/155368_1648628928080_1007659526_31788692_6789858_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Treffen21.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11021102_840019096036640_7981394809018682428_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3134944702_2_2_pH7O62ep.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/ebay341159.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_07_2.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on December 29, 2015, 01:30:23 pm
I really liked the coupe model..............was a white and orange one around my area in the early 60's.
That was an off white and dullish orange, great combination
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2015, 04:18:41 pm
There is only one roadworthy 1000S Coupe in NZ - a lovely car owned by Dean Salter in Auckland.  These were not sold new in NZ (I think - can someone correct me?) and any that exist are private imports - although they were very,very popular in other countries - Dean's car came from Mombasa in Kenya;

Here's Dean's car at Ellerslie Concours in Auckland in February this year

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_9349.jpg)

the colour scheme you are talking about was indeed very attractive here is an example (not in NZ, sorry) I think that orangey colour is called "Coraline";

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11951333_788916757886514_485838284734564441_n%201.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on December 29, 2015, 04:54:54 pm
Hey nice...

There is a guy here in Hamilton playing with 2 1000s motors joined longitudinally ...

Engines must be getting pretty rare as well
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: John Stone on December 29, 2015, 07:26:31 pm
Love this thread...
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2015, 08:53:31 pm
Very interesting about the 6 cylinder Deek engine - I'd be very interested to see the one in Hamilton!  The straight six Deek motor has been done in Brazil - it looks a vicious beast!  Here is a video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdNxXwE7V_M (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdNxXwE7V_M)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on December 29, 2015, 09:17:49 pm
Will see if I can find him...

Do you know if there are any juniors still around?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2015, 09:29:54 pm
 8) 8) 8) 8)  There are several more - but here are two in I have photos of

 There is this one in Hamilton;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMGP5088.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMGP5089.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMGP5090.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMGP5092.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMGP5093.jpg)

and this one in Invercargill (I think);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/337499_313330522039777_1397038097_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on December 30, 2015, 09:05:11 pm
Ahh the memories...thank you

Slight sidetrack from DKW's

Went from the Waikato to Auckland today and followed a NSU Ro 80 all the way

Perfect condition and and a pleasure to see such an innovation car being used...

Anybody here?

I would be interested to know if it was still a wankel
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: the phantom on December 31, 2015, 07:49:00 am
Ahh the memories...thank you

Slight sidetrack from DKW's

Went from the Waikato to Auckland today and followed a NSU Ro 80 all the way

Perfect condition and and a pleasure to see such an innovation car being used...

Anybody here?

I would be interested to know if it was still a wankel

was it a light blue RO80? if yes, it's still an NSU wankel, spoke to the owner in the Northcote shopping centre earlier this year, it had just had a respray, lovely cars, drove one in the eighties,  beautiful steering feel


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 31, 2015, 09:38:03 am
And here is another blast from the past...

The Canterbury DKW Distributor, Cashmere Garage, in Christchurch, circa 1959
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20Christchurch.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 08, 2016, 03:40:01 pm
My freshly imported '57 DKW 3=6 F93 arrived in Auckland a few days ago - very excited.  Now for the entry compliance! ;D ;D
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0321.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0322_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: RobClubley on January 08, 2016, 03:46:28 pm
Nice!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on January 08, 2016, 04:05:26 pm
That does look like a nice example.
Lucky there is no EPA here otherwise you may have a compliance problem with the emmissions
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 09, 2016, 11:13:50 am
 :D Thanks for the comments guys - it does need a little tidying to be really nice - but it goes very well.

Here's another two photos for you all - Grahame Smith in Tauranga has just about finished the restoration of his New Zealand new 1958 DKW 3=6 F94  (F93 = 2 door, F94 = four door);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/100_1695.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/100_1696.jpg)

 
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 10, 2016, 09:18:38 pm
And here is the 1960 Auto Union 1000S Coupe in the Southward Collection at Paraparaumu (somewhat sad looking).  This car is a Saxomat equipped car to my knowledge;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2224495592_a76fca3ba0_b.jpg)

These panoramic window models were considered pretty fast in their day - and quite stylish too.  As in the photo below - a full length "Golde" sunroof was also optional;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1961_19_2.jpg)

The Coupe was/is especially pretty when the rear windows were/are wound down - when these are wound down, the car can be driven at normal cruising speed (80-85 mph (yes, you read that right)) without undue drafts in the cabin;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/hi990048.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 13, 2016, 08:32:28 am
Driving the panoramic window near Port Waikato (also called the "Model 60") Auto Union 1000 (I have an AU1000, not AU1000S)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10422553_10152717797342443_6907496170136739695_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11156313_10152717797617443_185503797485864004_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1560381_10152717797887443_7425911822916934055_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11062364_10152717797352443_1049262668026515082_n.jpg)

In this factory photograph below of the Auto Union models for 1960, the Auto Union 1000 Standard (as the car above) can be seen at the 3 o'clock position.  There was a Coupe version of the 1000 also, seen at about the 7 o'clock  position.  These were not as popular as the 1000S, and did not sell as many cars as the 1000S;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1960_24_2.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 17, 2016, 05:12:19 pm
Not sure if anyone is actually still reading this topic - but here is a photo from our small gathering at the 2016 Ellerslie Concours in Auckland, for those interested;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12728948_10153261205882443_3071943513903503368_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on February 17, 2016, 05:27:25 pm
Yes, I am following with interest and also noticed a couple of pics of your display in some of the photos from the show.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on February 17, 2016, 07:01:43 pm
Yep I am a believer

Are there many convertibles left...

I seem to remember a blue one in Auckland that I think Eddie Wright owned at some point in time

Anyone?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: RobClubley on February 17, 2016, 08:08:16 pm
Yep watching with interest. :)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Worms on February 17, 2016, 09:53:19 pm
Also watching, interested, but nothing usefull to add (though that doesn't always stop me!)

I like aircooled VWs too, so this is right up my alley! Keep posting, as you wish - don't hold back  8)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: the phantom on February 17, 2016, 09:59:56 pm
me too!  I've always liked these beasties
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: le mans on February 18, 2016, 05:59:56 am
I've learned a lot from this thread. Keep it up please. Any info about the convertible at Concourse this year?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 18, 2016, 05:12:27 pm
Thanks all for your replies 8)!  Will keep posting then.... Ok about John Farmer's 1962 Auto Union 1000SP Roadster;

It is a pretty rare car - only 1640 roadsters were built in 1961-5.  Known affectionately in German as the "baby" Thunderbird ("schmalspur Thunderbird"), John's car came from Seattle in the USA in complete basket case condition.  John described the car as being completely "shagged" (not uncommon with DKW's - as they are pretty robust and reliable, people used to drive them, and drive them, and drive them with minimum maintenance until either the owner or the car dropped dead...)

John has been restoring this car for 16 years now, and is probably 95% done with the restoration.

These cars were handbuilt by Baur in Stuttgart - and were very expensive when new - DM10 750, when a VW Karmann Ghia cost DM 8750.  Their values are consequently high today.  There is no definite list of survivors of the roadster (many more of the hardtop version of the AU1000SP were produced and do survive) - I would estimate maybe 150 cars worldwide?

That said - they do stray into the market now and then - here is a nice one ;

http://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/auto-union/unspecified/1736485.html

here is an awful one;

https://www.classic-trader.com/au/cars/listing/dkw/1000/auto-union-1000-special-roadster/1962/34201

and a hardtop featured two days ago on "Bring a Trailer";

http://bringatrailer.com/2016/02/16/schmalspur-thunderbird-restored-1961-auto-union-1000-sp/

They were pretty cars - and Auto Union were by no means ashamed of the styling crib - and mention it openly, even today;

http://www.audi.com/corporate/en/company/history/models/auto-union-1000-sp-roadster-1964.html

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto-Union-1000Sp-Chevrolet-Thunderbird-Vergelich-07%201.jpg)

They were, considering their aerodynamics and power to weight ratio, good performers in their day - and their 90mph top speed was on par with small sports cars of the era.

Auto Union also used them as a powerful marketing tool and several were featured in various films of the time, and some rallied too.  Here is a photograph from the 1962 Auto Union calendar (incidently the car in the photograph still survives too, in South Africa);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_05_2.jpg)

Although there were no roadsters sold new in NZ - there were at least two hardtop 1000SP's sold here - here is one, which has since crossed the ditch to Ozzie;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%201000SP%20IMG_1524.jpg)

The remains of the second car (1000SP hard top)  are in a lock-up in Auckland - although sadly it is just a parlous collection of bits now.

There were a couple of other private imports - but these are now lost to the ravages of time...

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 18, 2016, 05:21:13 pm
Ahhhh and from Facebook someone shared a photo of one of those NZ-new 1000SP's in Christchurch in 1960;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000SP%20Christchurch.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 19, 2016, 03:07:04 pm
And another two have arrived in New Zealand - these two, a 1960 Auto Union 1000S Coupe and a 1958 Auto Union 1000 Coupe have arrived in Nelson, from Cape Town, South Africa in January 2016 !

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5490.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5405%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5466.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on February 19, 2016, 03:10:50 pm
Is there a breeding campaign?
I'm really pleased to see this
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 19, 2016, 03:48:40 pm
Mike de Vigne, who imported the two cars above, also has an immaculate NZ new 1962 1000S four door, previously from Auckland  (my apologies - the Trademe pictures are better than my own, which I took when Mike came to visit me at Auckland Airport) ;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/316896691.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/316897271.jpg)

and here when Mike came to visit - I took the 1000 to work that day;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MikedeVignefourdoor.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 19, 2016, 03:54:42 pm
Some of you may also enjoy this video of my friend Paul Markham in Australia taking his 3=6 four door out for a drive;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihCbVTqOmDM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihCbVTqOmDM)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on February 19, 2016, 05:00:43 pm
Nice potted history.
I must get out my Audi book and have a refresher on DKW
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 20, 2016, 09:06:53 am
OK - here's another type seldomly seen in NZ - the DKW Munga - there is one confirmed one that belongs to John Farmer in Whitianga (seen here at Ellerslie Concours 2015 with Dean Salter's ex- Kenyan 1000S Coupe);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000S%20en%20Munga.jpg)

However, there is/was a second one in Christchurch (the best reference I have is from 2008 - see the link below)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MungaCHCH.jpg)

(My reference is from this link; http://tanksforeverything.co.nz/gallery/displayimage.php?pid=233&theme=Choose%20a%20theme  )

Does anyone know what happened to the ChCh Munga?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 21, 2016, 09:28:26 am
Here is a nice example of the 1962 Auto Union 1000S two door saloon- at the Classics Museum in Hamilton (although it has what I think might be Triumph Herald hubcaps and painted bumpers) - the Coupe option was deleted for '62 in RHD cars (you could still have LHD '62 Coupe's) - so all of these '62  two doors have fixed rear windows.  I'm guessing this car would have been a private import - more than likely assembled by CDA in East London, South Africa, in the old Austin factory. The sign in the museum identifies it as a '60 - but the car is a '62 (the wider track rear axle, slat grille and escutcheon plates on the "C" pillars are  a dead giveaway).

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000S%20Museum%20Hamilton.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Untitled.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5453.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5454.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5455.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5469.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 22, 2016, 07:41:02 am
and today.... a blast from the past;

DKW 3=6 F94, Spring Invitation Trials (near Waiuku) - 1973   (This car is still alive and well and living in West Auckland, last I heard) (photograph courtesy Ross Cammick)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12688239_1733720636850673_3032228447581427707_n.jpg)

Brian Rule from Hamilton rallying his 1965 DKW F102 in the early 1970's (photograph courtesy Brian Rule);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BrianRuleF102.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 24, 2016, 12:34:18 pm
Took my '57 DKW F93 3=6 out for a drive yesterday afternoon- newly minted rego and warrant!
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/20160223_190147.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/20160223_190034.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12485983_10153211576772443_5195988809496791301_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 24, 2016, 12:37:37 pm
And another Kiwi Deek for you all - the 1000S Coupe in the World of Wearable Art in Nelson;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto-%20Union-19631.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on February 24, 2016, 12:42:05 pm
Looking at these pics reminds me why I liked them so much when they were new
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 24, 2016, 05:39:06 pm
Last of the Deeks - the RHD F102's sold 2nd best in New Zealand IN THE WORLD (1st was the UK) - I have included a good few factory advertisements and then two of the few existing F102's that survive in NZ.  Although they did not sell well worldwide due (in part) to a period bias against two strokes and Auto Union's own problems (sending them into the arms of Volkswagen in 1965) - it was an excellent car in reality, and those that owned them were very fond of them.  Of course - the addition of the Mercedes designed four stroke engine to this car created the Auto Union F103, which then very shortly after became the Audi F103 (the Audi 80) and the rest as they say...is history.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/293700_4290189174377_765401763_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_19_2_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2198862080_29de61274b_b.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_14_2.jpg)
This nice example in the Toy Museum at Wanaka
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F102wanaka_1.jpg)

This example previously owned by Brian Rule of Hamilton, now with John Farmer in Whitianga

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DSC00947.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 25, 2016, 01:21:44 pm
A sad sight - two Auto Union 1000S four doors abandoned near Balclutha
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWs%20Balclutha.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 25, 2016, 01:23:34 pm
For those of you unfamiliar with the lineage of Auto Union - here is the "Readers Digest" version;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw_union_logo.gif)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 25, 2016, 01:36:44 pm
Darling of Auto Union's advertising campaign in the '50's was German actress Romy Schneider;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw_36_f93_015.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/094de7210f752150a264e70e53245e07.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Romy_Schneider_mit_DKW_1957_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/romy%20dkw2_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/romy-dkw-pub-1957.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/romy-dkw-farbe-1957.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/pun16%202.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 26, 2016, 07:37:40 am
And then there was the other famous star (who actually owned and drove a 1957 DKW 3=6 Coupe herself), 50's sex kitten, Anita Ekberg, star of "La Dolce Vita";

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AnitaEkbergDKW.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 29, 2016, 12:59:56 pm
One of the big things about DKW's is that a lot of people that don't know them underestimate them somewhat - they can be very quick!  Here is a photo from a few years back, taken by a friend of mine in his 1958 1000 Coupe (well, he was driving, so the fellow behind him took the photo) winding the Deek up to 110 mph - that's 177 km/h folks!  I've done it myself in my own Deek (some years back)- it is possible - but not good for the crank and the very direct steering that the Deek has becomes light and sensitive at that speed.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/110mph_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 29, 2016, 01:12:19 pm
Right then, back to Kiwi Deeks - here the 1960 Auto Union 1000S four door previously owned by Graham Wiblin in Blenheim (he brought it from Dargaville) and sold it recently to a gent in Mapua. Graham still has a few of these 1000S four doors at his place  Apologies for the Trademe pics - they are the best ones I have of this car;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/429893649.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/429893710.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/429893717.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/429893668.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/429893661.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on February 29, 2016, 01:20:21 pm
They appear to have stood the test of time better than some of their contemporaries but is it a horror story on looking closer?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 29, 2016, 02:17:11 pm
Here is another rusty one - admittedly not a Kiwi Deek any longer, but an ex-Kiwi Deek, having been exported from New Zealand to Australia, and currently residing in a field in NSW......

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/058%201_1.jpg)

The DKW Junior was refined little car (in its manners) - with some advanced features for its day (like its big brother the F12), like inboard brakes - and some are still raced to this day;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MQ%20John%20Martin%201961%20DKW%20F12%20Junior.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 01, 2016, 11:22:08 am
Another Kiwi Deek - this 1961 Auto Union 1000S four door lives at Manapouri/ Te Anau;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3744697447_c138194fd5.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 01, 2016, 12:49:35 pm
Kenya 1959-
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4567843621_5be7d7fc42_z.jpg)

A 1956 DKW 3=6 F93 stops for fuel at "Sultan Hamud petrol station", 1959,  Nairobi- Mombasa road, Kenya . The road surface was called "murram".  Meeting an oncoming car usually threw up a blinding fog of red dust! Incidentally this car has been spotted in Kileleshwa, Nairobi recently;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/SultanHamud1959.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 02, 2016, 11:19:17 am
A series of DKW models (such as the 3=6) received the "Sonderklasse" moniker - "Sonderklasse" being one of those German words that does not translate entirely into English (much like the word "Gemütlichkeit") - the nearest equivalent being "Special Class" which would infer something above average or "special".  This was integral to DKW's marketing philosophy which (true in the '50's especially in this case)was to show that the DKW did not compete with the Beetle, and was a car in a higher market segment - that is being a small car, but more luxurious and very much faster.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/20516675929_8a36b98037_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 02, 2016, 11:25:50 am
Another Kiwi Deek - this attractive New Zealand new 1960 Auto Union 1000S four door was recently sold in Wellington - it is in my personal all time favourite colour combo for these - the ivory-white is called "Elfenbein" and the orange is called "Coraline";

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20Wellington.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 03, 2016, 07:40:52 am
Here is an interesting article for those interested from 1957 - originating from Australia, it shows the period impressions of the postwar Deeks very well (click on the images for bigger, readable versions of the images);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/img014%201_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/img015%201_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/img016%201_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: rambo_005 on March 03, 2016, 07:48:20 am
Loving this thread!

I'm a little confused about the name/s of this model though, is it 3=6, F93, 1000S or all of these? Cheers
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 03, 2016, 08:18:10 am
Oh yes.. there are a plethora of post-war models - we'll discuss each briefly;

There was the immediate postwar F89 series - of which the name "Meisterklasse" is associated (which was a very close copy of the Pre-war F9, with the pre-war 2 cylinder underpinnings) - none of these are in Australia or New Zealand, so I won't deal too much with them
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-F89-3gears-roslashntgen.jpg)

Let's start with the F91 series, which began production in 1953 and finished up in 1955 - these were the first production 3 cylinder DKW's and the first to carry the 3=6 name (there is one F91 in New Zealand and one in Australia both of them type 6603) - in the latter part of the illustration below you will see the F93, we'll talk more about that in the next post;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20F91-F93-F94-36_3_1.gif)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20F91-F93-F94-36_4%201_1.gif)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 03, 2016, 09:58:54 am
Actually Wikipedia lay the story out pretty well;

"The DKW 3=6 was a compact front-wheel drive saloon manufactured by Auto Union GmbH. The car was launched at the Frankfurt Motor Show in March 1953 and sold until 1959. It was also named as the DKW Sonderklasse and, following the factory project number, as the DKW F91. From 1958, by which year the car’s successor was already being sold and the earlier version had therefore become, in essence, a ‘run-out’ model, it was badged more simply as the DKW 900.

Apart from complications involving its naming, the 3=6’s notable features included its two-stroke engine and front-wheel drive layout along with the sure-footed handing that resulted.[2]

In a market segment increasingly dominated by the Volkswagen Beetle, the Auto Union contender also boasted class leading interior space, especially after the arrival of the four-door version, which featured a modestly extended wheelbase.

The DKW 3=6 "Sonderklasse" in due course replaced the DKW F89 "Meisterklasse", although the Meisterklasse remained in production until April 1954. In its turn, the 3=6 was succeeded by the more powerful Auto Union 1000, offered already from 1957."

Then, discussing the F93 and F94 (known also at that time as the "Big DKW 3=6")  - the F93 is a two door (also offered in several body forms) and the F94 is the four door (with the F94U being the 3 door stationwagon) - naming is further complicated by using chassis number pre-fixes as "Type" (F94 four door 3=6 car being the type 7009 for example);

As you can see from this photo - the F93 was a bit wider than its predecessor the F91;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/397095_3287263382796_1304012702_3353682_1619582592_n.jpg)

Here is the model range in the F93/4 series - ONLY the F94 (Type 7009) was offered in New Zealand for 1958 and 1959 (Click for larger);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Gen%20pg23.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Gen%20pg24.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Gen%20pg25.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 03, 2016, 11:00:18 am
But....now for '58 there is a curve ball!  For '58, the F94 continued unchanged, but the F93 received some changes - first of all the "standard" model (the 6803) was deleted and only the coupe version continued - now,with front hinging doors.  Then, the F93 could also be had as the new 1000 model, with the 44bhp 1000 engine.  You could therefore buy the 3=6 F93 coupe with the 900cc engine, or the 1000 F93 coupe with the 1000cc engine on the same showroom floor! The 3=6 kept its DKW badging and the 1000 was marketed as an Auto Union - the first car from the Auto Union stable sold as purely an "Auto Union". None of these options were available in New Zealand, but a couple did make it into Australia, and a few of these are still on the road.

Here is the new-for-1958 Auto Union 1000 F93
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Gen%20pg33_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto%20Union%201000%20Coupe%20HI090215_medium.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto-Union-1000-729x486-303baa88befa1d46.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10468015_679421318793220_516545978323937746_o.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto-Union-1000-729x486-bcf28d2fc901e502.jpg)

Here is one of those Aussie survivors, owned by my old mate Neil Padley on the Gold Coast (Neil loves this car and drives it regularly);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11062093_850849848338422_3959581154086373812_n.jpg)

For '58 the DKW 3=6 F93 coupe looked like this (the lack of chrome accent on the grille, DKW badging and retention of the ribbed bootlid were the most obvious cues);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2273800_dkw.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5836.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 03, 2016, 02:37:40 pm
That takes us into 1959, where the F93 1000 soldiered on, the F94 3=6 was soldiered on in sales (mostly unsold 1958 stock) during the first part of 1959.

Then, as 1959 progressed the F94U 3=6  was replaced by the F94U 1000 (F94U is the "Universal" or station wagon) - which really only meant that it was now an Auto Union 1000, and was the same car with all-chromed bumpers (from 1962), a 44bhp 1000 engine and a new name (these stayed as the Auto Union 1000 with the 44bhp engine for the rest of their production);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/roulax_1139919237_b20625_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/universal3.jpg)

The F93 Auto Union 1000 was dropped in favour of the 1960 model "Panoramic" Auto Union 1000 and 1000 series of 2 door sedan and coupes, these were out from August 1959.  The Auto Union 1000S was also released as a four door, replacing the DKW F94 (in essence it was an F94 with a bigger engine and a few changes) - only the 1000S four door was sold in New Zealand;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto%20Union%201000%20Script.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/cat8_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/484166_464564280248726_1164732927_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/cat15.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/b02133922b02d88e63fe0f2f162db1b0.jpg[img][img]http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4445357703_f13f602b00_o.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/b02133922b02d88e63fe0f2f162db1b0.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 07, 2016, 09:14:13 am
The line-up for 1960, thus included the 1960 model 1000 and 1000S's, on sale since late 1959 (we'll be dealing with Munga's, Schnellasters, Juniors, F12's, 1000SP separately).  The right hand drive 1000 models were not a success and were deleted late in 1960 (it continued in LHD though), the RHD range of these cars were, by late 1960, exclusively 1000S;

Here is the full line up for 1960;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20range%201960.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_06_2_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_03_2_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000S%20pub.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000%20S%20test.jpg)

Here are some of my own '60 1000S coupe I used to own 15 years ago in South Africa;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/006_6.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4085427698_87fc193c30_b.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/197919_5264082442_8474_n.jpg)
(Repaint and engine rebuild)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/CARS%2022.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F1000028.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F1000006.jpg)
(Before repainting)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F1000025.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on March 07, 2016, 10:13:45 am
Looks like yo have enough information and pictures to write your own book on these
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 07, 2016, 02:56:51 pm
Thanks Brian! :)

There were very few changes for 1961 - in Germany the Auto Union 1000S Coupe models (as one of the fast cars of its day) were pressed into service as motorway pursuit/patrol cars on the Autobahn.   The greatest fleet of these cars was in North-Rhine – Westphalia;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Sammler-Thorsten-Saatkamp-und-Kreispolizei-Steinfurt-erneuern-Zusammenarbeit-Polizei-ist-museumsreif1_image_630_420f_wn.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AUTOUNION%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/C41A6074_image_630_420f_wn.jpg)

In Germany, these were further highlighted by featuring these Auto Union police cars in a period TV crime TV series "Stahlnetz" .
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on March 07, 2016, 03:28:28 pm
What sort of engine life would you expect from one of these and at o'haul time was it just rings and bearings or what?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 08, 2016, 08:57:49 am
Well - typically, Deek engines would do 100 000 miles before needing overhaul - it is a very, very reliable motor;

That said - that figure is predicated on using the recommended 1:40 fuel/oil ratio - there were of course, those people who used to either forget to add oil (=crankshaft failure) or added too much oil (burnt pistons), which unfortunately hurt many engines and Auto Union's reputation... Auto Union also released the "Lubrimat" in late 1961 (which we'll discuss in the 1962 "edition" in the next post) - the Lubrimat was unfortunately not as reliable as hoped, and ruined Auto Union's reputation for high quality, reliable two-stroke powerplants (leading, in over-simplification of the story, the resurrection of the long-dead Audi name in 1965).  Most people today have the Lubrimat removed or disabled on the cars equipped with them.

Properly maintained and driven - they were/are an absolute joy to behold.

On a typical overhaul, the roller bearing crank would be the primary replacement item ( due to the work required to overhaul the sturdy little crank, exchange was, and still is, the best way to go on these).  Generally, one would, by 100 000 need to bore the block out the first oversize and also then replace the pistons and rings.

Normal engine servicing would entail only cleaning + gapping of spark plugs and checking the ignition timing, and adjusting the contact breakers, if necessary.

The crank looks like this (this is one of the new ones that can be had from Brazil);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/038_3.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 08, 2016, 09:24:43 am
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_00_1.jpg)

Big news for 1962 was the "Lubrimat" - it was touted, at the time, as a "sensation" - sadly though, its spectacular failure, ultimately marked the DKW name so much and turned the public against two-strokes forever, that Auto Union were sent into the arms of Volkswagen in 1965 - who took the only sane action available and promptly removed two strokes from the market immediately and the released the Auto Union F103, later rebranded as the Audi F103.

To quote my friend Fritz Eksteen

 " The DKW Lubrimat, was experimented with even before the Second World War. The design was not matured and the public demand was not there yet. From old literature it becomes clear that the mixing of the oil in the fuel tank was a very critical issue at low temperatures, because of the unwillingness of the oil to mix with the fuel. The “Shell-Mixer” inside the fuel tank was introduced during the early fifties, and it averted the premixing of the oil with some petrol in a can before the tank was filled. As we know it is a slow process, and time consuming and depended on the memory of the driver.

 The Lubrimat, as it appeared on the market at the end of 1961, metered the oil from a separate oil tank, according  to engine speed and engine loading (throttle position). The fuel and oil is mixed in the carburetor. From my own experience, this device provides an average oil to petrol ratio of about 1:40. This was measured over a few thousand kilometers on a DKW F12.

 Under very cold conditions, the oil in the oil tank is so viscous that the pump would not suck it into the suction side of the pump. Unfortunately for Auto Union, the European winter 1961/1962 was a very cold winter with plenty lubrication problems for their new lubrication system. This led to numerous engine failures, which really hurt the company at a time when public opinion started to turn against the use of two-stroke engines in motor cars.

  During 1964/5 Auto Union changed the system to include an oil heater underneath the oil tank, and a mixing chamber before the carburettor in order to improve the distribution of the oil in the engine, especially during cold weather conditions."


This what the Lubrimat looks like;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Lubrimat-1.jpg)

Here is an oil tank installed in the car;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Lubrimat.jpg)

In New Zealand too - Auto Union was hit with mega warranty claims - and worse, Kiwi customers had to wait months for replacement cranks (although provided under warranty), due the demand for cranks, shipping time etc...  it was tremendous disaster.

The '62 cars themselves though, were much revised over the '61 models (we're talking only about the 1000S here) had a larger flat boot, with the spare wheel moved to the side of the boot, disc brakes, bigger radiator, wider rear axle and a faux wood grain dash in the two door.  Disc brakes, especially, were a huge move to modernity.

New Zealand and the UK received the only 1962 four door models produced - none were sent to South Africa.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/cat9.jpg)


Here is my own 1962 car, overseas, on tour (sold this car 2010);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0281.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0384.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 09, 2016, 11:54:41 am
No major changes on the 1000S series - for 1963, aside from new wheel trims.  1963 was the last full year of production for the 1000S series (the 1000 was deleted late in 1962 in the face of flagging sales).

 Between January 1958 and July 1963, Auto Union produced 171,008 sedans and coupes of the 1000 and 1000 S. As of August 1959, the stationwagon version was known as the "1000 Universal" and, until November 1962 16.421 were sold of these.   Here is what the '63 cars look like;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11256854_1647195758846768_1942792252946500932_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3447.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1661367_414684235335660_1313194064_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3446.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/54123b5c46f9d2e6861477b49279b68c-6.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/800px-EM_Audi_5811.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 10, 2016, 02:43:21 pm
The end of the 3=6/1000S line represents the end of a story that effectively started in 1939 with the DKW F9.

That takes on to the next post-war model we are going to discuss - the Junior series (which incorporates the F12 too).  This model was quite popular in New Zealand, and quite a few examples were sold (unfortunately I don't know exactly how many, but the number does run in the hundreds);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Juniorbrochure.jpg)

Again, Wikipedia probably makes the best summary that is to be made;

"The DKW Junior was a small front wheel drive saloon manufactured by Auto Union AG. The car received a positive reaction when first exhibited, initially badged as the DKW 600, at the Frankfurt Motor Show in March 1957. The ‘Junior’ name was given to the (by now) DKW 750 in 1959 when the car went into volume production, but failed to survive an upgrade in January 1963, after which the car was known as the DKW F12. In addition to the saloon, a pretty ‘F12 Roadster’ (cabriolet version) was produced in limited numbers."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/pub%20us%20junior1_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3919743348_15fdf0e0b5_z.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11406948_1718436471717200_4346086161090782381_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1960-DKW-Auto-Union-Junior.jpg)

Here is a DKW Junior "in the wild" on the South Island in the late 1960's;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/549018_352651228168111_1105268518_n.jpg)

Also sold on the New Zealand scene was the slightly later variation of the Junior - the F11 Junior - here is a current car living in Invercargill;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/403158_313328732039956_470729032_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11406528_1718436421717205_4521801666055298634_n.jpg)

More on the F11;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3452145867_6d4bd25fd9_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on March 10, 2016, 02:57:26 pm
My father wanted to buy one of these but they wouldn't sell (Moller Motors); apparently they were all allocated or wanted to sell him something else.
This was when new cars were not readily available. Anyway that failed and he went elsewhere
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 11, 2016, 07:32:51 am
Pity that, Brian, the Junior was a nice car - quiet running and well mannered.

That leads us on to the F12 - which in turn - was an upmarket version of the F11 - again the Wikipedia summary is pretty good;

In 1961 the DKW Junior retailed for 4790 Marks.[2] It offered more luggage space and a wider cabin than the market leading Volkswagen Beetle, and customers willing to pay an extra 160 Marks for the optional heater had the advantage in winter of a car that warmed up much more rapidly than the Volkswagen with its air-cooled power unit.[2]

It is not clear whether the DKW Junior de Luxe, introduced in 1961, was intended to replace or to complement the original Junior which, in any case, was withdrawn in 1962. The Junior de Luxe had its cylinders bored out: total displacement was now 796 cc. Claimed power output was unchanged but the torque was marginally increased and the wheel size grew from 12 to 13 inches. Claimed maximum speed increased from 114 km/h (71 mph) to 116 km/h (72 mph).

In January 1963 the Junior De Luxe was replaced by the DKW F12.[3] Outwardly there was little change, but the C pillar became more angular and the engine was enlarged to 889 cc which was reflected by a claimed increase in output to 40 bhp (29 kW).[3] Apart from the engines, the big news from the F12 involved the brakes: the F12 was the first car in this class to be equipped with front disc brakes.

In August the Junior’s 796 cc engine reappeared in the DKW F11 which was in effect a reduced specification F12.

The DKW F12 roadster which appeared in 1964 extracted 45 bhp (33 kW) from its 889 cc three-cylinder engine, and this more powerful unit became available in the F12 saloon for a few months from February 1965.


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1509006_948626275175921_2313645803644186063_n_1.jpg)

The F12 has gained some popularity in recent years from customisers - "Cal-look" and "Rat" versions have appeared;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/socalDKWF121_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10273180_679419705460048_8929755667474781939_o.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/socalDKWF122_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/socalDKWF12.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12032077_10154213392722892_5212096602443502270_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12003020_10154195802077892_1039722972168055567_n.jpg)

Due to the Daimler Benz ownership, Auto Union products were also distributed by Mercedes-Benz delaerships in many countries.  I recall a story from South Africa where a particularly keen salesman sold a little old lady a new F12 by telling her that as a high quality little car (which is what it was), it was, essentially, a small Mercedes (it was absolutely not that!) !  To appeal to the Mercedes buyer looking for something smaller, and to inject some local content into the car, South African F12's all came with leather upholstery;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11263030_999632526715554_8415024354843802371_o.jpg)

The F12 did carry excellent specifications for a small car of its day - disc brakes were still quite a rarity on production cars, let alone smaller ones in the mid '60's.  They were well loved - I knew one Gentleman, Mr Robert Pace, who bought this F12 as his first car, when it was new in 1964, and drove it until he passed away in 2014 - still taking extended tours of several thousand kilometers until that time;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/veteraanmotors2-3.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 11, 2016, 08:09:40 am
The F12 was a capable and popular competition car - they were (and are) raced and rallied worldwide.  The engine had more development potential than the earlier 3=6 and 1000 series, and was developed as such, by people such as Albrecht Mantzel and raced by Wolf Dieter Mantzel (and others). 

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/default.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2026728_1_xio-fcmsimage-20110428190309-006005-4db99dcd74039.a56fb945c99ea3efab09d7e7c5e5032c_20110428.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/6133662579_0474398ca1_b.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 11, 2016, 08:25:20 am
Then the very pretty DKW F12 Roadster -  there is a charming period advertisement here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8-_yEISXm4

and an current appraisal of the driving experience of one here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QC1aILDzE5I

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/460103392_5993aee477.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5091_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/CLASSIC_RIDE_Oldtimer_Magazin_bei_Sky_DKW_F12_Roadster_bei_MOTORVISION_TV_2.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 15, 2016, 11:46:28 am
That takes us onto one of DKW's most famous and most loved cars - the DKW Schnellaster - also known as the parent of all minivans - unfortunately only one ever made it to Kiwi shores, and it survives - but we will discuss this remarkable vehicle, and what it meant in the evolution of vans and people movers, as we think of them today, in the next few posts ;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/28994.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11699053_1606950232898193_5239525736376877298_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10415655_709026645800930_7384120904932759973_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11873748_881538011916420_6094715943875525560_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-schnellaster-9_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/schnell%20milch.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI090255_large.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3452145489_e5ea26e732_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/9458371212_6b672b0790_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 15, 2016, 02:24:57 pm
"What are the defining characteristics of the modern mini-van? Front wheel drive? Transverse engine? Front wheels set forward of the passenger cabin? A one-box design with a short and sloping aerodynamic hood? A flat floor throughout, and flexible seating and transport accommodations? And which one was the first? Renault Espace or Dodge Caravan? How about the DKW Schnellaster (Rapid Transporter)? It had them all, in 1949. Time to give it a little overdue recognition"

This article lays the full story out;  http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/03/the-mother-of-all-modern-minivans-1949-dkw-schnellaster/

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20salon%20geneve2.jpg1..jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 16, 2016, 11:03:19 am
Not only was the Schnellaster (in three cylinder form) quicker than its competitor, the VW Kombi, but it also had the advantage of a low rear door - which was very good for loading heavy items, such as pianos.  In fact, many Schnellasters were used in the piano moving trade.  They were renowned for being able to carry very heavy loads.

Despite the aforementioned advantages over the Volkswagen, they also had disadvantages - and ultimately the VW won out -  the Schnellaster was primitive in certain areas, such as the under bonnet fuel tank, which (Shock, Horror!) was above the drivers knees, and had no fuel gauge (it had to dipped).  The seats were not very comfortable, and the unlined cabin was very noisy once underway. It did have a "face" though and was a car with personality!

That said - surviving Schnellasters are getting more valuable all the time - and unbelievably one sold in the USA (admittedly concours) for over $120 000 US some years ago - others, like this one http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2013/12/24/one-of-two-restored-dkw-schnellaster-kastenwagens-in-the-u-s-heads-to-auction/ have been near the $60k mark.  There are a fair few survivors ( a number of probably 2-300 RHD vehicles and maybe 500 LHD) - restoration projects and runners.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/H1118-L81220006.jpg)

The one Kiwi survivor is an F800/3 model and belongs to Brian Rule and currently resides in Hamilton - awaiting restoration.  It is a RHD example, originally from South Africa, having made its way to NZ in the early 1960's in the hands of South African immigrants.  Unfortunately I do not have a photo of it.

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 16, 2016, 11:09:19 am
This two cylinder example lives across the Ditch in Australia;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Schnellaster.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 16, 2016, 11:38:17 am
"From 1955 to 1962, DKW built a limited-production electric version of its Schnellaster Kastenwagen delivery van, targeted to niche customers. Just 100 examples were assembled, and only two are known to survive today."  Audi restored one stunning example for themselves, see this link with the full story;

http://blog.hemmings.com/?p=394641

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI150003_large.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 16, 2016, 12:43:52 pm
And the Schnellaster has not been exempt from the customising sector either...
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/903c3ddece09d1dc0d86e1e712b0057f.jpg)

(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y135/boombastico/chop.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 17, 2016, 09:28:02 am
The variety of body styles fitted to this very versatile chassis were truly bewildering.  With the virtually unbreakable 3 cylinder engine (provided you got the fuel oil mix right!),  it was a good combo - a bit slow if anything, but even when howling to get the job done, it got the job done.

My favourite is the ute version;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/08citpschnellasterbakkie%201.jpg)

Then there was the Flintridge "Caravan" (the story of Flintridge and DKW is another story in itself!);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-fli2.jpg)

The Westfalia Camper;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-1000-Wohnmbobil-Westfalia.jpg)

and innumerable homemade versions (here is one constructed by welding two Schnellasters together, end to end, owned by Dutch collector and DKW afficionado Sipke Sipkens!) ;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11781771_667139443423470_1712835787026600105_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/532743_136531386484281_955962957_n.jpg)

another Flintridge (this one modified to incorporate a Corvair flat 6 engine!);
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/255_5511-em_blog.jpg)

The size of the Schnellaster is here compared to the 1000S - seen here in South Africa is Tjasse Biewenga's F800/3, with the late Johny Nel's 1962 1000S (now driven daily by his daughter Charlene Ferns) - this 1000S has done over 1 million km since 1962!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11401424_856868294399734_5958244861039530301_n_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 17, 2016, 10:44:49 am
On the subject of South African Schnellasters - here is the F800/3 of Louis Gerber of Pretoria - it looks innocent enough, but it has a tuned 1000S engine fitted, with a 1000S gearbox - giving it enough speed to break the local 120 km/h speed limit (Louis has the speeding tickets to prove his point!).  The major issue from this modification was overheating - which was solved with a custom made exhaust expansion chamber and electric fan.  Louis uses this as his daily driver;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/08citpschnellasterbus.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 18, 2016, 07:16:38 am
Many project Schnellasters are out there today, here is one from some recent classifieds (overseas);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1413305911541910475image.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1413305902377754862image.jpg)

(This one is a survivor in Zimbabwe)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10703615_506214499481531_7232595539234858858_n.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 18, 2016, 11:32:47 am
Before continuing with production Auto Union/DKW cars any further - I thought I might discuss an interesting "special".  There were many, many DKW based "specials" over the years and I'll try to tell you all about them in the next while - here is a particularly interesting one;

"The UK’s DKW importer in the 1950s, AFN Limited - better known as builders of Frazer Nash sports cars - constructed this prototype two-seater sportscar on a right-hand drive DKW Sonderklasse saloon chassis in 1954, hoping to persuade the German manufacturer to put the car into production. Clothed in elegantly streamlined bodywork reminiscent of the Frazer Nash Mille Miglia, the prototype retained the Sonderklasse’s 896cc, three-cylinder, two-stroke engine and four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox.
Registered ‘5 DMP’, the prototype was entered in the 1955 Tourist Trophy at Dundrod - in International Class G, number ‘48’. The car was initially to be driven by works driver Bill Smith but following his tragic death was driven by Ken Rudd and Cecil Yard. It was recorded as buzzing merrily around until at a pit stop the crew filled the fuel tank with neat petrol, instead of the petroil mixture required by two-strokes, and the DKW engine seized at Jordan’s Cross. 
For several years ‘5 DMP’ disappeared from view, though it is believed that for a considerable period it was stored at the AFN works. Brian Emblin, a senior DKW technician at AFN Ltd, has recalled working on ‘5 DMP’ at the factory and some race tracks, and that a customer of AFN, Frank Capeman, borrowed the car for the odd race or rally.
‘5 DMP’ resurfaced in the early 1970s when it was retrieved from Birmingham by John Aldington, the then Managing Director of AFN Ltd and currently the chief Frazer Nash archivist. In 1980 AFN at Isleworth undertook a complete restoration of the car, after which it was retained in the collection there. AFN registered the car in 1985, retaining the registration mark ‘5 DMP’ when it was subsequently re-registered ‘JSJ 462’. In 1996 the car was sold by AFN to a dealer, but not registered in his name, and put into storage until 2003 when it was purchased by the current owner. Restored to original specification over the course of the succeeding two years."


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/535134_1016494065055808_2049321199305356018_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1917800_1016492945055920_2230072206342737855_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FN-DKW-0.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 19, 2016, 08:09:35 am
Always better to have this;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1506379_664456920252284_581071067_o.jpg)

than this (if you can help it)!;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10541885_10204065663977911_1156556833756257659_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 19, 2016, 08:40:21 am
OK - moving along smartly - lets talk about the beautiful DKW Monza;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/pun19.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1074372_599158276782149_840662316_o.jpg)

I hate to copy and paste from Wikipedia too much - but the info is accurate and well summarised;

"The DKW Monza was a sports car built on an Auto Union DKW base. Named after the world-famous Italian Grand Prix circuit, the car set five world records in 1956.

After the series of wins by the DKW 3=6 'Sonderklasse' in European touring car racing and rallying in 1954 and 1955, two racing drivers started to develop a sporty body for the successful model. Günther Ahrens and Albrecht W. Mantzel designed a record-breaking car on the basis of the 3=6, incorporating an extremely lightweight plastic body built at Dannenhauer & Stauss in Stuttgart, Germany.

The complete vehicles were first built by Dannenhauer & Stauss in Stuttgart, then by Massholder in Heidelberg and lastly by the company Robert Schenk in Stuttgart.

Fritz Wenk had to discontinue his Monza production in 1958 after the new Auto Union 1000 Sp was launched in 1957 and Auto Union refused to provide additional new chassis for his production of the Monza.

In December 1956 a team consisting of two Germans and two Swiss spent alternating times driving a DKW Monza around the racecourse at Monza, Italy. With an average speed of 140 km/h (87 mph), the team of drivers set five international records.

The glass-fiber reinforced polyester coupe body had a smaller aerodynamic resistance due to its rounded frontal area and low profile. This made it much faster than the standard DKW. Like all DKWs of those days, the Monza had a compact chassis, 1.61 metres (63 in) wide and 1.35 metres (53 in) high, with an average weight of about 780 kilograms (1,720 lb). This was 115 kilograms (254 lb) less than the DKW 3=6 limousine (4-door. Sedan).

The two stroke three produced a power stroke with each rotation of the crankshaft, unlike a four stroke which produced a power stroke with every other rotation of the crankshaft. With the complete rotation cycle of the three-cylinder engine, DKW people thought of it as a “6” of a six-cylinder machine. Consequently, the use of the emblem, “3=6”.

The three-cylinder engine, displacing 900cc and producing 40 hp (30 kW), allowed the 3=6 sedan model to reach 125 km/h (78 mph). It could accelerate from 0–100 km/h in 31 seconds. With the same engine, the Monza could reach 140 km/h (87 mph) and accelerate from 0–100 km/h in 20 seconds.

Conflicting reports as to the actual numbers built has been circulated. One of the reasons for this is that there was never an accurate record kept. With several companies making them at various times it was difficult to maintain a good production record. Therefore, it was very difficult to suggest a final production report on the actual number of Monzas built. Making it more difficult was the additional used vehicles at the company and Monza kits that were sold to the public. The number of produced Monzas varies between 230 - 240, (Theoretically possible, according to letters of Wenk to Massholder and Schenk and dealers, but not verified.) to 155 to 73. According to the realistic number of items appear to be about 70 - 80 . Today there are still about 50 cars.
"
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Prospekt_DKW_Monza_-_Titelbild.jpg)

Have a look at this period advertisment - just let those figures settle in for a minute.....outstanding achievement in a car in the 1950's - especially one of such a small displacement engine;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/rekordplakat_neu.jpg)

The Monza, while not beautiful in a conventional sense, had its charm and contained some very appealing details;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_Audi_Dialoge_Technologie_2012_2_10_RostundLogis_Img_01.jpg-c57c53debe-1214.jpg)

There are also some Monza's fitted, not with the 3 cylinder powerplant that had given the world record performance at Monza, but with the very potent 1300cc Muller-Andernach DKW V6 - which produced 85bhp in standard form (and 100 or more with tuning) - this remarkable engine weighed only 80 kg!;

(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d171/arthurdaley/DKWMonzaSchenk102.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Muller-Andernach_2_2.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: le mans on March 19, 2016, 11:58:14 am
That is gorgeous. These cars have completely different lines to anything Audi has produced and seemed to be incredibly progressive in terms of technology. What a shame they got swallowed up. I keep thinking you must have run out of source material by now, but then you conjure up some more! Great thread.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on March 19, 2016, 12:02:23 pm
+1

I've learned a whole lot more from this than was covered in my Audi book
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 19, 2016, 04:29:03 pm
Thanks for the comments guys - its your input that keeps me going and adding contributions!

Auto Union (and Audi, as it were) - has an extremely fascinating history - and some of the most interesting parts are not confined to Europe.

Before I go on with more German Production Auto Unions , I thought I would discuss two Argentinian and Brazilian models - both styled by Fissore (or, more correctly, Carrozzeria Fissore, an Italian coachbuilder located in Savigliano, near Turin) , but somewhat different cars;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Emblema_fissore_1966.jpg)

First, the Argentinian;

"In Argentina the 1000 was manufactured under license by IASFe (Industrias Automotriz de Santa Fe) between 1960 and 1970, in the city of Sauce Viejo, Santa Fe. The lineup consisted of the 2- and 4-door sedan, the 3-door Universal estate (station wagon), and Carrozzeria Fissore drew the Coupé and Spyder "1000 SE" on the basis of German "1000 Sp", but this time more elegant and it departed from the visual appearance of the Ford Thunderbird, the "Fissore Coupé" stood out with one piece front bumpers and longer wrap around bumpers in back, an alternate roof line, side louvers in the front fenders between the front wheel cut outs and doors ornated with chrome strips and an elegantly appointed interior, limited numbers of the coupé were built and are highly sought out by collectors. Licensed productions of the Coupés and Spyder where also assembled in Spain.

The Cupé Fissore had many famous owners (Julio Sosa, César Luis Menotti and others).
"

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/43171-dkw-fissore-1963.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/43171-dkw-fissore-1963-g.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/43171-dkw-fissore-1963-b.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/81438-auto-union-fissore-64.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/59818-autounion-fissore-1000sp-e.jpg)

Julio Sosa, widely considered the greatest Tango singer of all time, was famously killed in a DKW Fissore in 1964 – ‘Sosa's fame acquainted him with sports cars as well. He had numerous accidents during the early 1960s, mostly as a result of speeding. He was behind the wheel of a DKW Fissore coupé when, in the early hours of November 25, 1964, he crashed into a roadside hazard light on Buenos Aires' Figueroa Alcorta Avenue, killing him instantly at age 38.  Some 25 000 people attended his funeral.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Sosa.jpg)

This is the car Sosa was killed in;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto-union-dkw-fissore-01.jpg)

Now the Brazilian ;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/LogoVemag.jpg)

"From 1956 to 1967, DKW cars were made in Brazil by the local company Vemag (Veículos e Máquinas Agrícolas S.A., "Vehicles and Agricultural Machinery Inc."). Vemag was assembling Scania-Vabis trucks, but Scania Vabis became an independent company in July 1960. The original plans were to build the Candango off-roader (Munga), a utility vehicle and a four-door sedan, called Vemaguet and Belcar respectively. The first model built was the 900 cc F91 Universal but the Belcar and Vemaguet names were applied later.

In 1958, the F94 four-door sedan and station wagon were launched, in the early 1960s renamed Belcar and Vemaguet. The company also produced a luxury coupe (the DKW Fissore) and the off-road Munga (locally called Candango). In 1960 Vemag cars received the larger one-litre, 50 PS (37 kW) engine from the Auto Union 1000"


First shown in 1962,  the Fissore was finally put on sale in 1964. It was beautiful and very expensive; It had only two doors, but offered ample internal space (6 seats) and a lot of thanks to the visibility and narrow columns. It was a pioneer in offering the LUBRIMAT - mechanism that automatically blended oil to gasoline (with 1 liter of oil could be run up to 1,000 km). The large boot lid opened from the line of the bumper. It had its less desirable features - because of poor ventilation the windscreen fogged with ease and excess lead loading (to correct defects of the body) increased the car's weight. The engine had a higher compression ratio and (according to Vemag) yielded 60 HP of power. But the car's performance was lower than expected ( it weighed 70 kg more than the Belcar). The brakes, drums all round, suffered somewhat to slow the car in stretches of mountain descents .

In 1966  the Fissore had the boot lid shortened, which meant to use the least amount of lead on the rear panel. Thus, the fuel filler cap migrated from rear fender behind the licence plate in the newly created rear.  The boot lid, now a smaller size made ​​it difficult to move luggage, but in return helped the Fissore to lose weight. . The instrument panel finally received vents at the ends, reducing fogging of windscreen. Seats (then lined in velvet) were also offered in leather that matched the color of the body . Vemag designed and built a prototype of a Fissore 4 door, but it was never released.  At the end of the year the 1967 models were launched and received Fissore's elegant horizontal and the largest and most engaging tail lights, which were also fitted in the Vemaguet . At last, 12 volt electrics were introduced!

The DKW-Vemag Fissore represented an attempt by Vemag to enter the world of more "sophisticated" cars, and was 25% more expensive than the four door "Belcar" saloon. 2638 units were produced between 1964 and 1967.   There are 65 known survivors today.  In total DKW Vemag produced a total of 115,009 cars of all models ( but we can talk more about Vemag later)

Finally, it is interesting to note that all Brazilian Fissore models relied on the Lubrimat, an automatic system for lubrication of two-stroke engine. The Fissore, incidentally, was the first model of Vemag equipped with this system.

Here is the Vemag DKW Fissore (these were available from new with Saxomat automatic clutch also);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/61b3803481891f4491f58ef327b393dd.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fissore-001.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fissore60.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fissore%203.jpg)

The rear of the 1965 Fissore;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Traseira2_fissore_66.jpg)

The contract between Fissore Fratelli and Vemag had a duration of 10 years (going by the end of 1971). In addition to creating a new product (the 2 door sedan Fissore, presented at the Motor Show in 1962 and effectively marketed from 1964), provided for a sedan 4 door ; Next , a station wagon , and finally a convertible (developed for Argentina) which were produced about 50 units.  As Vemag was taken under Auto Union control again,  its financial difficulties became that of Vemag (Vemag's finances had always been left alone, without support or injection of funds from Auto Union AG)  and Volkswagen incorporation sealed the fate of DKW in Brazil ... So , the contract was terminated, and the links of Fratelli Fissore to the domestic market were closed there. The process was thus aborted for the emergence of the "stationwagon" scheduled for the Motor Show in 1967 .

The prototype stationwagon;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/PeruaDKWFissore.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 21, 2016, 11:04:30 am
And now onto arguably the most glamourous of the post-war Auto Union cars - the "Schmalspur Thunderbird" - the Auto Union 1000SP;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/au.jpg)

"Appearing in 1958 was the Auto Union 1000 Sp, a low-slung two-seater sports car that was produced for Auto Union by the Stuttgart coach builders, Baur. The fixed-head version was joined in 1961 by a cabriolet. Adorned with tail fins, the stylish modern look of the car gave rise to the "baby Thunderbird" (schmalspur Thunderbird) soubriquet in the press, and belied the fact that it was, under the skin, another Auto Union 1000, albeit one with an increased compression ratio and a claimed maximum of 55 bhp (41 kW) to place on the road. The 1000 Sp was lower but not (assuming only two people were in the car) significantly lighter than the standard-bodied saloon: a claimed maximum speed of 140 km/h (87 mph) nevertheless put its performance at the top of the range. It would prove to be the last open top car produced by the company until the Audi 80 cabriolet in 1994."

"The Auto Union (DKW) 1000Sp coupe was joined by a roadster version in 1961. It looked even more glamorous than the coupe, an aspect stressed by the factory by advertising it with the help of beauty queens and movie stars.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_11_2.jpg)

The 1000Sp wasn't only pretty on the exterior, it had an interior to match. The interior was well finished with a variety of chrome accents, an almost monumental steering wheel in ivory or black colored plastic, elaborate dials and switches, full carpetting and adjustable front seats. A small rear bench was included as well, but could only be occupied by very small children.

The 1000Sp roadster was equally as expensive as the coupe. It may have been an extravagant price for a small car with such humble origins, but if you look at the detailing and finishing of this car its quite clear that it couldn't have been a cheap car to produce.
To invoke a more upper class association the DKW name was temporarily substituted by Auto Union in 1958. This only applied to the 1000 cc models and with the end of this range of models in 1965 also the Auto Union name disappeared for good.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_21_2.jpg)

A nice aesthetic touch of the 1000Sp roadster was that its hood completely folded away into the bodywork. This way the crisp-cut lines of the model weren't spoiled by a lump of fabric sitting on top of the rear deck.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962_DKW_1000_Sp_roadster_r3q.jpg)

Not only the price of the roadster was similar to that of the coupe, also the technology underneath was identical. It had the same measurements and only weighed 30 kg less. Top speed was also 140 kph.
During the lifespan of the 1000Sp only small changes and improvements were made. Most noticeable were the introduction of an automatic oil pump for mixing the fuel for the 2-stroke engine in 1961 and front disc brakes in 1963.

The end for both the 1000Sp coupe and roadster came in April 1965. Only 1640 roadsters were sold, which now makes it the most valuable classic of them both. The 1000 cc models were replaced by the DKW F102 in 1964, which was to be the last DKW model. DKW had been bought by Volkswagen from Daimler-Benz in 1965. Volkswagen immediately fitted the F102 with a Daimler-Benz designed 4-cylinder 4-stroke engine and named it the Audi, another brand from the rich Auto Union history. The 2-stroke DKW F102 was taken out of production in spring 1966 and Audi went on to become Volkswagens premium brand it is today, built on the foundation laid by DKW.

In a way you can consider the 1000Sp as the swan song of DKW, the epitome of a long history of making 2-stroke front wheel drive cars. Not only does it look good, it's also a special part of automotive history, a worthy conclusion to the 2-stroke era (though 2-stroke engines kept rattling away in Eastern Germany for decades thereafter). The 1000Sp is a gem of typical European engineering in a disguise of American forward thinking and special to anyone interested in automotive history.
"

Of these 1640 roadsters, there is indeed one in New Zealand, in the hands of John Farmer formerly of Auckland (now Whitianga) - John has spent 16 years restoring this car, bought as a wreck from the USA.  I have posted photographs of it on other pages in this forum.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_05_2_1.jpg)

(This one sold to Peru!)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1964_03_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_19_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/pub%201000Sp%20anglais%201.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/au5.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/au3.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/au2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto_union_1000_sp_cabriolet_001.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10592664_1016519251719956_2717422527731831313_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/230.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000Sp%20teintier3.jpg)

And this is the Kiwi roadster;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12728948_10153261205882443_3071943513903503368_n.jpg)

Now, of real interest is that some SP's were also fitted with the 1300cc DKW- Muller-Andernach V6 two-stroke engine (we discussed this engine a little earlier as fitted in the 1000SP's predecessor, the Monza;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/imagegallery-43474-53e496492e55a.jpg)

You can hear the glorious sound of one here (the only recording I've ever heard);

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lwm4k4XwIjk

and here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qr9srT2b5xY&ebc=ANyPxKql1n5WVXlW5itpsA_3c0e9RN97tgDteHg3aA7gDsWZ3fNMv_qGxSHN4-MVdvbnwYldVAUr5z5SUXzyMp-qcsXZqqLkbQ

Such beautiful lines this car has!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto-union-1000-sp-heckansicht-66482.jpg)

Just outside Cape Town - note Table Mountain in the background;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/roulax_1139919363_auto_union_1000_sp_turq.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 21, 2016, 02:44:24 pm
A couple more of the 1000SP;

It has lots of nice details, and in my opinion was rather like the Mercedes 190SL, in that it was a car to be seen in, rather than a sports car per se (my opinion only);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Audi-A4-Cabrio-vs-Auto-Union-1000-Sp-Roadster-495x330-cfeea8746670a935.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/imagegallery-43474-53e4964a106af%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/audi_1000sp.jpg)

They were raced too;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/der-auto-union-1000-sp-lief.jpg)

Here a couple more;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1959_08_2_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto_union_1000_sp_coupe_002.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1959_11_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1959_16_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1959_24_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_02_2_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/9d77512b498f74ed39fb3e6198ff3272.jpg)

and if I have convinced you about this lovely car, here are some you can buy;

http://www.preloved.co.uk/adverts/show/612154017/1965-auto-union-1000-sp-roadster.html?utm_source=newsnow&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=trovitcars

https://www.classicdriver.com/en/car/auto-union/1000/1959/348232
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: the phantom on March 26, 2016, 04:43:38 pm
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000Sp%20teintier3.jpg)


looks like an illustration from TinTin
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 04, 2016, 12:16:17 pm
I've been a bit busy of late - so its been a while since I wrote an update - here is the DKW Munga;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Gelandewagen-Munga.jpg)

"The Munga was an extraordinary four wheel drive, jeep and utility type vehicle.
It was really a cross between a jeep and a car.
The word MUNGA is an acronym for the German "Mehrzweck UNiversal Geländewagen mit
 Allradantrieb" which translates to multi-purpose, universal, cross country car, with all wheel
drive.
It was a favoured vehicle used by the West German Border Guards during the Cold War,
who used it to monitor their side of the Berlin Wall, whilst their East German comtemporaries
on the other side were using Trabant Kubels.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10548816_679420432126642_6153548789603549097_o.jpg)

How it came about is interesting.
After WWII the West German Government initiated a competition for German marques,
Borgward, Porsche, and Dkw with the objective of producing an alternative, home grown
alternative to the Land Rovers they'd used before the War.
The Land Rover was really the only viable 4x4, apart from the American Willys Jeep, both
of which must have been hugely expensive for foreign countries to buy.
Dkw got the contract and this was the start of what would become the Munga.(wasn't named
the Munga until 1962)
The Munga was made in 3 main variants, Munga 4, 6, & 8 respectively which referred to the
number of seats each model provided.
All Munga's were identical apart from the back seat configuration which determined whether
it had individual seats or  bench type variants as in the 6 and 8 versions.


Production started in October 1956 and ended in December 1968, with almost 47,000 having
been produced.
It was first unveiled to the Public at the Frankfurt Motor Show in late 1957, and was
at first only available to Government Forces and Services, such as the Fire department.
It was very popular with the Bundeswehr German Army and many other forces within Nato
including the Dutch Army who bought it in large numbers.


It was available to the general public from late 1957 and was priced at 9,500 DM ( approximately
$2300 at the time, which would have made it pretty expensive). Nonetheless it was popular with
farmers and forestry workers and those whose work demanded a tough, no frills vehicle that
would go anywhere in all weathers and in any terrain.

It shared the 900cc, 3 cyl, 2 stroke engine that was used by the Dkw 3=6, although the
torque settings were arranged to suit the off-road capabilities of the Munga.
It was front wheel drive, engine in the front and had a top speed of 50mph.
It was water-cooled and had a 4 speed gear box.

They had a soft-top roof and no windows and were extremely basic vehicles.
They were also remarkably tough and resilient and stood up to all kinds of abuse and
hardships. The 2 stroke engine ensured easy starting in even the coldest of Winter climes.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MungaPretoriaImpala.jpg)

The Munga sold particularly well in South Africa and parts of South America where roads
were extremely poor. It was sold in North America as the "Bronco"

The Royal Netherlands Army had intended the Munga as a replacement for the 1956 M39A1 NEKAF Jeep, but the type caused so many problems that it was removed from front line service prematurely in 1970. The M38A1 NEKAF Jeeps, that had been stored in mobilization compounds for reserve units, were re-issued to operational units - where they remained in use until 1995.

The Munga was also built in São Paulo, Brazil, by DKW-Vemag, where it was called DKW Candango. The local production lasted from 1958 to 1963 in four-wheel drive and two-wheel drive versions.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw%20munga%206%201961%20interior.jpg)

A decade after the Munga went out of production, VW had bought Auto Union from Mercedes and they redesigned the basic platform into the VW Iltis, again for military duty.
"

THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND IN A MUNGA
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Queen.jpg)

MUNGA WITH A RECOILLESS RIFLE
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1967-dkw-f91-8-munga-with-recoilless-rifle-4x4.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/8955692724_1faf2fef23_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1964_23_2.jpg)

HERE IS JOHN FARMER'S MUNGA AT ELLERSLIE, AUCKLAND

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000S%20en%20Munga.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11800208_983128081737793_4399246386486243819_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1959_12_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1964_19_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_18_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_04_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/munga8_01_big.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/405ph02.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 05, 2016, 12:50:37 pm
Ok - and now onto something slightly different, before we get on to the DKW F102..................The so-called "two-stroke Ferrari chaser"  -  the DKW Malzoni, later to become the DKW Puma (forerunner of the VW Puma);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-GT-Malzoni-729x486-1cf9729d578772fa.jpg)

What do you get if you combine Italian coachbuilding, German engineering and a splash of Brazilian flair? In 1965, you got a DKW-VEMAG GT Malzoni.....

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw2.jpg)


"The origin of what became the Puma was the DKW-Malzoni, built by Rino Malzoni of Matão in São Paulo (state) from around 1964. Malzoni was a keen auto racer, and at the behest of DKW-Vemag he developed a competition car based around a DKW straight-three two-stroke engine. Developed to compete with the Willys Interlagos, a locally built copy of the Alpine A108 which was outpacing DKW's heavier sedans, Malzoni developed a steel-bodied prototype. This proved too heavy, and at the São Paulo Motor Show in the fall of 1964 the light, fiberglass-skinned GT made its first appearance. It won its first race, at Interlagos in 1964.Malzoni, auto enthusiast but a lawyer by trade, proceeded to found the company Luminari Ltda with a group of other auto enthusiasts in 1964. Competition cars had bigger 1.1 litre engines with as much as 100 PS (74 kW). The cars began to sell in quantities larger than he himself could build, and on 14 September 1966 the company adopted the Puma name and began building cars in earnest.

The Malzoni GT usually had a panoramic rear windshield, although a very few cars were built of a three-box design. The original GT Malzoni body was then modified by designer Anisio Campos, who made the car somewhat longer and mounted the bumpers higher up, while the car (still on DKW-basis) was now named Puma GT. Production of the Malzoni GT (1964-1966, all types) was about 35 cars. Annual production increased to 125 for 1967 and continued briefly into 1968. All-in-all, about 170 of the DKW-engined cars (Pumas and Malzonis) were built.

In 1967, Volkswagen bought DKW-Vemag, and the Brazilian production of DKWs ceased. With no DKW engine available, a new car was designed based around the rear-engined, air-cooled 1,500 cc Volkswagen Karmann Ghia sold in Brazil. It sold relatively well for a specialist sports car."


HERE ARE THE DKW MALZONI (LATER PUMA) AND THE VW PUMA TOGETHER
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/lmalpum.jpg)

HERE IS THE TEXT OF AN ARTICLE ON THE DKW MALZONI PUBLISHED IN OCTANE MAGAZINE;

"Here’s the perfect question for car experts who think they know everything: what makes an excited ring-ding-ding but looks like a shrunken Ferrari? Which car wears Pininfarina-style couture, from the Plexiglass covers on its headlights to its cheekily terminated tail, yet also trails gentle puffs of blue two-stroke clouds? Hardly anybody in Europe will know.
 
Do you? It’s a DKW-VEMAG GT Malzoni, and it was made in Brazil more than 40 years ago. You can be forgiven for not knowing about them, though – until now, none has ventured onto Europe’s roads. But in its homeland, the licence-built DKW with its bespoke bodywork is a star. Motoring enthusiasts venerate it as an all-time great, and local collectors hunt it with a burning passion.

And that’s no simple task. ‘Only about a dozen roadworthy examples are known today, as well as a couple of wrecks,’ says Boris Feldman, Brazilian collector and Malzoni owner. He’d never sell his, although anyone who wanted to dispose of a Malzoni would find a long list of would-be customers. That notion was brought home to Rodrigo Theise, a 33-year-old DKW restorer from the south of Brazil with family roots in Germany, at 2008’s national gathering of DKW fans in Caxambu: ‘A spontaneous offer was made for the blue Malzoni of over 150,000 real,’ he said. That was around £45,000 – a sum that puts the Malzoni into financial perspective.

The white one that shares space on these pages with the blue DKW is the best-known of them. In 1966 it wrote a chapter of motor sport history that every Brazilian fan knows by heart and today it belongs to Carlos Andre Sarmento, who has poured 2000 man-hours into its restoration.

The background for that great event was the racetrack at Interlagos. There, South America’s racing elite would gather each year for the Mil Milhas (‘1000 miles’), a highly prestigious race in which two drivers shared the wheel of the white GT Malzoni in 1966. One was called Jan Balder, the other was a certain Emerson Fittipaldi who was about to take a step up into Formula 1. For the time being they were both making waves at Interlagos, pushing their little DKW with its four-speed gearbox along for 1000 miles.

And the DKW gave its all. So much so that, with just three laps to go, the impossible looked possible – the little three-cylinder car was going to beat all the exotica. The smell of two-stroke oil was strong, but the whiff of an impending sensation was stronger. And then the dream faded. The little two-stroke that had run so courageously for hour after hour finally weakened. On two cylinders, Balder and Fittipaldi dragged it home in third place to great applause, but no victory. That didn’t stop the celebrations though, for even that result exceeded the wildest of pre-race expectations.

Mind you, DKW two-strokes were no strangers to the racetrack. As early as the 1950s privateers were entering their own saloons in touring car races, and DKW in Germany maintained a competition department that keenly contested rallies and long-distance races such as the Italian Mille Miglia.

Even the DKW licence-holder in Brazil, VEMAG (Veiculos e Máquinas Agricolas, or ‘Agricultural Vehicles and Machines’), maintained a competition department. With the cars designed just for everyday life, tuning was the hot topic of the day and, thanks to its simple, valveless design, the DKW could be persuaded to release more horsepower easily and cheaply. The front-wheel-drive running gear was also able to cope without buckling under the stresses imposed by the track.

Naturally, none of this happened overnight. The little Brazilian Belcar saloon put out a solid and durable 43bhp – enough to get you where you wanted to go, but not quickly. So Jorge Lettry, head of the VEMAG race team, was charged with making the robust two-stroke three-cylinder more powerful. Something also had to be done about the tall, heavy Belcar bodywork, beloved by taxi drivers throughout Sao Paulo and Brasilia, but top-heavy on the track. In the early 1960s they struggled in vain against the low and nimble Willys Interlagos, which was a Brazilian derivative of the French Alpine 108 – and just as vicious in the handling stakes.

Enter Genaro ‘Rino’ Malzoni in 1962, with a plan to match the power with new bodywork. Money wasn’t an issue: his family, with Italian roots, had grown rich on cane sugar, coffee and banking. What he had in mind was a small, pretty coupé in the GT class; something the girls would love, and which was quick enough to win races. A shortened DKW chassis with a tuned engine was a simple combination, easily available too – and that made the coupé a commercial proposition.

An enthusiastic racing driver, Malzoni sketched out the bodywork himself. It’s not hard to see where he got his inspiration: he took Pininfarina’s use of form as the basic recipe for his compact DKW two-door, and seasoned it with a dash of Bizzarrini and a pinch of Frua. Astonishingly, Malzoni succeeded in creating a timeless and perfectly balanced form whose crispness still fascinates today. Its proportions were just right, better than many of the sketches that came from the recognised masters of design.

According to one story, Malzoni invited the VEMAG bosses to a barbeque, showed them his creation, they drove it – and were impressed. So much so that in 1964 the car came onto the market as the GT Malzoni. Rino Malzoni set up for low-volume production, having the bodies made by hand from glassfibre laminate at his own company, Luminari. This was advanced technology for the time, and avoided the need for huge investment in press tools. Malzoni took no chances as far as strength went, and in places the glassfibre and resin were laid up as thick as your finger. DKW-VEMAG bought three for its own competition department, and supported Malzoni’s private initiative to get it into production. It took over the job of installing the mechanical components, and even allowed the coupé to be badged as one of its own.

The cars took to the racetrack immediately, and very quickly recorded their first successes: time and again the fleet-footed GT Malzoni pushed cars with far bigger engines off the podium. Jorge Lettry cut ever more courageous windows in the pistons to optimise the exchange of gases, worked on the shape of the exhaust system (so vital in tuning a two-stroke), and matched the result to a new set of gear ratios. Eventually he wound up the little three-cylinder engine to a scarcely believable 114bhp, easily surpassing the magic 100bhp-per-litre barrier.

‘At the end of the Interlagos straight it was doing nearly 190km/h [119mph],’ says Carlos Andre Sarmento. ‘That’s something nobody had believed the little car was capable of. Lettry performed miracles.’ The engine, once so demure, now screamed like an angry devil, whipping the 680kg coupé along the track at anything up to 7500rpm. The high state of tune compromised its reliability though; with more than 90bhp there were regular problems with pistons and conrods. Back in Germany, DKW’s engineers could hardly believe reports of what the Brazilians were achieving, at least not until the VEMAG team sent an engine to the parent factory. Brazilian two-stroke fans still smile about that.

The VEMAG dealers, on the other hand, had less to smile about. They soon figured out that the exotic new entry to the model line-up was far too expensive to be a success. Rino Malzoni and his team kept production going for a year or so, in which time they produced just 35 cars, then the first series ground to a halt. A second edition arrived in 1967 after Volkswagen bought VEMAG. Called the Puma, it was based on the platform chassis and mechanicals of the Brazilian-market VW Karmann-Ghia, then, from the mid-1970s, the VW Brasilia, and was built with coupe or convertible bodywork until 1997.

Still, it’s the early cars that matter. The young restorer Rodrigo Theise knows that. An inquiry had reached him from Germany; more specifically from Ingolstadt, the home of Audi (with which DKW had merged to form Auto Union in 1932). Ralf Hornung, who searched on Audi’s behalf around the world for important historic vehicles with which to complete the company’s collection, introduced himself with the urgent request to find a restored Malzoni and deliver it to Germany.

For many years Theise followed countless trails until he came across the blue car in these pictures. On one occasion an original body in neighbouring Uruguay slipped through his grasp; another time he came up against a collector who owned a Malzoni and even met with Theise, only to tell him: ‘You can’t see it. Take one more step and I’ll shoot you!’

Theise carried on looking. Acting on a tip-off, he searched back and forth across the area around Santa Cruz do Sul, peering into corners, asking questions and looking. Somewhere, someone told him, somewhere in this place are the remains of a Malzoni, a wreck. Late one afternoon shortly before he had to return to the city, he made one final stop at a petrol station and asked: ‘Is there a neglected old car around here, a VEMAG-DKW?’ The man banged an ice-cold cola on the bar and said: ‘Yes, I know of one.’

What happened next sounds like the screenplay from a spy movie. ‘Drive along this road for exactly six kilometers, then wait,’ the pump attendant instructed Theise. ‘At 7pm a VW Beetle will come by.’ Rodrigo drove off, waited, and shortly after seven o’clock a Beetle drove out of the night. At the wheel sat a farmer. Once more Theise drew the photos of the little coupe out of his pocket. ‘Have you seen one?’ he asked. The farmer nodded. Theise followed the Beetle to a river, and they got out. ‘Come,’ said the farmer, and led the way until they stood in front of the rotted remains of a glassfibre body.

The farmer had driven the Malzoni until the late 1970s, when he had a bad accident, and since then the bare shell had remained there. Theise felt like a prospector who’d washed the nugget of a lifetime out of the sand. What lay before him were the remains of a DKW GT Malzoni – and a lot of work.

The Malzoni duly arrived at Audi’s museum in Ingolstadt in 2009. ‘It was a project of the heart, not business,’ says Peter Kober of Audi Tradition, ‘and the car will not merely be marvelled at in the museum – it will also appear on the grid in classic car races.’

Now, 44 years since the Malzoni’s historic near-victory, Jan Balder (the driver) and Miguel Crispim (VEMAG’s race mechanic) are quarrelling about what caused the problem so close to the end of the race. Balder blames the failure on the ignition. ‘A plug lost its spark,’ has been his contention since 1966. A technical defect robbed him of his victory. But Crispim, who knows every cubic centimetre of that tiny yet highly tuned engine, passionately disagrees: ‘The drivers simply put on too many revs, far more than had been agreed, and stretched the technology beyond its limit just before the end of the race. As a result, one of the pistons seized.  I saw the evidence myself when I took the cylinder head off.’

No matter. As far as the Brazilians were concerned, third in the Mil Milhas felt as good as first, bearing in mind the more established opposition. And with only 35 built, finding a Malzoni is clearly worth the risk of being shot.


1965 DKW-VEMAG GT Malzoni
Engine 981cc in-line three-cylinder, two-stroke, two Weber 45 DCOE 9 carburettors
Power 59bhp @ 4500rpm (road); 95bhp (max 114bhp) @ 6000rpm (race)
Transmission Four-speed manual, front-wheel drive
Steering Rack and pinion
Suspension Front: upper wishbones, lower transverse leaf spring, telescopic dampers. Rear: beam axle, trailing arms, transverse leaf spring, telescopic dampers 
Brakes Drums front and rear
Weight 750kg (680kg in race trim)
Performance Top speed 91-119mph"


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3877389043.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw_malzoni_jan.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1964_DKW_Malzoni_GT_006_0280.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw5.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/pumamarelo%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/pumadebiquini2.png)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/8c65ea724b324386824465e3a80d2367.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Worms on April 05, 2016, 10:14:05 pm
Loving this thread, still!

I have to keep expanding my list of "want" cars  >:D
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 06, 2016, 09:27:38 am
Thanks for the encouragement Worms!  I'll keep trucking along - straight onto the last production car to carry the DKW name - the DKW F102;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/f102-c7a.jpg)

These sold (comparatively) well in New Zealand - and were well loved, with several examples still surviving.  In fact the largest population of surviving RHD F102's in the world is in New Zealand!

But I am getting ahead of myself now:

When describing it - Audi describes it thus;

"The successor to the Auto Union 1000 appeared on the market in 1964. The DKW F 102 was modern in design and noted for its unitary body construction which marked the end of the separate chassis and body. However, this large DKW was still fitted with a three-cylinder two-stroke engine. It was to be the last two-stroke passenger car in the company‘s history.
 
DKW F 102 saloon 2-door, 1964
Engine: 3-cylinder in-line, 2-stroke
Displacement: 1,168 cc
Power: 60 hp at 4,500 rpm
Maximum speed: 84 mph
Fuel consumption: 21 mpg
Price: DM 7,200
Series: 1964-1966
Production: 52,753 cars"


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1933657_969251116446770_4259684165080130438_o.jpg)

Once again, Wikipedia put it better than I could myself really;

"The DKW F102 is a car that was produced initially by German manufacturer Auto Union GmbH and later by Volkswagenwerk AG after Volkswagen acquired the Auto Union brands from Daimler-Benz AG in 1964.

The last European built Auto Union 1000 and 1000S models were produced in July 1963 and the DKW F102 was presented as a replacement model in September 1963, although volume production of 2-door F102s began only in March 1964 with four door cars joining them on the production line in January 1965.[3]

It was the last model developed before the Volkswagen take-over. Under Volkswagen control, the F102 provided the basis for the later Audi F103 models (the "Audi" and later "Audi 72", plus 60, 75, 80, and Super 90).

The F102 featured state-of-the-art two-stroke technology for its time and a unibody of modern design. Nevertheless, the market of the 1960s shunned two-stroke engines as old-fashioned. The F102 in consequence sold below the company's expectations and was the source of huge financial losses. Due to this situation Volkswagen was forced to implement a radical change in 1966. The production of two-stroke-engines was ended, with the last F102s produced in March 1966, by when 52,753[3] or 53,053 had been produced.[4] The F102 was redesigned to accommodate a four-cylinder-four-stroke-engine. At this point the name of DKW was abandoned, and the F102 mutated into the Audi F103, the first new Audi model since 1938."


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3.jpg)

To tell the story somewhat further - there was a lot of internal strife (understandable) in Auto Union at the time.  My friend Rinus van der Berg put it well;

"The DKW F102 of 1963/4 with its 1200cc could not compete with the opposition regarding performance and fuel consumption. Within Auto Union there was two directions of thinking: those pro two stroke and those anti two stroke led by Herr Dr Ludwig Krause of Daimler Benz. Herr Krause and D.B thus developed a 4 cylinder 4 stroke motor to improve output of the F102. This motor was referred to as the "mitteldruck motor" [high compression engine]. On the other side of Auto Union were those faithful to the two stroke and had got Herr Dr Hans Muller of Andernach to develop an improved 2 stroke machine for the F102. A motor of V6 configuration was decided upon - thus keeping each cylinder's capacity to below 250cc, which is optimum for a two stroke. The Muller Andernach motor was of 1300cc capacity with its 6 cylinders. The original F102 motor with its 3 cylinder was of 1200cc capacity - thus 400cc per cylinder - way too big ! It is reputed, and I cannot back this up as the truth, that an SP or F102 fitted with the Muller motor had taken on a Mercedes Benz sport model on an autobahn and had virtually left it standing. Bitterness in the DB stables and soon afterwards they signed ownership over to VW. Unfortunately the Muller motor never went into production. Herr Dr Krause, now on VW's payroll, got his way and his motor went into the F102 body - now recoded as F103 - Better known as Audi 60, 75, 80 and Super 90 range."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto%20Union%20DKW%20F102_02.jpg)

Here is a translated timeline from the German "Welt" Magazine - which explains it somewhat (not a great translation (Google translate)) ;

"History:
1959: The Ingolstadt Auto Union is 100 per cent subsidiary of Daimler-Benz AG, which has already taken over 88 percent of the shares in the previous year
1962: The principle of the two-stroke engines is losing popularity and the DKW sales are steadily declining. The DKW share of German total approvals was in 1961 at 7.2 percent, in 1964 only still at 3.7 percent. Daimler-Benz sent then the engineer Ludwig Kraus as technical director to Ingolstadt. Kraus is commissioned, an originally designed for Daimler-Benz vehicles four-stroke engine for use in the new DKW flagship F 102 adjust
1963: In September, the DKW F celebrates 102 world premiere at the Frankfurt Motor Show, but even with two-stroke engine
1964 takes place in March of mass start of the two-stroke DKW F 102. From October with chrome trim in the side bead and the gutters
1965: in April, the DKW F102 debuts as four-door sedan. Nevertheless, fewer than 1,000 new registrations per month are obtained from August of this year. At the Frankfurt IAA Auto Union Audi is presented, at first only under the model designation "Audi". Volkswagen Group boss Heinrich Nordhoff is German President Heinrich Luebke before the first Audi postwar era of the Frankfurt stand. In this "Audi" with so-called medium-pressure engine and four-stroke principle of Daimler-Benz is an evolution of the DKW F102, which is known internally F 103rd Starting this year, the Ingolstadt-based company is part of the Volkswagen Group. Production capacities in Ingolstadt intended for the production of the VW Beetlebe used. Nevertheless Ludwig Kraus developed secretly, a new Audi model, the Type 100. For the first great economic success carrier, however, the Audi 60 to Super 90 series, which emerged from the Auto Union Audi respectively DKW F102
1966: At the Geneva Salon will be presented in early March still parallel DKW F102 and "Audi". On March 24 runs in the last two-stroke Ingolstadt sedan off the assembly line, a four-door F 102."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/293700_4290189174377_765401763_n_1.jpg)

The bottom line is, really, that the F102 really showed the incestous nature of the German motor industry at the time.  Without Mercedes, there would be no Audi today, and the face of Volkswagen would be massively different. 30 000 unsold F102's standing in yards in late 1965 forced Volkswagen into action!  To put it in point form;

*Daimler Benz wanted the DKW Dusseldorf-Derendorf factory for producing Mercedes-Benz commercial vehicles (which they still do there today).  With them they brought engineering expertise such as engine designer Ludwig Krause.

* The fact that Audi exists today is only due to the fact the Ludwig Krause's brilliant Mercedes "Mitteldruck" engine (developed at Mercedes under the code name "Mexico") inserted into the otherwise very advanced and attractive F102 turned it into a best-selling car - the Auto Union F103, later badged as "Audi" - which thus propelled (and later the more successful development thereof the Audi 100) Auto Union, later Audi to financial stability.

* Volkswagen used much of the design from the Audi cars (developed off the DKW F102) to insert some new breath into their range - which was in need of some new cars in the early 1970's. From this came the Passat cars, which gave much of their DNA to the Golf Mk1  In this way (and I am oversimplifying it here, I know), the DKW F102 is the Grandad of the VW Golf Mk 1. Any Golf Mk1 owner will recognize the components with the familiar Auto Union four rings cast into them - typically with a line passing through the centreline of the rings.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto%20Union%20DKW%20F102_02.jpg)

Now - the Kiwi angle ;

DKW F102's were sold in large quantity in right hand drive in only two countries in the world, the UK and New Zealand.  The big DKW market in South Africa was not receptive to the car (although a few came in, only one survives there). The Kiwi's however, by all accounts, loved the car and the F103 that followed it.  They were raced in New Zealand - here is Brian Rule racing his F102 near Hamilton in the early 1970's;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BrianRuleF102_1.jpg)

Other survivors include this one in Wanaka;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F102wanaka_3.jpg)

Here is another;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DSC00947_1.jpg)

The one survivor in South Africa belongs to Hubert ten Doeschate - it is a little unusual, in that it does not have the fender-mounted indicators (he is seen here driving his daughter Alyssa to a function);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HubertF102.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HubertF1021.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HubertF1023.jpg)

They were raced in South Africa too - here is Coenraad Spamer in Rhodesia;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw102_1.jpg)


And here are a variety of F102 photos;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI090233_1000.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1965_19_2_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12494833_1022421137796434_4136475971924667606_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1964_dkw_f_102_limousine.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI990049_x500.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F102.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI990049_x500.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 07, 2016, 02:40:40 pm
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/M3343b.jpg)

OK, I thought that today we would talk about Hebmüller and Karmann bodied DKW F91's.  As we all know, Volkswagen Type 14A Hebmuller "Beetles" are the most desirable of all Beetles. When talking of Hebmüller, this is virtually the only car that comes to mind, for most people.  Hebmüller did, however build some cars for DKW (the exact number is not known - but it is thought to be less than 20 cars), and designed a very attractive Coupe and Cabriolet.  These were all built 1950-52, after the 1949 fire that effectively weakened and brought on the end of Hebmüller.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/quizz285bis.jpg)

Hebmüller (The coachbuilding company Hebmüller Sons (Karosseriewerke Joseph Hebmüller Söhne)) from Wuppertal (who also built the two seater "Hebmüller" VW cabriolet for Wolfsburg) were producing F89 two seater coupés and cabriolets for Auto Union - they went insolvent by 1952. Karmann (who later built the Karmann Ghia) took over the production of this body – it is assumed that Karmann in any case had supplied the body pressings to Hebmüller.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/g32.jpg)

In their heyday, they were even raced (although a fast car, one would think it too precious a thing to race), with at least one doing very well on the gruelling Leo-Matadi-Leo race in the mid-1950's. "Jacob" (see next paragraph), of course, took part in the 1954 East African Coronation Rally (more on this further down)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1507035_590436031093812_224055959942123925_n.jpg)

Today, these are rare cars - survival figures for Coupe's are unknown (the best known Coupe is "Jacob" which is still alive and well in Pretoria, South Africa - but more about "Jacob" a little later), but the convertibles number 20 known survivors (all Karmann built to my knowledge).  There were 432 cabriolets made originally by Karmann.


They sure were pretty (to me anyway);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_F91_Cabrio_Bj._1953_gesamt.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/7_264_04-750x563.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/7_264_02-750x563.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/7_264_01-750x563.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Sonderklasse-Cabriolet-729x486-07d914bd66321906.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12813906_1010788575626357_1477650100577586151_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/ein-dkw-f91-sonderklasse-cabriolet-37194.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Treffen3_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10506580_900337266657496_71508262260665954_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/87fc2ff3-2410-4044-be59-cfc37c523633-big-teaser.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11012678_896521170386432_8214887445633307082_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/420727_10150656856477302_1338166455_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/64141_10150656852157302_1867306392_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/424375_3287272863033_1304012702_3353689_475701536_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10538639_394215507394062_8660915658111832617_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11401357_770667846379952_6855035398913453390_n.jpg)
OK, now about the Hebmuller/Karmann Coupe;

The best known survivor is, as is mentioned above, "Jacob", which is owned by my friend, DKW aficionado Fritz Eksteen, in Pretoria, South Africa.  Fritz also supplied Audi UK with their 3=6 race car, which they display at various events every year.  I'll let Fritz tell Jacob's story;

"JACOB"

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20F91%202seater%20coupe.jpg)

"In 1953, AUTO UNION started the production of their three cylinder engines, and this vehicle was one of the first ones to be fitted with the 900 cc power plant. Previously the two seater coupés were fitted with the 23 hp or 17 kW 700 cc engines. Hebmueller produced a number of F89s for Auto Union.

Since the outbreak of World War II no DKWs were imported into South Africa till about 1953, when Jacob Bos from Pretoria, a DKW dealer before WW II, got news that the new three-cylinder engine was in production. He allegedly flew to Germany by DC3, a journey that took him a week. He ordered this special version of the F91 at the Duesseldorf factory and Jacob’s DKW was the first three-cylinder DKW, and probably the first DKW that crossed our shores since WW II.

Jacob Bos used this vehicle for rallying and it is said that it was applied in the East Africa Safari Rally in Kenya during the mid-fifties. One can just imagine what this venture entailed – he had to travel thousands of kilometers from Pretoria on his own without a support team, and without any sponsors. He related that it was so dusty that the oil-bath air cleaner was clogged completely, causing significant engine power loss. It had to be cleaned regularly due to the dust build up in the oil bowl.

I first saw this vehicle towards the mid sixties at Jacob’s business in Pretoria. The shape appeared comical to me and I was negatively attracted to the little car. At that time I was not aware of its heritage. The original colour was a deep blue, very much faded when we first met.

Dr. Howell of Pretoria bought the car from Jacob Bos, and when he passed away, his son John inherited the car. I bought the car from him during 1997. It is not hard to tell that the nickname of this car is "Jacob". "


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW%20F91%202s%20Cp%20%20Audi%20TT%20Cp.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 08, 2016, 08:24:45 am
On the subject of low volume production DKW specials - the very attractive DKW Enzmann 500;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/enzmann_logo.gif)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWEnzmann500Front.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Enzmann_500_1960.jpg)

The Enzmann family in Switzerland, who developed the legendary Enzmann 506 fiberglass sports car (VW Beetle based), also developed a very pretty DKW based Spider - the DKW Enzmann 500.  Shortly after World War II, family patriarch Emil Enzmann, Sr. expanded his garage business in Schüpfheim by importing some 60 surplus jeeps from France to the Entlebuch district in central Switzerland, where they were refurbished and sold to farmers. His next project was somewhat more interesting...

Emil Enzmann wanted to make a safe but economical sports car, with good acceleration and easy handling. It would become the Enzmann 506, built on a VW Beetle chassis. The first body was aluminum, but Emil soon decided he and his brothers could use fiberglass, which was a novelty in the 1950's. To save weight while increasing strength, they gave up doors.  The 506 was much faster than the Beetle thanks to the lighter body, but also thanks to engine choices which included the Okrasa high performance engine used in some Beetles, or the Porsche 356 engine. The cars had some success in racing, but production stopped because Volkswagen realized the Enzmann was a competitor for their Karmann-Ghia and declined to continue supplying the chassis.

Emil Enzmann then considered using an alternative platform, and settled on a chassis  DKW. He updated the body design to adapt it from rear-wheel drive with the engine at the back, to the DKW configuration of front-wheel drive with the engine in front.

The new model was called the Enzmann 500. Although the DKW Enzmann 500 had similar lines to the Enzmann 506, it also had improvements including two doors and an extra emergency seat. But the number of 500's built was very small - and it is unknown how many were made.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/enzmann_dkw_01.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Enzmann_Orange_ssf44.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4cfe6a95-2683-4801-9672-124d2b222ecd-big-teaser%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/94122545-389b-4e64-ba6a-7255343fef2f-big-teaser.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/6698fd27-cb09-46b3-b1ce-c802b5d8b9c9-big-teaser.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Enzmann_sf33.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/53186c78-8beb-4baf-9209-1c08d4460f7d-normal.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 08, 2016, 09:33:35 am
I'll intersperse the discussions on DKW/Auto Union based Specials and racing cars, with some posts about Auto Union's post-war racing and rallying history.  The pre-war exploits of the extremely successful world-beating Auto Union racing teams are reasonably well covered by many authors - but I have always felt that the post war successes less so.  This may be part of the "amnesia period" which Audi has held in place, effectively ignoring the DKW period 1945-65, as much as possible.  The truth is - the success of the two-stroke cars and their popularity through the 1950's and early 1960's laid the foundations for the success that Audi is today. A large part of this is sporting heritage - I am often surprised that people aren't even aware that the Audi/Auto Union was well versed in racing and race success long before the Quattro...

By rights I should start with Walter Schluter in 1954 - but I thought I would start with one of my favourite DKW Victories - the 1956 Coronation Safari Rally;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Coronation.jpg)

Eric Cecil and Tony Vickers race to a glorious overall victory in the toughest rally in the world – the Coronation Rally – 24th-27th May 1956


-----------------------------------------------
                                                     
 Seventy Eight cars, the highest number of finishers in any Coronation Rally (later called the East African Safari Rally) completed the 1956 rally, a dry, dusty affair.  The 13 finishers who had cleared the route without a single penalty point then had to undergo a track test or “flying lap” over one lap of the Nakuru Park circuit to decide the issue and break the tie.
This was the second and last time that an extraneous test had to be used to adjudge the outcome of the Safari. The Nakuru track test, to a predetermined formula, favoured the smaller cars as did the tight circuit where the long-wheel based cars were handicapped when cornering.
Eric Cecil and Tony Vickers' lap time in a DKW for 1 min 45.6 sec (the vastly more experienced race driver Jim Heather-Hayes in a Mercedes 220A was 5.1 sec faster) gave them overall victory.  Simca won the manufacturers' award, the first French marque to do so.  Second position in Class B, also went to a DKW – driven by R.F.Jennings and D.Partridge.   

 This was to be a poor year for Volkswagens, the classes were still organised on the showroom price of the car and for the first time VWs were over the limit of £516 for class “A” and now ran in the up to £735 class (same class as the DKW, which significantly outgunned them).  The best that could be achieved  for VW was 8thin class “B” For although the car of Frazer & Brochner finished penalty free, they were not quick enough on the tie-deciding blast round Nakuru race circuit.
The Coronation (or Safari) Rally differed from many other events in the world championship in that it was won and lost in open road. No special stages timed to the second were deemed necessary, for the timing of each section was in minutes. Early Coronation Rallies were for cars in ‘showroom condition’ and very few modifications were permitted.
These classes were based on retail value rather than engine size and the winner of these early events was sure to find the sales of the successful model soaring in the following months – the East African residents used the Coronation/Safari as a yardstick as to what cars to buy. The Coronation/Safari Rally was such an excellent proving ground that there is little wonder that local car dealers supported the event in a big way.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Coronation2.png)

As for Eric Cecil, winner of the 1956 event, he is credited as the progenitor of the “Coronation Rally” .  He was, for the rest of life, known as “Bwana Safari”. To quote from Wikipedia;
 “The idea of the rally began in 1950 when a pair of Nairobi businessmen, Neil and Donald Vincent, who recently had set a new record at the Nairobi – Cape Town – Nairobi run, were approached by their cousin Eric Cecil, who was a chairman of the motorsport committee of the REAAA, to race at the 3.3 mile Langa Langa (now known as Gilgil) circuit that was made up of perimeter roads of a World War II military camp. The Vincents were unenthusiastic at the idea as they had grown tired of circuit racing but were interested in the idea of a long-distance driving event similar to the one in which they had competed for the previous year. Cecil considered a road race around Lake Victoria but shelved the idea when he realised that parts of northern Tanzania, where the race would be likely to take place, was prone to seasonal flooding, making that idea impractical.
Eventually various ideas began to gel together forming the basis of the rally that was to be run over roads in the three African Great Lakes nations of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. This idea became a reality in 1953 when it was staged over the holidays as the East African Coronation Safari, a celebration of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.”


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Coronation3.jpg)

Crowds at the finish of the 1956 Coronation Rally

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Coronation4.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: RobClubley on April 08, 2016, 09:37:19 am
So much history I wasn't even aware of! That F102 is awesome!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: wilco on April 10, 2016, 09:21:24 am
Great history.
I could do with one of those Enzmann 500's...
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 11, 2016, 08:48:31 am
Thanks Guys - I thought you would share the DKW Sauter with you this morning - the DKW cars were an ideal basis for Formula Junior racing cars - and several individuals produced very successful Formula Junior cars off DKW's - Sauter is one of these (he also produced DKW based Sports cars);

Sauter was a Swiss racing car manufacturer of the 1950s and 1960s.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/sauter.jpg)

The Swiss racer Kurt Sauter produced vehicles independently in his workshop in Basel from the 1950's onwards. Until the mid-1960s, Sauter earned a reputation as a manufacturer of high grade small series cars in the world of international motorsport. Sauter himself was a very active Racer.

The construction of the Sauter Formula Junior car had its origin in the " Bamosa" . Fellow Swiss racer, Peter Monteverdi , who in the 1950s raced extensively, later became known and popular as a sports car maker drove in 1990 with Onyx even in Formula 1. Monteverdi was the initiator of the Bamosa project (Bale - Monteverdi - Sauter). However, before the team could properly get going, Sauter went his own way, to build his own car.

The Sauter Formula Junior had a multi-tubular frame and a plastic body. The small vehicle was powered by a 1-liter two-stroke DKW engine . The Sauter resembled outwardly the MBM Type A, the successor of the Bamosa.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Sauter_Formel_Junior_-_DKW_36.jpg)

Here is another of Sauter's cars;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Sauter_Karosserie_023.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 11, 2016, 09:16:54 am
Auto Union DKW on the 1959 Monte Carlo Rally

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo59.png)

Fausto Meyrat / Robert Meyer Auto Union 1000 – having rolled the car – they persisted to complete the race.  Note the goggles  - worn on account of the broken windscreen.
                                                            -------------------------------

The “Rallye Monte Carlo” for 1959  was held on 19th-24th January 1959 - there 350 entries in total, 321 starters and 119 finishers.Start cities were Glasgow, The Hague, Munich, Paris, Rome, Stockholm, Warsaw and Athens.
  That year, 1959 saw a massive entry from Auto Union DKW – traditionally a strong team in the Monte – with consistently strong placings since 1954, with an entry of no less than 20 cars, of which 16 finished (13 within the time limit).  This stood in contrast to the other big entries – Jaguar for example entered 21 cars and only 8 cars finished the race within the time limit.
Although DKW’s came third overall in the 1956 and ’58 Rallye Monte Carlo  (there was no event in 1957)– the highest placing for 1959 was a Class win for Siegfried Eikelmann  and Hans Wencher who also came 7th overall.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo592.png)

Siegfried Eikelmann/Hans Wencher – class winners (under 1000cc) and 7th overall on the ’59 Monte

The DKW F91 of M.Grosgogeat/P.Biagini came 11th overall (Pat Moss was 10th in an Austin A40), beating all the Austin Healeys!  This team had been rallying with great success since 1952 – and had been using a DKW F91 since 1956 (they previously used a Panhard Dyna)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo56.jpg)

The DKW F91 of M.Grosgogeat/P.Biagini on the 1956 Monte Carlo


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo593.png)

Entries came from all over Europe, here are the Dutch team for the ’59 Monte- L. P. M. C. de Schutter  and P. H. M. Hendrikx

For 1959 ,of course, the rally was won by a Citroen DS19 - Auto Union ,though, were still proud of the result and placed a full page advertisement in the English magazine “Motor Sport” in July 1959, specifically detailing these successes;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo594.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo5.png)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: ben_d on April 11, 2016, 08:06:37 pm
The DKW / Auto Union history is very interesting. Do you know much about the Elva DKW that races around NZ?

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2041/2347973125_30257a9804.jpg)

Is that a home-built car or a factory built? I have seen it in action on a few tracks around NZ and it is a real go-er!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 12, 2016, 07:13:36 am
Excellent ben_d !  The Elva-DKW was next on my list - and yes Walter Findlay does race his example in NZ - what a sound!  Here we go;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/maxresdefault.jpg)

The history of Elva itself is well covered on the Internet - we'll just discuss the Elva-DKW here (and lower down the Mitter-DKW and the Van Der Merwe Special and Ryetune DKW Scorpion which have some relevance);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/A_logo_for_the_Elva_manufacturer_of_racing_prototypes.gif)

In 1959 Frank Nichols switched to a two-stroke DKW engine supplied by Gerhard Mitter for his Formula Junior race cars.  In 1959 Peter Arundell won the John Davy Trophy at the Boxing Day Brands Hatch meeting driving an Elva-D.K.W. "Orders poured in for the Elva but when the 1960 season commenced Lotus and Cooper had things under control and disillusioned Elva owners watched the rear-engined car disappearing round corners, knowing they had backed the wrong horse."  Sporadic success continued for Elva in the early part of that year, with Jim Hall winning at Sebring and Loyer at Montlhéry.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/elvamon.jpg)

There is a  nice gallery of images of Walter Findlay's car racing in NZ here:

http://www.groundsky.co.nz/index.php?Action=VEI&EventCode=1301&EntrantID=18873&ImageID=443045

and a REALLY EXCELLENT Youtube video of it here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wJ0MmbP-QQ

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/s-l225.jpg)

Now, Gerhard Mitter, of course, also built his own car, the Mitter-DKW - "the Mitter-DKW Formula Junior is one of a handful of its type originally built by Gerhard Mitter, who later drove in Formula l and Formula 2. Mitter’s DKW-engined car was one of the first Formula Juniors and early on beat the dominant Stanguellini in its first season. Following this success Mitter decided to build a series of ten cars of
improved design, though it is believed that only six were laid down. Mitter himself was a DKW tuning expert, but his cars were off the pace when the first Ford-engined Formula Juniors appeared.
It is believed that only three Mitters survive, one in the USA and the other in pieces in Europe."


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/0000326624.jpg)

Here is a Mitter on the back of a DKW Schnellaster with a DKW Junior ahead of it!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13124484_1050910188280862_6673589495543391922_n.jpg)

Mitter workshop

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13138750_1050910838280797_1211713645517144002_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/image.jpg)

The one pictured above has the following story:

" This particular car was purchased by the famous South African driver, Sarel van der Merwe (father of Le Mans winner Alan) in I960. It proved uncompetitive in South Africa and was abandoned in 1961, never having won a race. The ‘quick bits’ were removed and put into an Auto Union saloon that raced in the Kyalami 9 Hours. The Mitter was sold to an Indian family and disappeared from view. It was unearthed in 1999 by enthusiast Peter du Toit, who rebuilt it totally, and raced regularly in historic events.
The car was purchased by the current owner in 2002 and has continued to race in historic events with some success in handicap series. Restored in 2003, it has a rebuilt 1,000cc motor breathing through triple Amal carburettors. The suspension and gearbox are to the original DKW design, while the tyres are new Dunlop ‘historic’. The car is ‘on the button’ and the incredible two-stroke exhaust noise ensures that it attracts serious attention wherever it goes. Although currently uncompetitive in ‘flat out’ Formula Junior races, it is unique and has the potential to go faster and handle better. Due to the novelty of its three-cylinder two-stoke engine, not to mention front-wheel drive, the Mitter has no difficulty in garnering invites to prestigious Formula Junior events worldwide. It was accepted for the 2004 Monaco event and this year raced at the historic races at Porto and Brands Hatch."


Then - the story still continues further - about the engine (which was fitted to Sarel van der Merwe's special);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/sarel-roof.jpg)

"Sarel van der Merwe was an accomplished DKW racing driver. Like
everybody else, at the time, he had to modify and build the cars himself.
He had retired from active racing by now and his favourite DKW
racing car was parked behind his house.

However, as Sarel junior's 18th birthday was approaching and Sarel
junior could hardly wait to obtain his drivers licence, father was
concerned that his son may have aspirations on his racing car.


This he planned to prevent at all cost, so the day before Sarel junior's
18th birthday he phoned Coenraad Spamer to offer him his beloved
DKW, provided he came to fetch it immediately and would return the
engine to him the next day, so he could mount it in a glass case. He
was not prepared to part with his DKW engine, which had won him
so many races.
"

There is more to the Elva story though....

More DKW engined FJ cars were produced with Elva involvement - it was called the Ryetune DKW Scorpion - The Scorpion was the Elva front engined junior produced by a 'shadow' company called Ryetune while Elva themselves were in receivership. After financial problems caused by the failure of the US distributor, Frank Nichols started a new company in Rye, Sussex in 1961 to continue building racing cars.  I have heard it said that Konig was involved in the DKW Scorpion project, but I cannot be sure of this.

That said - a total of nine Ryetune DKW Scorpions were made.

(Green car in this photo)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Geoff%20Monaco1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw%20scorpion.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 12, 2016, 08:09:10 am
Famous sportsman Pele learnt to drive on a DKW at a Brazilian driving school  “Miramar”in 1957 and still maintains a proud brag that he has never made an accident… 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Pele.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 12, 2016, 12:07:59 pm
A tale of two Spyders.........

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HartmannDKW.jpg)

Alfred Hartmann was a tinkerer and and a racer - a colourful one at that : In 1937, he was racing DKW motorcycles, reaching the European Championship, which is equivalent to the current World Cup, and achieved an excellent fourth place.

During World War II Hartmann lost his left arm, this, however, did not stop him, and he was back to racing after the Second World War. In 1955  he drove a DKW 3 = 6 on the Mille Miglia and won in the category up to 1100cc engine capacity despite a handicap of 200 cc over the other starters - he achieved sixth overall! In the early 1950s  the idea to build his own race car matured, naturally of DKW basis.

One of his projects was built by Karosserie Reutter of Stuttgart, was called "officially" the "Hartmann DKW Spyder". After several successes with this vehicle,  Hartmann also developed a number of very successful DKW Junior racing cars.

Interestingly, the Hartmann Spyder was a replica: An identical looking vehicle was designed in Wuppertal in 1956 by the coachbuilding company  "Drews" and built on a DKW F93 chassis. The customer of this "first" car is  believed to have been a former employee of DKW in Dusseldorf.

It is said that Hartmann's car was rather badly received in Wuppertal - having been an exact copy of the Drews car!  It is thought that the existing survivor is in fact the Wuppertal car - although the name "Hartmann DKW Spyder" persists.

Audi maintain one Hartmann's FJ cars in its own collection.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HartmannDKW5.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HartmannDKW4.jpg)

Here is Hartmann's car after scoring a class win at the "Internationalen Alpen-Bergpreis" of 1958;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5a13cc115020211e11402864c9ac2e44.jpg)

and here at the "Internationales Auto- und Motorradrennen am Flugplatz Zeltweg" 1957;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/0000322434.jpg)

Here is another view;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw%20hartmann1.jpg)

Here is Audi's example of the Hartmann-DKW FJ  on display at the Audi Stand at Techno Classica Essen 2014;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/be9f59c1-5254-4bb0-87c3-c1c71ebd2356-big-teaser.jpg)

Hartmann's mountain-tunnel workshop in Berchtesgaden-Oberau, circa 1960, showing Hartmann DKW FJ cars

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Hartmann%202_664x443_242844.jpg)

There is a great video of the Hartmann Spyder, and Hartmann FJ car racing here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsrhVU2geXA
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on April 12, 2016, 01:29:24 pm
Lot of interesting stuff coming out of this thread. Please keep it coming
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 13, 2016, 08:24:07 am
Jim Clark and DKW

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/jc-1966.jpg)

Formula 1 driver Jim Clark (4 March 1936 – 7 April 1968)  started his career off by racing a DKW F91.  His first race was on 16 June 1956. Ian Scott-Watson ( a farmer, like Clark) entered his DKW Sonderklasse in a race meeting in Crimond near Fraserburgh. He also secretly entered Jim in the sports car race. When Jim left home in Chirnside to accompany his friend, Ian Scott- Watson in the latter's DKW Sonderklasse on the long haul to Crimond, the wartime airfield between Peterhead and Fraserburgh where the Aberdeen & District Motor Club ran races for both cars and motorcycles on the same day, he had no idea what was in store.

JIM CLARK ON HIS FIRST RACE 16 JUNE 1956

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/73362_080_122_87lo.jpg)

  Jim had always been reluctant to race near home, as his parents felt motor racing was frivolous, expensive and dangerous. Crimond was far enough away from home that it seemed they wouldn’t find out. As a novice, it was no surprise that Jim came last in the race, but his times were so good that Ian was penalised in the handicap race. The organisers deemed that Ian had been “sandbagging” in practice to improve his chances of victory.

 It became clear that Clark had talent. This got Jock McBain and Ian Scott Watson thinking, and it was decided a car would be bought and shared by Jimmy Somervail, Ian Scott Watson and possibly Jim Clark. The car they bought was a Jaguar D type that had originally been owned by Gillie Tyrer and Alex McMillan.  Ian eventually swapped his DKW for a Porsche 1600 Super.

Alan Curry (last known living in NZ), who occasionally raced an old Riley saloon went with Ian Scott Watson on the 1955 International Scottish Rally and managed to roll poor old Ian's first DKW Sonderklasse as can be seen here at the start of the Ganavan Sands Test on the rally. The car that Jim Clark raced in 1956, was the second of Ian's DKW's.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/images%203.jpg)

Over time - people have expressed surprise that the DKW would be racing with such exotic company - words like "humble DKW" etc.. have been used in recent years - such, I have to say, is a failure to appreciate the abilities of the DKW, while humble, yes, was competitive and considered a fast car in those days.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 13, 2016, 01:08:32 pm
Here is one of the "uglies" - a DKW F91 based one-off called the "Claveau 56" - surely one of the oddest cars ever associated with the "Four Rings" here its translated story from the internet;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/claveau_01.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/automobilix_1136641079_claveau.jpg)

"The collection of the Tampa Bay Automotive Museum is focused on
inventive engineering from the twenties and the thirties.

One man is highly symbolic of this period: Emile Claveau, who was
first exhibiting in 1926 at the Paris Automobile Show.

He was not a trained Automobile Engineer, but instead learned painting
at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Tours. His ideas were always right, but
definitely ahead of their time. He designed very advanced cars, but
never sold a single one.

His first prototype at the Paris Show was a mid-engine car with an
aerodynamic body. The design was very rational and he avoided using a
rear engine, with too much imbalance in the repartition of weights
between the front and the rear axle. In fact, in 1926 it was a much
better design than the Volkswagen, born in 1934, or the Mercedes 130
or 170 H from 1934 and 1936. It was closer to the Rumpler from the
early twenties.

For three years he came back to the Paris Show with the same basic
principle but with constant ameliorations.

In 1930 when other Engineers were jumping on the bandwagon with rear
engines, he declared than the front wheel drive was a better solution.
 To improve the handling with a rear engine, it was necessary to move
the engine forward, which was detrimental to the space for passengers
and luggage. Today the mid-engine solution is found in racecars or
sport cars, generally seating two people.
It was a difficult decision when we consider his past position for the
mid-engine car, but Emile Claveau was a very honest man who followed
his best judgment.

Bodies were of the pontoon type, always aerodynamic. The name of the
new front wheel car was Auto-Bloc.

When few Companies were struggling with independent suspension for the
front wheels he was already a champion of the independent suspension
for all four wheels.

The body of his front wheel drive design was retaining the same
characteristics as the mid- engine cars for the aero dynamism and also
for the construction, modular and without a chassis.

Besides designing advanced prototypes he was giving conferences and
writing in automobile magazines without any concession to the old
guard. Public relations were not his forte.
In 1948, he was back in the Salon de I' Automobile in Paris Show with
another front wheel drive automobile. It was a Sedan for six
passengers. Body was in aluminum, the engine was a V8 placed forward
of the front wheels. The name of the car was "Descartes" in reference
to the Cartesian Logic.

He had no better chance of selling the world on his conepts than in
the pre-war shows. Everybody admired the car but no one was interested
by his manufacturing and marketing methods.
Today Emile Claveau is forgotten. All of his prototypes are gone with
the exception of the very last one from the 1956 Paris Show. A great
French Collector and Automobile Historian, Docteur Jeanson, saved it.
The Docteur Jeanson is no longer with us and the Claveau is now part
of the Tampa Bay Automotive Museum collection.

The car is front wheel drive with a DKW 3 cylinder, two-stroke engine.
The body is very aerodynamic, but is made of steel. Aluminum may have
been too expensive for Emile Claveau, who for thirty years was
financing all of his prototypes out of his own pocket.

The independent suspension on the four wheels is by "Anneaux Neiman,"
using a set of 8 rubber rings nested in each other. This system was
used on scooters, bikes and few light cars in the forties and fifties.
The Claveau 56 is now restored.

It was never driven and in fact the petrol tank was not installed. The
engine is brand new with shiny pistons, and 50 years after the Paris
Show the Claveau, it is finally on the road.

The Claveau 56 handles very well and the styling looks very modern.

In studying the life of Emile Claveau, we can follow the evolution and
the progress in automobile engineering during the twenties and the
forties. It is difficult, if not impossible, for an Engineer to create
revolutionary concepts out of the main stream.
"


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Claveau561.jpg)

There is  a video on YouTube now of the Claveau 56 being driven - certainly very interesting, seems a bit of a choppy ride though on the rubber ring suspension! See it HERE :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eX4P6CHUHwU



(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Claveau56.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/claveau_56_01b.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 13, 2016, 01:43:51 pm
DKW's on the Acropolis Rally late 50's - early '60s

George Raptopoulos in his DKW F12 on the 1964 Acropolis Rally

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/acropolis_tatoi_dkw-f12_g-raptopoulos-a-barkoulis.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13612334_1087755504596330_7470204527984838565_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Acropolis%20Rally3.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Acropolis%20Rally2.jpg)



Wolfgang Levy and Hans Wenscher won the 1959 Acropolis Rally in a brand new Auto Union 1000 - here are the results of the 1959 event;

7th Acropolis Rally
25th-31st May 1959


 1     Wolfgang Levy/H.Wenscher                 Auto Union 1000
 2     Walter Hans-Joachim/Nathan Max         Porsche 356 Carrera
 3     Nicos Filinis/Stelios Mourtzopoulos        Auto Union 1000
 4     Alkis Michos/C.Theodoracopoulos       Alfa Romeo
 5     Eikelmann Siegfried/ Kühne Hermann   Auto Union 1000

Wolfgang Levy also came 2nd in the 1958 Adriatic Rally in his DKW

HERE ARE THE WINNERS OF THE 1959 ACROPOLIS RALLY WOLFGANG LEVY AND HANS WENSCHER, RECEIVING THEIR CONGRATULATIONS, WITH THEIR AUTO UNION 1000

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000%20acropole1.jpg)
     
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 14, 2016, 08:44:56 am
As part of continuing the discussion on DKW based "Specials" and one-off's - the DKW Flintridge, one of the most ambitious projects of all (as far as DKW based low volume sportscars go);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fli0.jpg)

CLICK ON THE PHOTO FOR A LARGER VERSION

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/img629.jpg)

A quote from Road and Track Magazine;

"DKW Flintridge (Road & Track, October 1957)
It’s Original, It’s Good-Looking, And It Holds Four
Story and Photos By William Carroll

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan_730.jpg)

Another company – this time an American corporation – has initiated production of a custom line of cars based on the DKW.  The line at Flintridge Motors Manufacturing Corporation of California (1220 Glendon Avenue, Los Angeles 24, California) is now in production after nearly $75,000 was spent to develop the prototypes.

The four-passenger sports car is produced by cutting the roof and removing the fenders from a standard DKW coupe.  Over the remaining sheet metal is placed a reinforced fiberglass shell.  Flintridge Motors was organized for the production of cars and is licensed by the State of California as an automobile manufacturer.  The German DKW factory guarantees the Flintridge products in the same manner as it guarantees all DKW cars.

For the present, only franchised DKW dealers will sell the Flintridge.  It may also be offered at a later date to independent dealers.  Retailing at $3195 F.O.B. Los Angeles (a comparable DKW hardtop coupe is about $2275), the car will be shipped directly to dealers from the local factory.  Floor stocking is expected to begin with two months.  The sports car s a full five seater almost as long as a Thunderbird, but 350 pounds lighter than the DKW hardtop from which it is produced.       

Actual manufacturing is handled by the Woodill Fiber Glass Body Corporation of Santa Ana, California.  DKW coupes are delivered directly from the Port of Entry at San Pedro to the Woodill factory.  There, all interior upholstery is removed, and the top, doors, fenders, and instruments taken from the car.

PRODUCTION LINE AT WOODHILL
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Flintridge%20DKW%20Darrins%20assembly%20at%20woodill.jpg)

The cowl section is moved backward 6 inches and lowered 4, while a new metal frame member is installed to retain the stiffness of the original assembly.  Then, fiberglass shells are attached to the car, creating an envelope body.  The original DKW doors are altered slightly, then covered with fiberglass, so that the completed car has roll-up windows and all the conveniences of a hardtop coupe.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan_420.jpg)

New interior trim is intended to go with the exterior finishes.  These will be iridescent colors, known by jewel terms such as Sapphire Blue, Ruby Red, and, alas, Forever Amber.  A removable fiberglass hard top weighs less than 40 pounds.  Production started July 15th and is expected to reach 200 units monthly by October 1st (1957).


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan_332.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan_731.jpg)

CLICK FOR LARGER ON THE PHOTO

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/689.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan_417.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan_406.jpg)

Here is a survivor (of sorts);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_1242.jpg)

Of course, as we discussed earlier - Darrin also produced the "DKW-Flintridge Caravan" on the DKW Schnellaster chassis;


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Motorhome.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 14, 2016, 11:36:31 am
From "Motorsport" magazine, April 1961

Page 59, April 1961
"300 D.K.W. JUNIORS A DAY

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/23713831169_9f66cb5cb4.jpg)


We visited recently Auto Union G.m.b.H. at their new ultra-modern factory which is situated in the ancient town of Ingolstadt, some 50 miles north of Munich. It stands as a symbol of this firm's hard struggle since the end of the War; in 1945 Auto Union lost everything behind the Russian curtain to what is now called East Germany. However, they managed to save their name and patents, and in 1949 they began building motorcycles in Ingolstadt, and later D.K.W. Meisterklasse cars in Dusseldorf. In 1958 they designed and developed a new and potentially popular car. It was first seen as a prototype the year before, and they were sure this car would have a large market—it was named the D.K.W. Junior. Having no facilities to build the Junior, the Ingolstadt Site was acquired, with its well equipped railway sidings and ample space for expansion, in July 1958. Within five months a thousand workmen used 12,000 tons of cement, 5,000 tons of steel and 40,060 tons of concrete, which built a factory 1,0.00 feet by 475 feet with two floors. A further six months was spent installing the machinery and other fittings necessary in a motor car factory. Thus within the space of 12 months Auto Union had ,built a factory to mass produce a car of their own design, and were producing it at the rate of 300 a day.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/100903113342526955.jpg)

The layout of this factory is extravagantly spacious with highly automatic precision machinery, the production line proper being housed on the upper floor and the press line extending over both floors. The engine assembly line runs parallel with the giant presses, and every single part of the engine is automatically assembled. After pressing, the bodies pass through the degreasing plant, into an anti-corrosive bath, to the grinding shop, on to the spray painting plant, into the enamelling furnace, through the extremely wet polishing station, and are finally lowered on to the assembly line. One interesting feature was the dipping of the body into the primer tank. The body was held at an angle which kept the front right wing uppermost. As it was lowered the body -swayed -gently, and continued to sway as it was raised. This action produced a very even and smooth surface over the entire body. An example of the high pitch of automation was the welding machine which strip-welded the box-section frames of the chassis at fantastic speed and accuracy and required the employment of one machine minder only. During the manufacture of the car men would step forward to check and test the various parts; for example, the wings of the Junior are all bolted on automatically. Immediately this has been done another man steps forward and checks the tightness by hand, using a torque wrench. The general atmosphere was clean and bright and if the work was not hard it. was steady and continuous. The workers seem to disregard the portable snack-bars and cigarette machines supplied for their benefit, and no-one sat in a corner reading the daily newspaper or drinking cups or tea—they had a job to do and they were doing it. One out of every five was in a supervisory capacity, but thiS was not apparent to the outsider for there was no difference in dress or approach to work. [Could this be why slacking wasn't in evidence ?—En.] Each man works a 45-hour week and depending on his skill will earn between 200 D.M. and 150 D.M. per week.

It takes nine hours to build one car; and 300 cars leave the factory each day. However, this is not fast enough and a duplicate factory is already under construction alongside the existing one. The plans for 1961 are to build D.K.W. Juniors as quickly as possible, and there will be no change of the model during this year. In Germany it costs 4,950 D.M., which is only.-430 more expensive than the Volkswagen, but in tax-ridden Britain it is only a few pounds short of 800.—D. \V. 'I'. "


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/24358588431_6196dddbfe.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Juniorfactory.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Juniorfactory2.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 14, 2016, 04:05:27 pm
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/download.png)
In 1956 Pininfarina produced this chic aluminium bodied coupe for Auto Union on a 3=6 chassis.  Auto Union DKW seriously debated production - but eventually rejected the project on basis of cost. It remains, today, known only as the "Pininfarina DKW".

A driveable prototype was never constructed.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI090414_1000.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on April 14, 2016, 04:25:38 pm
Looks a bit like a Borgward of the early 60's
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 15, 2016, 08:39:42 am
DKW 's were raced and rallied extensively in events around the world.  One of the lesser known places where Auto Union DKW cars were very popular, was Sri Lanka.

Sri Lankan racing driver S.Withana raced DKW's;

(His favourite- The DKW Saloon at Katukurunda 7th November 1971)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fea3-1.jpg)

His racing career commenced when in 1967 he purchased a DKW from the Franchise Holder Associated Engineering Co. Ltd. His friend Mohan Uyanage, who was aware that Withana’s ambition was to be a racing driver, gave him all assistance to make his debut at the Katukurunda Circuit in 1968. He did not let his friend down and came second in a photo-finish with Rohan Perera who also drove a DKW winning the event. This close finish rocketed him on his Racing Career participating at every event. This close finish rocketed him on his Racing Career participating event organized by every Motor Sports Club in Sri Lanka.

Besides the DKW Saloon Car, Withana raced a DKW Special with a body built in Sri Lanka. He was a familiar site at Katukurunda (Circuit), Katunayake (7 Grand Prix), Nuwara Eliya, Kandy, Kurunegala (Road Races), Mahagastota Royal Park (Hill Climb) and in almost all Circuits, Hill Climbs and Rallies.

His greatest love was for the Nutivara Eliya Road Race (incidentally, the 1st Road Race in Sri Lanka was held on the 22nd January 1950). He vividly recollects the Nuwara Eliva Road Race in 1975, where he crashed at the Grand Hotel Roundabout, due to heavy rain. The suspension system of his car was damaged, but with the assistance of Mervyn Rodrigo, Manager of the Nuwara Eliya Brewery, who also owned a DKW, allowed him to dismantle his car and by 6.00 the following morninq, the repair work had been done and the DKW was at the Starting Grid. No one expected Withana to race that day. But his sheer determination and love for Motor Sports made him do what he did! He was placed 2nd and was awarded a Special Trophy for the "Best Loser"!

In the Withana-DKW special Katukurunda January 1979

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fea3-3.jpg)

Sri Lanka boasts a population of Auto Union DKW's kept in immaculate condition - here are some of them;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/17_big.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/19_big.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/18_big.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/181_big.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 15, 2016, 08:56:34 am
DKW was considered a most superior car for difficult terrain long journeys in Africa in the 1950’s.  One such adventurer, John Brom completed such a journey, totalling no less than 20 000 miles in the Congo in 1957 in a 1955 DKW F91 Universal (Brom named the car "Soucoup Volante" (Flying Saucer) and published a book on it in 1958 – it is “Twenty thousand miles in the African Jungle” by John L Brom.

John L. Brom’s film expeditions from 1949 to 1962 through sub-Saharan Africa, captured moments in African history never captured before or since. Brom was the only explorer to follow the footsteps of Henry Morton Stanley and in a documentary interviewed the two last survivors of Stanley’s expeditions from 1874 to 1890. In 1955 he also interviewed the famous nineteenth-century East African slave trader Tippu Tip’s grandson, who defended his grandfather’s trade.

 Brom’s 1957 expedition, enabled by the support of the Auto Union factory, was the basis for his bestseller 20,000 Miles in the African Jungle, which was translated into eleven languages. Brom managed to interview and film the rulers and tribes he encountered before they were decimated in the civil wars of the Congo after independence, and his historic films are now preserved in the Human Studies Film Archives of the Smithsonian Institution. Over 500 articles were published on Brom’s work on both sides of the Atlantic during his lifetime.

His dream of building a film studio in Africa never materialised - although he was well thought of and highly regarded, and was a personal advisor to Joseph Kasavubu, first president of the newly independent Congo-Léopoldville, after the assassination of Patrice Lumumba in 1961.

He died in 1969.

A book on his life was later published - Africa’s Last Romantic: The Films, Books and Expeditions of John L. Brom

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/20000miles.gif)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/brom_publicity.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 18, 2016, 10:04:24 am

On the subject of DKW's in Africa;

I cannot help but share this delightful period account (again from the English "Motorsport" magazine);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10400357_1010781528960395_1371972626148212177_n%201.jpg)

CLICK THE IMAGE FOR A LARGER VERSION

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/17%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/18%202.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12795542_1011453665559848_6566373454385909675_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1918754_602095979943339_8147763994313053510_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 19, 2016, 08:26:58 am
DKW on Österreichische Alpenfahrt Rally – 1956

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster.png)
Heinz Vetter from Vienna in a brand new 1956 DKW F93 at the starting point on 15 June 1956.

The first Austrian Alpenfahrt after the Second World War started in 1949. Until around 1965 many motorcycles also entered the Rally. The 1956 event took place on 15-17 June 1956 – the winner was Walter Schatz, in a DKW, who took the “Touring Car Class” also.  The  famous Österreichische Alpenfahrt took a gruelling route that required drivers to traverse 1,650 miles—and nineteen mountain passes.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster3.jpg)
Heinz Vetter from Vienna traverses a muddy section of Alpine road. 

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster5.jpg)
Josef Eschey from Augsburg takes a quick left hander in his 1955 model DKW F91.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster4.jpg)
Josef Schmidhofer in a DKW F91, chases another F91 up one of the 19 mountain passes on the Österreichische Alpenfahrt.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster6.jpg)
Here is an Auto Union factory entry – Hubert Brand from Ingolstadt – painting on his race number before the start of the rally. Note the added air intakes astride the grille – what were these for?

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1956Oster7.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 19, 2016, 09:16:29 am
I'm not sure how many people know that DKW's were also built in Ireland?  In any case, I'll discuss that in a future post - here is an interesting aside to it;

(From a 2012 article on "Post war Classic" 's website)

Irish built DKW & Navigator reunited after 60 years.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F89Ireland2.jpg)

Trevor Mitchell reports: "At the launch of the 2011 Cork 20 rally I met Phil o'Sullivan (seen with the car) who navigated the car in the early 50's and he recounted some great stories from those days, he was delighted to see the car again and asked me to start the car so he could hear that unique sound of the 3 cylinder 2 stroke engine once more. It is a 1953 DKW 3=6 that we have owned for many years, it is in our collection of cars here at Kilgarvan Motor Museum. It is one of the few surviving Irish assembled DKW's that were built in Cork between 1952 and 1961. The car was owned by the factory owner and it was rallied and raced successfully in the 50's and early 60's. It competed in numerous circuit of Ireland rallies as well as the Cork 20, Circuit of Munster, Ulster trophy races, Munster 100 road races as well as many local hillclimbs."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F89Ireland.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_1331156677_resized_festival_of_speed_046.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 19, 2016, 02:07:23 pm
Thoughts on Auto Union DKW in the 1958 Safari Rally;

Although by rights, an Auto Union 1000 driven by Morris Temple-Boreham and Mike Armstrong was the overall winner of the 1958 Safari Rally - no official winner was declared - due to a stink caused over a Ford Zephyr with broken shock absorber seals.  Some sources, including Mercedes-Benz themselves claim that a Mercedes 219 won the Rally!

" The sealing of vital components had been introduced in 1957, and the next year's provisional results were not confirmed until November following a protest to the RAC when the seals on the front suspension of the class-leading Ford Anglia and Ford Zephyr were found to be broken.

Initially penalised 2,000 and 1,000 points respectively, this decision was rescinded following an appeal to the Stewards who concluded that the seals had not been deliberately tampered with. Whereupon, the Mercedes and Volkswagen entrants lodged a counter protest.....

Although noteworthy for the inclusion of the first-ever overseas entries and the first all-African crews, 1958 was indubitably a non-vintage year, for although there were 54 finishers no overall winner was declared for the first and last time in the history of the Safari: E. M. Temple-Boreham/M. P. Armstrong (Auto Union) won the Leopard Class with 150 penalty points, an identical score with Lion Class leaders A.R. and K.M. Kopperud (Zephyr) around whom the great seals protest had raged.

Taking no chances on a repeat of the 1958 rumpus over seals, the organisers in 1959 not only redrafted the regulations but supplemented the seals with a special yellow, radio-active paint. A Geiger counter reading taken on application was checked after the rally making the replacement of components without detection virtually impossible"


  Auto Union, however, have always claimed the victory - and in my opinion, rightly so.

Here is one Auto Union DKW photo from that Rally;

The female crew of this 1955 DKW F-91,Mrs. EA Fjastad, Miss S. Gumoes and Miss S. Paton escaped uninjured after this mishap on the 1958 rally

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Safari1958crash.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on April 19, 2016, 02:38:59 pm
And despite that, it appears that the air bags have not deployed :laugh:
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: GolfJon on April 20, 2016, 09:32:37 am
Great thread really enjoyable read.
Found some more info on the "kastenwagen' here:
https://www.vwheritage.com/blog/2016/03/17/dkw-kastenwagen-the-vws-buss-biggest-rival/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Retail%20news%20April%20Buses&utm_content=Retail%20news%20April%20Buses+CID_bb97b8fe5a8cb87c8c67abde296dd968&utm_source=Email%20marketing%20software&utm_term=DKW%20Kastenwagen
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 20, 2016, 11:42:11 am
Thanks Brian and GolfJon - your appreciation of it motivates me to keep contributing more :)

Thanks for sharing that link GolfJon - it is interesting - although I am not sure where they got that "factory" photograph from?  DKW's were a very high quality vehicle - comparable with VW. 
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 20, 2016, 12:43:25 pm
 :P Just when you'd thought you'd seen everything DKW ..........marine applications of DKW's famous two stroke cylinder 1000cc engine;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12987020_1034081396630408_8703694862538778661_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12974284_1034082329963648_6407775658476365808_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 20, 2016, 01:16:43 pm
As part of my previous discussions on the 1956 and 58 East African Safari Rallies, herewith a collection of photographs and a small bit of text on the not-so-successful-for-Auto Union 1962 Safari.  Although still a competitive car - Auto Union 1000's were rallied in the Safari until 1965, albeit with less success than their superlative earlier years. I include some photographs from these later rallies too.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962Safari2.jpg)

(Photograph Jitze Couperus)  (It is thought that this car survived and is today in New Zealand)

The 10th East African Safari Rally was held from 19 to 23 April 1962.  Traditionally, this was considered the toughest Rally in the world, and the year 1962 was particularly difficult as there was heavy rainfall which caused mayhem around the most challenging section at the muddy Magara escarpment, near Mbulu in Tanzania. Many crews found themselves stuck in the mess that followed and subsequently retired.  There were 104 cars starting, of which 46 finished the race.
  For Auto Union, this was not their finest moment, however, and it was a disappointing race on the whole, unfortunately, compared with the strong results (and outright wins) that these cars had achieved in earlier years.  The record shows that, on the Safari Rally, the Auto Union DKW’s were excellent performers in dry, dusty conditions (their wins in 1956, 1958 and 1959), but not as successful in the wet, muddy conditions. The highest placed Auto Union was 3rd in Class B.  East African Auto Union distributors DT Dobie & Co (EA) Ltd - who also entered 5 Mercedes 220 SEs - entered several Auto Union 1000 standard saloon cars.  The Auto Union 1000S Coupe’ s entered were all private entries – of these private entries, none finished the 1962 East African Safari.

The 1962 Safari ushered in the Pat Moss-Eric Carlsson era; two of the record 33 overseas drivers were competing in the tenth rally of the series. Eric Carlsson had had a run in with the Auto Union team a few months before in the 1961 German Rally, when the Auto Union team had accused him of having a fourth gear on his SAAB (which he did not, he was only dipping the clutch in third, which made it sound like he was changing up).   His wife, Pat Moss came within an ace of an outright win at her first attempt, but Kiambu coffee farmer Tommy Fjastad and B. Schmider came through for yet another Volkswagen success – winning the 1962 Safari.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1965Safari.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1965safari3.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1965Safari2.jpg)
(Nils Fjastad and Elliot Earnshaw in an Auto Union 1000, on the 1965 East African Safari Rally. Nils Fjastad was the brother of Tommy Fjastad who won the 1962 East African Safari in a VW Beetle.)(Photographs, Ian Kinghorn)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962Safari3.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962Safari5.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962Safari4.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962Safari.jpg)
R.C.Gerrish/A.A.Coulson in an Auto Union 1000 came third in class (33rd overall) on the 1962 East African Safari Rally – beaten in Class B by (shock, horror!) two Ford Anglia’s! These stills are from a documentary film that was made about the 1962 East African Safari Rally, which was narrated by the one-and-only Raymond Baxter, this was “Hillman on Safari”.
  See the film here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxJFSTg6VNw 


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1962Safari1.jpg.png)
The Auto Union 1000 of P H Cooper and Ian Grant on the outskirts of Nairobi at the end of the 1962 East African Safari Rally.  They finished 42nd overall.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/safari%201963.jpg)
(The Auto Union 1000 of A Cloete and F Hogg starting on the 1963 East African Safari Rally. Note the canvas spare water bag looped over the front of the car - these were very popular at the time and were used as a supply of cool drinking water on long road journeys in those days) (Photographs, Ian Kinghorn)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 20, 2016, 03:12:07 pm
We discussed DKW in Ireland a few posts ago;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-jim-hennessey-dungarvan-1959.jpg)
Jim Hennesy at Dungarven - 1959

                                                         -------------------------------------------------------------------
Interestingly, the only DKW factory outside of Germany( in 1952) was in Ireland  (They were also assembled in South Africa from 1962 on), on what's now the site of Aldi supermarket in Ballincollig, County Cork.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10666017_963331083703817_4422642594317104029_n.jpg)

In 1952, Hennessy's Ltd, Motor Engineers and Importers were given the franchise to import, assemble and sell new DKW's that came to them in kit form. This company had previously imported Studebaker cars and Oliver brand tractors from the USA.
Hennessy's built and sold the full range of Dkw products, cars, motorcycles and vans and combine harvesters.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw%20ballincollig%20assembly%20plant.jpg)

 Their output was usually one car per week and the cars were sold through their showrooms in Cork City, along with full parts and service
facilities.

Irish production ceased when Volkswagen took over Auto Union in 1964.

("3rd-5th June 1958; A photo taken during the Kingdom County Fair Parade as it makes its way to the fairgrounds at the Ballymullen Barracks)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12524296_1681446848804733_9210307696101183790_n.jpg)

"June 1960; A photo taken at the Wedding of Ted Kennelly, chemist, Castleisland and Marion Kennedy, Castlecountess, Tralee, in the Church of the Immaculate Conception (St. Catherines), Tralee"
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12417965_1681451322137619_5442310544575003180_n.jpg)



Apparently, the DKW sign was still visible on the assembly premises in Ballincollig up until 2001, close to 60 years since the last car was built there.

(CLICK FOR A LARGER VERSION ON THE ARTICLE/PHOTO)


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWBallincollig.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWBallincollig2.jpg)

A lively club remains - and they are very active.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12241277_957361060967486_1053337285128400263_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/558940_608602462510016_1216578345_n.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12695013_982068801830045_5118815137531023203_o.jpg)

a number of the Irish-built cars remain on the road;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/224839_990153477688244_5665063997089524278_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 21, 2016, 09:45:05 am
A couple of posts ago we discussed the DKW Schnellaster.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4710911939_8e3ca40073.jpg)

 There is, however, much more to that story - this is a DKW that became a Mercedes-Benz, and then became a Ssangyong....and is still in production today in China.

 The Schnellaster van was also produced in Vitoria, Spain, by Industrias del Motor S.A. (IMOSA) from 1954.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-IMOSA.jpg)

 In Spain, DKW became a common term for any van, and is still used today. The Spanish subsidiary also produced a modern successor with all new bodywork, introduced in 1963 and called the DKW F1000 L.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Imosa%20F1000.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/44341088.jpg)

 This van started with the three-cylinder 981 cc two-stroke DKW engine, but later received a Mercedes-Benz Diesel engine and was finally renamed a Mercedes-Benz in 1975. Mercedes-Benz España S.A. had obtained the Vitoria factory from Industrias del Motor S.A. (IMOSA) which had been making their F1000 L van there. The F1000 L was a development of the DKW Schnellaster, but with a Mercedes-Benz diesel engine instead of the original DKW two-stroke petrol engine. The MB100 was a further development of IMOSA's F1000 L van.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/N1000.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/800px-Mercedes-Benz_MB100_front_20080704.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MB100_-140_-_Istana.png)

The MB100 was powered by a 2.4 litre diesel making about 55 kW (73 hp), an engine also used in the Mercedes Benz 207D. The SsangYong Istana is a 2, 9, 12 and 15 seat van based on the Mercedes-Benz MB100 'Bus' variant. It comes with most of the options of the MB100 as well.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/ssangyong-istana-05.jpg)

and.....believe it or not, this vehicles design lineage actually does still lie with the 1949 DKW Schnellaster!

Daimler Benz themselves provide the following story;

"Vitoria in the Basque country, is about an hour away from Bilbao. In Vitoria a group of entrepreneurs decided to establish a vehicle production facility. They founded a company called Industrias del Moto S.A. (Imosa) and won over Auto Union as partner. At the time the former company from Saxony in eastern Germany was in the process of putting down roots in western Germany with new factories. Needing all the support it could get, Auto Union granted Imosa the licence to construct the DKW F 89 L van and in turn took a 50 percent interest in Imosa. Production commenced in 1954. Typical DKW features of the van were: a two-cylinder two-stroke engine up front in the COE cab, front-wheel drive, and as load-bearing platform a tubular frame. Four metres long, the DKW had to make do with
0.7 litres displacement and 16 kW.
In 1958 the then Daimler-Benz AG took over Auto Union. In so doing, Daimler-Benz AG not only acquired ownership of the Düsseldorf plant of Auto Union, today the main Daimler van plant in Germany and home of the Sprinter, but also Auto Union's shares in Imosa and thus in the Vitoria plant. In 1963 a new model, the F 1000 L, was launched there, which continued to have the typical DKW features and boasted an exciting (by the standards of those days) body designed by the Italian bodybuilder Fissore. The influence of Daimler-Benz AG is shown, for example, in the F 1000 D, the diesel version produced starting in 1964, featuring the OM 636 with 1.8 litre displacement. This engine was based on a licensed Spanish design built by an affiliated company (Emasa).
In 1965 Daimler-Benz AG handed Auto Union over to VW, retaining the plant in Düsseldorf, but not the stake in Imosa, which was 25 percent at the time. VW in turn soon increased its stake in Imosa to 75 percent. Neither Imosa (VW) nor Emasa (Daimler-Benz) turned out to be models of individual success, however. And so the two candidates tried their hand at it together, merging the individual companies into a new business called Mevosa. Written out, the name was long: “Compania Hispano Alemana de Productos Mercedes-Benz y Volkswagen S.A.” As early as 1976, however, VW got out of the company, and during the next few years Daimler-Benz AG became majority owner of the Spanish company in several stages.
In the meantime, for several years Vitoria had been producing the large T2 vans called “Düsseldorfer”; from 1975 it built the N 1000/N 1300 vans – with the exception of the Brazilian trucks the first vehicles from Mercedes-Benz with the three-pointed star to originate outside Germany. The two-stroke engine belonged to the past, but the basic design – front-mounted engine in the cab, front-wheel drive and tubular frame – could be traced directly back to DKW.
The successor series, the first generation of the MB 90 to MB 180, featured the same basics. Outside Spain this model series was largely unknown, but that was to change with the next generation in 1986: the new series MB 100 through MB 180 D was offered in Germany (as MB 100 D in two wheelbases) and other countries. Maximum
3.5 tonnes GVW, pre-chamber diesel engine with 2.4 litres displacement and 53 kW – known in the car sector as the legendary, indestructible “taxi diesel” from the 240 D – these were the hallmarks of the new series. The engine was positioned, unchanged, up front in the COE cab, and front-wheel drive and tubular frame were the other familiar parameters."


There is, naturally, a final twist to the story -

"In 1969 the DKW van was manufactured under licence by IASFe (Industrias Automotriz de Santa Fe) in Argentina, though for only one year, after producing the "Schnellaster" the previous 10 years, the factory had closed its doors, but IME (Industrias Mecánicas del Estado) continued its production as the Rastrojero Frontalito F 71 / SM 81 from 1969 until 1979 in Pickup, Minibus and Van versions."

Here is an IME Rastrojero Frontalito F 71 ;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/RD%20F71%2001.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 21, 2016, 09:58:36 am
The Falcon-DKW

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Falcon-DKW.jpg)

Falcon Shells was founded in 1956 by Peter Pellandine following his amicable split with Keith Waddington of Ashley Laminates. It was originally based at 23 Highbridge Street, Waltham Abbey in Essex. From 1957 to 1959 Falcons were also manufactured in New Zealand by Falcon Shells (NZ) Limited. Pellandine had moved here in 1957, while continuing to operate his United Kingdom company. The New Zealand company ceased production in 1959 when Pellandine returned to the United Kingdom.

In 1958, a full kit version of the Mark 2, renamed the Competition, was launched. In 1959, an all-new model was added to the range. The Mark 3, later the Caribbean, became Falcon's best selling shell.

In 1962 renowned DKW-tuner, Albrecht Mantzel looked upon the Falcon Caribbean as a possible "junior-GT proposition"
Discussions with Auto Union led to a Caribbean shell being mated with a DKW Junior chassis, a Mantzel-tuned prototype reaching 106 m.p.h. The car was well received and performed well - but remained unique.  Mantzel moved his ideas on to Ginetta and soon designed a DKW powered Ginetta G4 (renamed the G6).  More on the Ginetta-DKW's later though.

As the result of a slump in sales, Falcon Cars was wound up in 1964.

"Motorsport" magazine reported this in April 1963;

"Falcon Cars have been supplying glass fibre body shells for some years and have reached a high standard of finish with such bodies as the Competition and the Caribbean, the Competition being an open 2-seater which was also available as a complete car with multi-tubular space frame while the Caribbean was normally supplied for fitting to the Ford 10 chassis. Although these two shells are still available Falcon are now concentrating on the new 515 model which was introduced at the Racing Car Show. However, discussions have been going on for a long time with Auto Union with a view to marketing a D.K.W. Junior chassis mated to a Caribbean body shell. So far no decision has been reached but a Mantzel tuned prototype has been timed at 106 m.p.h. The main problem lies in the need to give the D.K.W. chassis more torsional stiffness, the lack of it causing the doors to pop open at inconvenient times."


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/falcon_shells-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 21, 2016, 05:22:55 pm
Tony Brooks, the British Formula one driver , also known as the "racing dentist" participated in 39 Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on 14 July 1956, achieving six wins, 10 podium finishes and 75 career points. He also scored the first win by a British driver in a British car in a Grand Prix since 1923, in 1955 driving a Connaught at Syracuse in a non-World Championship race.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/57NUR1000TB.jpg)

However - his career is longer than that...... (to quote a 2013 interview with Brooks) "After a dozen meetings in the Healey a fellow racer, Arthur Hely, lent him his much quicker Frazer Nash Le Mans Replica, and he began to attract attention, scoring top-three finishes against the likes of Roy Salvadori and Archie Scott Brown. The Aldington brothers at AFN, the Frazer Nash operation at Isleworth, were also DKW importers, and offered Tony a saloon drive at the 1954 May Silverstone. He won his class, which led to a works Sebring Frazer Nash ride in the Tourist Trophy at Dundrod."

 In 1955 he had good success with a DKW 3=6 F91 Sonderklasse.Tony competed in three Production Car races in a DKW that belonged to Mr. Aldington (the owner of Frazer Nash Sports Cars). The dates were 7 May 1955(Silverstone), 27 Aug. and 24 Sept. (both at Oulton Park). The story of his class-win at Oulton Park (and fourth overall) was recounted as follows (note especially the kind of cars he was competing against!);

"
Blue skies and sunshine prevailed on the morning of August 27th for the International Trophy Meeting at Oulton Park.
The Sporting Life Production Saloon Car Race, very interesting in view of the fact that such drivers as Leston, Moss, Hawthorn, Collins, Gelberg and Wharton were putting very ordinary saloons, in some cases, to the test. From start to finish J. Bonnier, from Sweden, led the race in his 1900 Alfa-Romeo, a fast car and well driven, followed for some time by Wharton in an Austin Westminster and Hawthorn in a Ford Zephyr; these two were constantly changing places in the earlier laps but when Hawthorn retired halfway through the race with piston trouble things steadied down a bit. Wharton kept second place, with Foster's M.G. Magnette third and Tony Brooks, who made astounding progress, held on to fourth place in his DKW Sonderklasse. Farther down the line Moss could be seen driving a Standard Ten with great vigour, creeping up from ninth to fifth position; two 1100 Fiats were making light work of the corners; and nearly last, but not least in personality anyway, came Hill's green Renault R 1063, which received applause from the spectators as it tried desperately to catch Threlfall's Standard Ten, the Renault appearing to be much steadier on corners although both ears were only a few yards apart from each other throughout the entire race. Results were: 1100 cc class, Tony Brooks (DKW); 1600 cc, A. T. Foster (MG Magnette); and unlimited, Joakim Bonnier (Alfa Romeo), 67.57 mph.
(© Motor Sport October 1955) "


Here he is in the F91 at Silverstone on 7 May 1955;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Silverstone-DailyExpress-May1955_RA871-TonyBrooks-DKW.jpg.small.jpg)

Audi provided their own 3=6 racer for a 2008 Tribute to Tony Brooks at Goodwood - Brooks was suitably impressed - ""Goodwood put on a tribute for me at the Revival in 2008, which was very nice of them, and it was good to see most of the cars I'd ever raced lined up, from the Healey Silverstone onwards. I've never been in the least tempted to try historic racing: when I see the cars turn out, often in better condition than when we raced them, with better tyres and very high mechanical standards, I say good luck to them."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-3-6-Sonderklasse-14168.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 22, 2016, 10:00:13 am
The Konrad Baecker Magnetic piston motor - based on a DKW 3=6 engine
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/KonradBaecker.gif)
 
Konrad Baecker first patented this modified DKW 3=6 engine in 1988, and sporadically demonstrated it.  The intention was to design something that would eventually be able to achieve "over unity" or perpetual motion.
 
 The DKW engine presented itself well to this conversion, firstly as a two stroke, there was no extraneous equipment or oil system, the sealed roller bearing crank was ideal, as well as the triple-contact-breaker distributor worked well to switch the electromagnets. Also, of course, it was small enough to sit on a work bench and quite easy to work with size-wise.
 
Due to the limitations of magnets that were commercially available at that time, the motor has not been developed further.
                                   ------------------------------------------
 
With this "magnet conversion", normal car motors can be converted to run on "magnet power".

He was using Iron cores with an electromagnet inside the iron tube.
The piston magnet is sucked into the iron tube and when the electromagnet is
energized, the piston magnet is pushed out of the iron tube.

In 1988 he was still driving the electromagnets via contact points from a car battery. It was, at that time, using around 12 Volts and 20 amps pulses to switch the electromagnets.
 With a better neodymium  magnets this could be powered much longer and possibly be the basis for something that could, eventually achieve "overunity".
 
There is a video available on the internet of this engine being run
 
- http://youtu.be/vsmP82eYOpc

 
( the German language intro to the video is about 4 minutes long, and the engine may be seen running at about 4 mins into the video).
 
In Herr Baecker's own words (from his patent wording and roughly translated);
 
" The force which is required to operate this motor is achieved in that the magnetic piston is ejected from the magnet head (long force path). In order to make it possible to eject the piston from the head at all, the piston must either be pressed into the head using hydraulic force or the magnetic field of the head must be neutralised or destroyed by a powerful current surge. Both possibilities are thus unrealistic. In the case of the magnet head which I have developed, an iron conducting element having an excitation winding is located in the upper part. Resting on one side and on the opposite side with an air gap [sic]. The magnetic force thus remains fully effective downwards. In the event of a small amount of current flowing through the excitation winding, the magnetic field is immediately drawn into the upper circle (auxiliary circle) and the path for the piston becomes free. This switching can be repeated as desired and the full force of the magnet head is maintained. A transistor circuit, in the case of which only small currents flow via the distributor or interrupter, increases the life of the circuit.
 
The invention relates to an engine of the Otto engine design and whose pistons can be moved by magnetic force.

It is known that electric motors have been for generations moved by means of magnetic force.

Some inventors of modern times have also tried to use the power of electrical and permanent magnets for the drive of so-called magnet motors.

All of these engines theory would perhaps move (rotate), but never have the strength to drive a car, for example, a turbine or a ship.

The theory with magnets which attract or repel to create a rotating or stroke each other is very old and does not need to be re-invented.

For two or more blunt merged the magnets repelling or attracting force of the road is just too weak and too short for a viable continuous force to gain perpetual motion.

All roads lead here, necessarily, to our good old electric motor, but unfortunately this also requires energy from the power outlet again.

Even at this time fueled internal combustion engines have the disadvantage that they must be fed to the barrel and thus force generation becoming increasingly scarce and expensive fuels.

The combustion emissions are freely exhausted have a lot of highly toxic gases that endanger the natural environment.

The noise is another major problem.

Function
The invention is thus designed to reduce operating costs to a minimum and to solve our energy and environmental problems for all time.

Solution
This object is achieved in that the piston of this engine to be moved by magnetic force. This force is amplified by a crankshaft for driving forward.

The only repulsive effect of two or more magnets but not enough to gain the necessary for a driving force.

The force is determined by the discharging of the magnetic piston from the magnetic head reaches (long path of force).

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/t4.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 22, 2016, 10:40:57 am
DKW based racing cars - the "Zink Petit";

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/hmspecials63.jpg)

(The Zink Petit is no 87 on this photograph from 1963)

                                                                     ---------------------------------

Edward Zink started his racing career at the dirt ovals of Tennessee and North Carolina in the 1950s. In 1962 Zink designed and built his first road racing car, the Zink Petit. The Zink Petit was a racing car built according to SCCA H-Modified class. The car made its debut at the SCCA National Championship Runoffs in 1960. Tommy van Hoosier failed to finish at Daytona International Raceway. Bill Greer won the most prestigious SCCA race in the H-Modified class in 1963. The first car used Jabro body work and was powered by an 850cc DKW engine which was specially purchased from the factory and prepared by nobody less than Albrecht Mantzel. At the time it was one of five racing engines imported into the US.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Zink_turning.jpg)

There were 3 built in all. Ed Zink followed these cars up with the "Z-4" which was also DKW-engined (later Coventry Climax powered).

They were quite successful overall in racing in the USA - and allegedly could reach 135 mph! (see newspaper article below)

Ed Zink died in 2003.

(CLICK ON THE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE FOR A LARGER, READABLE VERSION)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/newpaper.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/germanmag.jpg)

(Close-up of the DKW powerplant installed in the "Zink Petit")
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/mk3-1.jpg)

A copy of the letter of thanks that Ed Zink sent Auto Union in 1964 (CLICK ON EACH PAGE FOR A LARGER, READABLE VERSION)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/edltr1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/edltr2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/edltr3.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 22, 2016, 12:41:13 pm
The 1965 Roof of Africa Rally - the first "real" off-road race in the world....

To quote from "Inside Motorcycles" - "The Roof of Africa Rally is the granddaddy of extreme off-road racing in Africa, and perhaps the world, having first run in 1965— 13 years before the Paris-Dakar started.

It is one of five global extreme enduros, and its various routes over the years have always included very difficult terrain across the northern part of Lesotho, a small mountainous kingdom that is entirely surrounded by South Africa, and is known as the “Roof of Africa”

South African race/rally legend Coenraad Spamer won a class win on the first Roof of Africa Rally in 1965 in a 1962 Auto Union 1000S - allegedly beating factory teams (we'll discuss Coenraad Spamer further in a future post).

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/coenroof_1.jpg)

After Lesotho received some international funding in the early 1960's, Bob Phillips was involved in building a road up the Moteng track from Butha Buthe to ease access to the inner regions of Lesotho. As the road neared completion, Bob told his friend Louis Duffet of the RAC that he had built the world's worst road. Duffet took it to the Sports Car Club where John Buttress was tasked to organize a Rally.

The first Roof of Africa Rally, held in 1965, is an event about which little detail has been written over the years. The 1965 event, starting in Johannesburg saw crews travelling down to Butha Buthe where they entered Lesotho and proceeded over the Moteng Pass to Oxbow, the diamond diggings at Letseng Le Terai and on to Tlokoeng. They joined the Mokhotlong-Sani Pass road and travelled down the Sani Pass and finished in Durban. The legendary Jan Hettema won the inaugural event in a standard Volvo.

Today, the tarred road from Oxbow to Mokhotlong follows the original ‘Roof of Africa’ rally route through spectacular mountain ranges and over Tlaeeng Pass – Lesotho’s highest at 3 275 metres. Mokhotlong, which was founded as a police post, is the district headquarters of one of the most remote and isolated areas in Lesotho.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: 00quattro00 on April 23, 2016, 11:47:16 pm
http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/wrecked-cars/auction-1073674067.htm
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 27, 2016, 04:53:38 pm
Thanks for the link - that is Graham Wiblin's ex 1000S four door from Blenheim (ex-Dargaville before that) - now having lost its tags and running gear. :'(

Hope it finds a good home!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on April 30, 2016, 04:50:43 pm
Ohh here's some more;

a 1000S four door for sale in Christchurch (if anyone on here does take it, please contact me to get some proper hubcaps!)

http://www.aa.co.nz/cars/cars-for-sale/search/audi/a1/307365/

a very nice Hobby Scooter;

http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/motorbikes/motorbikes/classic-vintage/auction-1070022794.htm

and an Auto Union F103 Audi - although very rusty;

http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/used-cars/audi/auction-1077848943.htm

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Worms on April 30, 2016, 09:53:24 pm
A guy at work has one of those scooters.... of course he paid under $100 for it... it's...errr... rough  ;D
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 02, 2016, 09:32:52 am
Nice Worms!  I had one too - although it was a nice Scooter - there is only so much fun you can have on 49cc!

I've been so busy with other things this week, I haven't had time for a proper update.

Today I'll tell you about the 1955 DKW-Wendler Spyder;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_F91_Sport_Kabriolet_Wendler-1953.jpg)

During the 1950s, several European car manufacturers decided to take advantage of the prosperous post-war American economy by entering the U.S. car market. Can’t blame them: The rise of the middle class during the middle of the century meant that many Americans were buying second cars for the first time and led to the practice of buying a new car every three or four years. Yet Detroit still commanded a chokehold on the market, making penetration into the US market difficult, if not impossible, for foreign manufacturers.

In this game - one man shone out - Peter Satori, a dealer from Pasadena, California, he specialized in non-American cars of all types from about 1954 through 1980 from his dealership on West Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena. Of one of these, he was a great exponent of DKW/Auto Union cars.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Satori.jpg)

In 1955 he imported a lightweight aluminium bodied DKW Spyder bodied by Karosseriebau Wendler (they also bodied the Porsche 550) into the USA.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/porsche_spyder_wendler_body_badges.jpg)

  The car attracted some attention - not the least because Satori used it as his own car for some time.  Articles were published about it in Road and Track magazine in June 1955 and other magazines.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/wendlerdkw.png)

Although of completely conventional underpinnings, it was reputedly 300lbs lighter than the DKW F91 on which it was based, and was, as a result of the weight reduction and aerodynamics, some 10 mph faster.

The staggering thing though was the asking price - US $ 5600 - which was a lot of money in 1955, in fact that was a cost increase of $3500 over the purchase price of a standard saloon DKW!

It was reported, at the time, that the cars would be built "on order".  It is not certain how many were made or what happened to the original car that was driven by Peter Satori.


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3b8025b8-e2f0-46cb-9145-76088283e863-big-teaser.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13178682_1050749308296950_6249793742717624776_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13178935_1050749481630266_8654623926696365902_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13164378_1050749461630268_3438969208995164922_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 02, 2016, 12:58:22 pm
Earlier on, I made reference to the DKW engined Ginetta G6.  The official designation of this car is, in fact, the Ginetta G6, however it is known by a large variety of monikers - Ginetta G4 Mantzel, Ginetta-DKW etc..

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Ginetta.png)

To carry on from the previous discussion a few pages back about the Falcon-DKW;

 Albrecht Mantzel, after having had little success with the Falcon-DKW, due to Falcon's own problems, decided to continue his "Baby-GT" vision with the Walklett Brothers of "Ginetta", installing a DKW 900cc engine into a Ginetta G4.

This car proved very successful in performance terms, with its tweaked 3 cylinder, two stroke 900cc engine and a ZF gearbox it could do 117mph.  It was thus known as the Ginetta G6. The only issue was....it was, as all other two strokes are...very thirsty.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/g06.jpg)

One of these cars was entered in the 1963 Nürburgring 1000km with Mantzel's son Wolf-Dieter taking turns at the driving with Peter Ruby.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_Nurburgring-1963-05-19.jpg)

Although the car showed incredible performance, and was quite remarkable in almost every respect - it dropped out "DNF" (Did Not Finish) due to fuel starvation...

A few more G6's were built (I'm not actually sure how many), and were by all accounts great cars performance wise, the project ran out of steam with Auto Union's financial troubles through 1964 and 65 having some effect.

HERE IS THE MANTZEL/RUBY DKW POWERED GINETTA G6 ON THE NURBURGRING 1000KM ON 19 MAY 1963

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/GinettaG61963.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 03, 2016, 08:54:34 am
The DKW-Schai Special;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/78prem.jpg)

The shape of the bodywork was inspired by the Lotus 23 at the time. The casual observer will notice the individual wheels, or Fiat  front and DKW at the rear. We do not know which spare wheel was adopted for road use!
                                                        ------------------------------------------
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/78histo.jpg)

In the early '60's, Swiss racing driver Toni Schai was driving  a Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint in national races.  He desperately wanted to drive a "real" race car, but his financial resources did not allow it the aquisition of one. The young architect then undertook the construction of a car, to his liking, by first collecting parts.

He chose the front end from a Fiat 600 and the complete mechanicals from a DKW Junior, or engine, gearbox, front suspension, all attached to the front of the DKW chassis. He planned to install this set on the back of the car, thereby creating a mid-engined car. The next step was to draw up the plans of the car scale 1: 1, this, he apparently drew on the walls of his apartment!  The tubular chassis was built by a friend  while Toni undertook himself to mould the body of fibreglass and resin. From 1964, the car was involved in many national events where it appeared regularly.  It often won the "850cc" category. It must be said, though, that in the meantime, the original engine was replaced by a Mantzel "stage 3" engine of about 100 hp, while the transverse leaf spring front gave way to springs + telescopic shock absorbers of formula 3 style. Road holding was apparently "sensational", helped by a curb weight of around 430 kg.

The sporting career of Toni and his DKW Special continued until 1970 when he sold the car to concentrate on the construction of his house.

The car was restored, from a parlous condition in 1996 - and is still active today.
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/78restchass.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/img4725ca8c49373.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/8859CB37CDC6248201CCC39B4CFD44B3.jpeg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on May 03, 2016, 10:11:08 am
Not the cleanest radiator installation I have ever seen although the airflow should be OK :)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 04, 2016, 07:55:37 am
I have to agree with you there Brian!  Still - I guess it works OK...

To carry on a little bit from my post a few pages back regarding the DKW F102, which was well loved in New Zealand, I'd like to share the transition of the F102 to the F103 with you.  The F103 was, of course, the car that became known, in 1965, as the "Audi".

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2198862080_aa5943c177_o.jpg)

Audi history mostly describes the transition of the F102 to the F103 as "mutated", a term I honestly rather dislike.  Many articles, some written as recently as a few days ago ( see this one: http://news.boldride.com/2016/05/mercedes-made-audi-into-what-it-is-today/103663/ ) make a pretence that the F102 was a bad car.  Certainly this was not the case! The F102 was actually a great car to drive - unfortunately hurt by its two stroke reputation - but a good performer and reliable and...aside from the engine, a modern car - there really was, essentially, nothing wrong with it.

The assertion that the F102 was only a Mercedes W118 with a two stroke motor and minor styling changes is also factually incorrect.

However - all that said, by the middle of 1964 it was evident that the F102, nice car as it was, was a sales disaster - and disharmony in Auto Union management was at an all time high - with Mercedes looking to divest themselves of the lot (by the end of 1964 Volkswagen had bought Auto Union).  The proposal went to Bertone to restyle the F102 (the project was not yet the F103, but a development of the F102) - this was the revised DKW F102 Bertone presented (note the sticker in the rear window "Der Grosser DKW F102" );

Familiar - No?

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/a3c5260dd66305c3aab808de595cb8af.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/69a8f5ed9a0b0b5254535c7a45d2599e.jpg)

Several sources incorrectly identify the car above as an F103 - it is not so.  It is an F102.

Of course - very quickly, the styling was tweaked, and the already planned insertion of the 1700cc Mercedes M118 "Mitteldruckmotor" engine went ahead. On 1 January 1965 Auto Union officially became the property of Volkswagenwerk Gmbh, and the new car was renamed as the "Audi" - a prewar part of Auto Union.  The car remained, at first anyway, the "Auto Union F103" with the name "Audi".

Since the chassis on the F103 was taken from the DKW F102 with a 3-cylinder two-stroke engine, the longer engine meant that the cooling system had to be offset to the left of the engine instead of the normal position in front of it. Because of the radiator’s location, the front cylinder of the engine had a tendency to run cooler than the other three and as a consequence the spark plug tended to foul up, particularly if the engine was often used in city traffic. To avoid this, it was often recommended to run a hotter spark plug (with a lower heat range) in the front cylinder than in the other three.

 They were nicknamed the Mitteldruckmotor (medium-pressure engines) because of their unusually high BMEP (mean effective pressure, as calculated from brake torque) values, which led to a good thermodynamic efficiency. The engines had spiral-formed intake channels that gave the fuel-air mixture a good swirl. The engine had Heron-type combustion chambers with broad squish bands, further enhancing the mixture swirl and aiding good combustion. These features made it possible to use very high compression ratios for the time. The initial engine version had a CR of 11.2 to 1 for 98 RON fuel and even the engines intended for 92 RON fuel had a CR of 9 to 1, which was a very unusually high value for the time.

The resulting car - although of the same horsepower (initially) as the DKW F102 it replaced, was a sales success, and the fields of unsold cars were a thing of the past.;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1965_Audi_60_001_4156.jpg)

The marketeers were quick to remove DKW and Auto Union from the brand consciousness - and for many years Audi cut the years 1949 - 1964 from their history entirely (see my friend Paul Markham's excellent blog for his article on the F103 here : http://heinkelscooter.blogspot.co.nz/2013/10/audi-f103.html ) .  If post war DKW's were mentioned - it was with derision and anything DKW was treated with Pariah-like aversion.

A lot of this persists today, unfortunately.

Overnight DKW owners were like Lepers - the new Auto Union (soon renamed "Audi") got rid of anything DKW as quickly as possible.  Parts and servicing support ceased for DKW cars shortly thereafter.

In some countries (such as South Africa) private individuals bought all the DKW stock from the Auto Union/Audi dealerships and luckily for us - the majority of this has remained preserved.

Later (rather recently actually), Audi themselves bought much of this stock back (someone told me the majority from South America?) - and now support DKW cars through the "Audi Tradition" shop - see here: http://trshop.audi.de/konakart/SelectCat.do?catId=112&prodsFound=-1&category=DKW+Auto+Union and in the year 2000 opened a new Audi Museum at Ingolstadt - which has gone some way to improving the once Pariah status of DKW.

The Tradition Shop went online in 2010 ( see the press release here; https://www.audi-mediacenter.com/en/press-releases/audi-tradition-online-shop-for-spare-parts-3718 )


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 04, 2016, 09:40:20 am
I've often heard people say that they did not know that there were DKW cars in New Zealand, or that they don't remember seeing them in the '50's and '60s.  Mmmmm - just the other day I ran across this 1967 copy of "The Manapouri Messenger" - just look how many second hand Deeks Crosbies in Invercargill had for sale!  There were quite a few.  Note especially the station wagon - that would have been a private import.

CLICK ON THE ARTICLE FOR A LARGER, READABLE VERSION , OF COURSE

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/20160504084554354_0001%201.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 04, 2016, 11:00:21 am
The Costin-DKW (known as the Costin Ultra Low Drag Vehicle)

Legendary designer Frank Costin advanced monocoque chassis design and was instrumental in adapting aircraft aerodynamic knowledge for automotive use.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/18d3v58qa1b9yjpg.jpg)

This was the fifth car designed by Frank Costin and named by Frank's project number "Auto".

To quote from Motorsport magazine September 1984

"Auto V — 1962. The Ultra Low Drag Vehicle commissioned by TVR with a view to production. The construction became Costin's hallmark for the next few years: a wooden monocoque, all round independent suspension, disc brakes on all four wheels, and light tubular subframe sections fore and aft. A bench seat took three people (statistically, an average passenger load), the wooden tear-drop body had a veneer of fibreglass to improve finish and, powered by a DKW engine giving less than 35 bhp, the car was so slippery that it could exceed 100 mph. "Drag coefficient?" asks Frank, "I've never quoted them. It's just a current buzz word, meaning whatever people want it to mean. Aircraft men laugh at those quoted nowadays."

The prototype was startling in appearance and suffered from cooling and ventilation problems — Costin says he used too much glass in it. Having spent £7,000 on the project, a tiny amount by any standards. TVR decided not to spend any more. Given Costin's track record as regards cooling, the prototype could doubtless have been made to work and it was probably the car's unusual shape which caused the board to have cold feet. "


The car is still around;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15093005150120484313621795.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15093005123220484313621789.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: vonripsnorter on May 04, 2016, 12:34:50 pm
I've often heard people say that they did not know that there were DKW cars in New Zealand, or that they don't remember seeing them in the '50's and '60s.
Love your posts re the History of DKW & the NZ connection
Just last week I saw a picture of the Christchurch Cathedral. The picture was taken some time in the 60's & most wouldn't notice, but you could clearly see a DKW SP1000 Coupe driving passed .
Now I must admit , I did not know any of those made it to NZ  ;D   

Now please excuse me if you have already mentioned it ( I have only just today discovered this awesome thread)
But is there any connection between the DKW Junior & the East German Trabant ? 
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 05, 2016, 10:50:52 am
Thanks Vonripsnorter! :)

In short - aside from very early ancestry, and the fact that DKW invented Duroplast before the war, there is no link between the DKW Junior and the Trabant.  They do have a passing resemblance though;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/92b7c7738dac0a2a49ba0f0a44ebbc45.jpg)

  In a design sense they are completely unrelated cars - developed independently of each other.

My good friend in Australia, Paul Markham wrote an excellent article on the evolution of the Trabant here:

http://heinkelscooter.blogspot.co.nz/2014/01/trabant-east-german-peoples-car.html

In my humble opinion though - the DKW Junior was a very much superior product - featuring such niceties as inboard brakes.34 bhp (8 more than the Trabant anyway...), the relative refinement of a three cylinder engine over the  two cylinder, also, it was better made and, in my opinion, more attractively styled.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 05, 2016, 11:26:04 am
Road and Track magazine's "Pressmobile";

Road & Track (often abbreviated R&T) magazine was founded by two friends, Wilfred H. Brehaut, Jr. and Joseph S. Fennessy, in 1947, in Hempstead, New York, USA.

After a downpour at the 1955 Pebble Beach road races, the staff at Road & Track decided that they needed a vehicle to serve as a combination mobile office, galley, and bunk for future West Coast races. They looked at a Wells Cargo trailer and a Ford wagon; a Fiat Multipla; a Volkswagen Kombi (bus); a Chrysler Town & Country wagon; and Alfa Romeo’s “Romeo” Camper. But what they actually bought for their new “Pressmobile,” as it said on the side, was a DKW 3=6 "Schnellaster".

DKW had been the largest European motorcycle manufacturer before World War II, and it was a two-stroke specialist, so it was little surprise that their 3=6 followed the trend. Even the name, “3 equals 6”, is a subtle boast about the power plant, which has three cylinders that give the performance of a small six. Volkswagen’s Micro Bus, however, was probably the closest competitor. At the time, it would have been notably smaller and lighter and correspondingly less expensive. The DKW made up for its weight disadvantage with 42 horsepower and 57 foot-pounds of torque, yielding “enough ‘steam’ to pull a much heavier Karavan along at a better rate,” said Road & Track. They also noted that the torquey, high-revving two-stroke would burn rubber in first gear, while also being able to cruise comfortably at 60 mph. Its best quality, however, was its handling on the open road, “which can only be described as amazing.” Add tremendous reliability—one tune-up and a single loose wire in Road & Track’s first 9,000 miles were the only work required—and ahead-of-its-time features, like a curbside door with five feet eight inches of headroom, a flat floor, and front-wheel drive, and the DKW is a look forward at the minivans that were to come decades later.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/rtmobile.jpg)

Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, 1956.


In December 1956 Road and Track did a comparative test on the VW and the DKW;

 CLICK ON THE IMAGE FOR A LARGER VERSION

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/RoadTrack_edited.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/RoadTrack001_edited.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/RoadTrack002_edited.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/RoadTrack003_edited.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 05, 2016, 12:59:43 pm
Emerson Fittipaldi and DKW

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/GTMalzoni1.jpg)

The story goes that, aged just twelve, Emerson Fittipaldi took his parents DKW for a drive while on a family outing - and crashed it, writing the car off.

Some years later - aged 20 he raced a DKW Malzoni in the 1000 mile Interlagos race in 1966. Emmerson and team mate Jan Balder failed to win the classic race when they ran out of fuel with one lap to go and had to stop for a splash down. In this photo, Emerson clad in his helmet and gloves helps with the refueling while Jan Balder sat at the wheel. The future World Champion reportedly burst into tears after the chequered flag, So close and yet so far....

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/45bcd4084dd42fd1a71cd067ca2d083e.jpg)

He did however, show what the Malzoni was capable of....

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/GTMalzoni5.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 06, 2016, 08:44:24 am
The "Peoples Car" - DKW Junior production in India - a stillborn project.

Today, the Indian Tata company is well known worldwide.  This industrial giant is today known as an automaker of some experience.  Back in the 1950's though, this was not the case.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/tata_group_logo_3053.gif)

Although they had been in existence since 1868 and manufacturing trucks since the 1951, and railway locomotives earlier than that, TELCO (Tata Engineering and Locomotive COmpany) had greater aspirations.  Its Chairman, French-born Indian JRD Tata was a car enthusiast and aviator (he had obtained his pilots licence in 1929 and started Tata Airlines in 1932) - he bought a Bugatti Type 35A when he was just 21 years old.

JRD Tata (Born 1904, Paris - Died 1993, Switzerland)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/07book4.jpg)

In fact, "JRD" as he was known, had always wanted to build cars.  Almost immediately after the Indian Independence he went to Germany to see Ferry Porsche to negotiate the building of an Indian "People's Car", and before most other people did, he recognised the potential of the Volkswagen Beetle.  This, however, could not reach fruition - not through any fault of either JRD or Porsche - but rather bureaucracy.

The 1951 enactment of the "Industries Act" in India meant that TELCO were issued licences for manufacture.  In this case, it was deemed by the Indian Government that truck manufacture was the most pressing need, and thus TELCO were granted a licence to build trucks. Motor manufacture had to take a backseat for the moment, as it were, for TELCO anyway.  However, this provided a working relationship with Daimler Benz of Germany - and soon TELCO were building Mercedes-Benz L-311 trucks.

In 1959 the people's car idea came back in India - when an Indian Government appointed a committee to put out for proposals and idea for a cheaper "people's car" for Indians.  This placed TELCO in a good position - they had an excellent working relationship with Daimler-Benz, who at that time owned 87% of Auto Union Gmbh.

DKW Cars were known in India - and were sold and widely promoted before World War 2

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Bombay%20Cycle%20and%20Motor%20Agency%201937%20DKW%20Large.jpg)



Tribesmen admire the DKW Meisterklasse of Paul Hartlmaier on his expedition in India 1935/1936

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HI080045_1000.jpg)

 TELCO were then amongst the first to submit a proposal - they proposed to build the DKW Junior, a car then fresh into production in Europe, bang-up-to-date and well-supported by their partners Daimler-Benz.  The plan showed great promise. A planned sale price of Rs 6950- was competitive.  The project moved ahead with some speed....

However TELCO were not granted a licence to build cars....however excellent the proposal was, Indian law at that time allowed only three car manufacturing licences - and these were taken up already.  Despite significant initial investment in the project, Tata's days of car manufacture were in the future - and not able to be realised in 1959.  Many have speculated on what it could have meant if this project had gone ahead.  Would the massive Indian market have changed Auto Union's fortunes and the path that led them into the arms of Volkswagen in 1965?  We'll never know.

Here is an excerpt from a book 'Horizons - the Tata India Century - 1904 2004' by Aman Nath & Jay Vithalani with Tulsi Vatsal

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/01.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: vonripsnorter on May 06, 2016, 09:37:23 am
Wow, Just imagine how different things would have been if this did go ahead & was a success . What a very different car industry we would have today.
Mercedes would have been more reluctant to sell it (Auto-Union) as it could have been very profitable , but imagine how different Audi would be today & most likely would never have moved upmarket as it was VW that wanted a 'premium' brand to compete with the likes of Mercedes.

Even VW would have been a very different company if they had not acquired Auto-Union , if a company at all by now as things were very dire for them back in the late 60's early 70's .
Would we have even had the Golf as we know it today & we would never have seen the Passat etc ( which was simply an Audi 80 in a different body )

Would we have ever had or seen 'quattro' ? I doubt it . Mercedes would have kept the brand 'below' their own premium brand as not to compete & to be honest, Mercedes don't have a greatest reputation for management of their sub-brands so it would be also possible that by now, the 4 rings would have been completely consigned to the history books even decades ago .

I think after reading that interesting post AutoUnioNZ , that we can be thankful that TELCO were not granted a licence to build cars . It would have been very possible that we would not even have VW , let alone Audi as we know today     
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 06, 2016, 02:42:56 pm
So true...I suppose there are many such "what if" stories out there... You make a good point Vonripsnorter! The Volkwagen group as we know it would not exist today I suppose (or at least in the form we know it) had things panned out differently.  Who knows - Auto Union may have then earlier seen the light to go with four stroke power?  It has been written many times too, that the history of Audi/Auto Union is one of the most interesting and convoluted stories out there in the motor industry - I have to say, I agree.

I have always felt though, that the postwar history of the company before 1965 was sorely neglected and oft skipped.  I'll make my little contribution to telling some of it.

                                                                          ---------------------------------------------
I hinted in an earlier post that many famous people drove DKW's.  I have already dealt with a few.  Now I'll mention another - German aviatrix and , in a smaller sense, Auto Union personality Elly Beinhorn.

A face that tells a story - Elly later in life
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/image-fotoshowImage-9498055c-209536.jpg)

Elly Beinhorn-Rosemeyer (30 May 1907 – 28 November 2007) was a German aviatrix - referred to as “one of the most daring women of the 20th century” on the inside cover of her autobiography Alleinflug (Solo Flight).  She was the wife of prewar Auto Union racing superstar Bernd Rosemeyer. Her flying adventures are truly something here is one example -

"Long distance flying was her real passion and in 1931 she seized the opportunity to fly to Portuguese Guinea (now Guinea-Bissau) West Africa on a scientific expedition. On the return journey, engine failure resulted in a crash-landing in the Sahara. With the help of nomadic Tuareg tribesmen, Elly joined a camel caravan to Timbuktu. She subsequently returned to the crash site to recover parts of the plane. Word of her plight reached the French authorities and they sent a military two-seater plane to collect her.

In April 1931, fully recovered, she was able to fly herself back to Berlin to a warm reception from the crowds."


She visited New Zealand with her Klemm KL20 aircraft in 1932, while on her "Around the World Flight". The flight took her via southern Asia to Port Darwin in Australia, where she boarded a ship to Panama via New Zealand. From Panama she flew via the Cordilleras to the east coast of South America, arriving in Buenos Aires on July 23, 1932. She did not fly the Klemm in New Zealand, but had it shipped to Panama, where she resumed her flying Odyssey. The  AHSNZ Journal describes her visit to Masterton thus - ""She slipped quietly out of the sky over Masterton. The wheels of her little Moth biplane, ZK-ABE, touched the grass of Hood Aerodrome gently. A slightly self-conscious little group of flying fans waited to whisk her to a civic reception in the Midland Hotel and in a few hours she was gone, perhaps the most famous woman in her time - royalty apart - to visit Masterton."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Beinhorn-2.jpg)

She married Bernd Rosemeyer in 1935, sadly he was killed in January 1938 in the Auto Union Streamliner.  Elly though, remained loyal to Auto Union for the rest of her life;

Here is Elly Beinhorn taking delivery of her brand new 1958 Auto Union 1000;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/H10.jpg)

She lived to the wonderful age of 100 years old - and in 2008, after her death (2007) the Audi Museum at Ingolstadt placed a special exhibition  that included a model of the Messerschmitt ME 108 "Taifun" in which Elly Beinhorn pulled off the remarkable feat of becoming the first woman to fly round the world single-handed (this, though, is a claim of some controversy, as she had the aircraft shipped between some parts of the world - the full flight was finally conquered by an American housewife, Jerrie Mock in 1964).

Bernd Rosemeyer, Elly Beinhorn and Ferdinand Porsche

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-2007-1205-500_Bernd_Rosemeyer_Elly_Beinhorn_Ferdinand_Porsche.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Elly-Beinhorn-kam-taufte-und-flog.jpg)


Elly appears right in the beginning of this fantastic 1960 Auto Union film with her 1958 Auto Union 1000 Coupe de Luxe;

https://www.audi-mediacenter.com/de/audimediatv/video/audi-werbefilm-traeume-die-sie-kaufen-koennen-1960-264


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: vonripsnorter on May 06, 2016, 03:03:37 pm
(https://www.umass.edu/sbs/sites/default/files/Like_1.jpg)

Keep this awesome info up. One of the Bests threads on here at the moment

& secondary, that has to be one of the first photos I have ever seen of Ferdinand Porsche , with an ear to ear, genuine smile
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on May 06, 2016, 05:58:48 pm
+1
Yery interesting and informative
As I mentioned earlier, there is enough here for a book
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 09, 2016, 10:43:05 am
Thanks guys!  As I say every time, it is your enthusiasm that spurs me on!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DKW IN FINLAND


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Donau.jpg)
 
Rally leader (and eventual winner) Osmo Kalpala, his co-driver Eino Kalpala and Stig Sjöblom servicing their DKW Donau during the 6th Jyväskylän Suurajot (Rally Finland) in 1956.
---------------------------------------

The Rally Finland was first held under the name Jyväskylän Suurajot (Jyväskylä Grand Prix) in 1951. Originally an endurance event that stretched to Lapland in Northern Finland, the rally was at the forefront of the adoption of the modern rally format, splitting the route into a number of special stages in the mid-1950s. With increasing international attention, it became part of the European Rally Championship programme in 1959. After the start of the World Rally Championship in 1973, the event became the Finnish round in the series. Rally Finland is now among the most popular and prestigious rallies in the championship.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Donau1.jpg)

For the 1956 event, Osmo Kalpala raced to an overall victory in a brand new Donau F93.  Donau F93?  Never heard of it?   Don’t worry, neither had I!
 The story goes like this; Finnish DKW importer Sisu cars (The Finnish heavy vehicle producer Suomen Autoteollisuus)  had some trouble selling DKW cars with the DKW name, as this had been registered before the War to another person who had the sole rights to distribute DKW cars and motorcycles in Finland.  Sisu – not to be outdone, then sold the cars badged as “Donau”.  This situation continued until the early 1960’s, when, at last, the impasse was resolved  and a new importer was appointed “VEHO”and the cars could be sold as “DKW” again in Finland. 

A rather poor, cut-off photograph of a 1958 Donau 1000 – still, of course, in the F93 series. The large Donau badge is noticeable.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Donau2.jpg)
--------------------
A further aside to this story is that Sisu assembled a series of ten Schnellasters in Karis, Finland at the end of November 1956. The vehicle was branded Donau-Sisu. The bodies were welded in Finland by use of fixtures delivered from West Germany. Welding of the complete body took just two hours per unit. Plans were in place for a larger scale production but it was not started because the technically archaic vehicle did not meet the needs of the potential Finnish customers (considered as such at that time).  One repairable Donau-Sisu has survived and saved by vintage vehicle enthusiasts . 

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Donau4.jpg)
 

The conclusion and resolution of the DKW name impasse can be seen in this 1965 DKW F102 brochure issued by “VEHO” for the-then new DKW F102;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Donau5.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 10, 2016, 11:24:25 am
A very popular option on DKW's was the "Saxomat" automatic clutch.  Not that many were sold in NZ - and to my knowledge only two exist today in NZ, a 1960 1000S Coupe which is in the Southward Museum, and my 1958 3=6 F94 four door (which I am busy rebuilding).  There is little information available on it today - so I thought I would make a little write up for those interested;

                                                         -------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat12_1.jpg)

The Story of the Saxomat “Automatic” Clutch

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat10.jpg)
 
The Saxomat or “Sax-O-mat” was referred to in a 1956 DKW brochure as making driving “Child’s Play”!  That may or may not have been have an over-enthusiastic appreciation of the system….. you decide……let’s have a look at some of its history and how it works;
  In the early 1950’s Fichtel and Sachs AG designed the Saxomat as a type of automatic clutch . It was available as an option on many cars of the 1950’s such as the Fiat 1800, Lancia Flaminia, SAAB 93 and 96, Borgward Isabella, Goliath/Hansa 1100,DKW 3=6,  Auto Union 1000, Ford Taunus, Sachsenring (Trabant), other than some models from BMW, Opel, Steyr-Puch, NSU, Glas, Wartburg and Volkswagen. Opel sold it as the “Olymat”; Sachsenring and Wartburg named the system “Hycomat”. The “Hydrak”, used in some Mercedes-Benz vehicles between 1957 and 1961, was a similar system with a hydrodynamic torque converter in place of the Saxomat's centrifugal clutch, this H.T.C. system was standard on NSU Ro 80 and was optional on the Porsche 911 (Sportomatic). The system also reappeared in the 1990s as “Sensonic”.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Hycomat_1.jpg)
 
The Hydrak “automatic clutch option”, offered by Mercedes on the 220 from the late '50s until they introduced a “proper” automatic transmission in the early '60s, used a switch on the shift lever connected to a solenoid valve to operate a vacuum servo connected to the clutch on a manual gearbox. Compared to the Saxomat automatic clutch offered on smaller European cars at that time, the Hydrak had the added refinement of a fluid drive.
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Hydrak.jpg)

The Saxomat was an evolution of the F & S-roller centrifugal clutch as a lower-cost alternative to models with automatic transmission. Pricing of  the Saxomat was therefore between automatic transmissions of the day, and a conventional “manual” change.
On Auto Union/DKW cars the Saxomat was only originally available on Coupe and four door versions of the 3=6 series (the F93 3=6 Coupe and the F94).  By 1960, this was extended to the two door “standard saloon” version of the Auto Union 1000 (it was available on the 1000S Coupe and Four door also).
Also, in post-war Germany, there was a market for vehicles that could be adapted for use by persons that had lost one or both legs during the war. As automatic transmissions were a rarity there, at that time, the automatic clutch option fulfilled that requirement nicely.

Cars with a Saxomat clutch do not have a clutch pedal. The Saxomat consists of two independent systems, the centrifugal clutch, and the servo clutch. The centrifugal clutch is engaged above certain engine rpms by centrifugal force (RPM as adjusted), acting on spinning weights inside the clutch, similar to a centrifugal governor.
 
 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat3.jpg)

As stated above, essentially, the Saxomat works with two parallel clutches and a freewheel:
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat4.jpg)

The Saxomat clutch is a combination of two single dry plate clutches:  one is operated by centrifugal force and utilises a bronze friction material and another is a normal type with asbestos material and is operated by a release bearing, a clutch lever and a vacuum actuator. The illustration to the left shows a high-rpm situation where the centrifugal clutch is engaged. The illustration to the right shows a low-rpm situation where the centrifugal clutch is released.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat5.jpg)

The purpose of the clutch control system is to release the clutch whenever the gear lever  (1) is operated and  re-engage the clutch,  when a new gear has been selected, and the accelerator pedal is depressed. Vacuum is supplied from the intake manifold and stored in  a  reservoir.  When the gear lever is touched electric current is supplied to the solenoid in the control valve (2). Vacuum is transferred to the vacuum diaphragm actuator (3) which pulls the clutch lever and releases the clutch. The diaphragm-valve-system  at the right end of the control valve (2)  ensures a controlled vacuum release and thereby a “soft” re-engagement of the clutch.  The thin hose connection to the carburettor signals a hard depressed accelerator which hastens the clutch take-up.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat6.jpg)

The servo clutch used an electric switch that supplied manifold vacuum via an actuator valve to a reservoir that disengaged the clutch. The clutch is disengaged automatically whenever the gear shift lever was touched.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat7.jpg)

 Here, above, the gear lever switch is visible in this shot of a DKW “Fissore” Saxomat, just above the rubber boot on the gear lever.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat8_1.jpg)
 
Here, above, is the Saxomat pedal and gear lever arrangement in a Volkswagen Beetle

Unfortunately, despite being a reasonably popular option on DKW/Auto Union cars it never gained widespread acceptance in the industry and was variously criticised for slow gearchange and complexity and cost of repair. The reputation of Saxomat was already savaged as early as 1956 when several motor magazines, testing Saxomat equipped DKW’s, found them slow on gearchanges and the Saxomat was felt to be a damper to the best performance of the car.  By the 1970’s, many owners of Saxomat equipped cars had begun converting them to manual clutches – mostly in frustration due to lack of knowledge on how the system worked and in certain cases, lack of spare parts.  Especially Volkswagen owners complained of unreliable operation.  However – properly maintained – many DKW owners had nothing but praise for the ease of use and reliability of the system.

Saxomat today
Although an estimated 500 Auto Union/DKW cars, worldwide, are still using Saxomat clutches, these are now rare amongst other marques – perhaps only 20 Volkswagens worldwide still retain their original Saxomat fitment.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat11.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat14.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Saxomat13.jpg)

VOLKSWAGEN SPARED NO EFFORT TO SELL THE SAXOMAT..... THIS YOUNG LADY DECLARES ABOUT THE SAXOMAT - "I AM IN LOVE"
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/saxomat-postcard-fichtel-sachs-ag-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 10, 2016, 11:31:06 am
Another one for the Kiwi car spotters - shared by friends on Facebook today - Here is a photograph of the NZ Herald building in Queen Street, Auckland circa 1975 - and in the foreground.....a DKW 3=6 Universal (Station wagon).  These were not sold new in NZ, so this one would have been a private import;

CLICK ON THE PHOTOGRAPH FOR A SLIGHTLY LARGER VERSION

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13178515_10154127296411445_7600477981046704194_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on May 12, 2016, 11:45:52 am
The DKW powered Boitel.....

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/boitel_logo.jpg)

"The company Automobiles Boitel began business as an automaker at their plant on the eastern side of Paris in 1946. By 1950 the last car had been produced.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/boitel_3cv_01b.jpg)

Boitel was an engineer who developed a two seater small car during the early 1940s, but the single-cylinder engined prototype proved too small to transport two people and the project was abandoned. The Boitel resurfaced soon after the French Liberation, however, when the manufacturer exhibited a small two seater steel bodied cabriolet car at the 1946 Paris Motor Show. The Boitel was now powered by a two-cylinder two-stroke engine of 400 cc for which a maximum 12 hp of power was claimed. In 1947 Boitel returned to the Paris Motor Show with another small two seater steel bodied cabriolet car, very similar to the previous year's exhibit but slightly more elegant. Now it was powered by a rear mounted 589 cc 18 hp DKW engine. The final car, produced for 1949, followed the same format but was powered by a 688 cc engine providing 20 hp. It seems that all three cars sat on a 2000 mm wheelbase and were 3150 mm long overall.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/boitel_3cv_01a.jpg)

It is not clear whether the Boitel ever went into production. At the 1947 motor show there was an understanding that the cars would enter production in 1948 and some orders were taken in anticipation of this. Boitel took some deposits with the orders which subsequently could not be refunded because the business failed."


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/boitel.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Boitel2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/boitel_3cv_populaire2_cat_48.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on May 18, 2016, 09:34:31 pm
Just in case no one has posted this

http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/wrecked-cars/auction-1073674067.htm
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 09, 2016, 01:23:20 pm
I've been so busy at work - I've been unable to write any regular updates for a while!

Here is a short one, showing the 1956 DKW Monza that Audi entered into the 2016 Mille Miglia;

See the link here: https://www.audi-mediacenter.com/en/photos/detail/coupes-seemed-to-have-been-created-solely-for-long-distance-races-like-the-dkw-monza-from-1956-at-the-mille-miglia-in-italy-31047

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000miglia-header-logo.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000miglia-header-dates-en.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/A162700_large_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 10, 2016, 11:41:47 am
Although this is a Kiwi group - my friends from South Africa shared photographs with me of their "Klein Kariba" run last weekend.  I thought that some of you may find this interesting;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%205.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%206.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%2010.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%208.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%207.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%209.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%2014.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%2013.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%2012.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%2011.png)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on June 10, 2016, 11:49:57 am
Nice collection
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 10, 2016, 01:27:49 pm
Although, until now, I have kept my discussions about Auto Union and DKW firmly post-war and pre-Audi, I thought I might stray into pre-war territory here.

"Rosemeyer’s Baby" - although, to some degree, a still born project it is interesting in that we are dealing, in this story below, with several strands of history that not only led to the successful Auto Union V16 racers, but also brought Dr Porsche and Auto Union close together, as well as introduced Adolf Hitler.  The legacy of that union was longer lasting - a few short years later, the legend that became the "Volkswagen" came about. Although not mentioned here to any large degree, Baron Klaus von Oertzen was pivotal in the histories of both Auto Union and Volkswagen - and even a Kiwi sense, brought both cars to New Zealand (although NZ did not get the Deek pre-war, Australia did).

Here, then, is the story reproduced verbatim from Classic and Sportscar, June 1994;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1c.jpg)

                    ------------------------------------Rosemeyer's Baby-----------------------------------------
"This is how Professor Ferdinand Porsche's
roadgoing V16 Auto Union supercar would
probably have looked. This artwork was
especially commissioned by Classic and
Sportscar and is by technical artist Brian
Nation, who had just a handful of factory
drawings on which to base his highly
detailed cutaway. Although the car was
never made, the influence of Komenda's
wind cheating shape was to be seen
decades later in the Porsche 911."

"Think Gordon Murray's mid engined, three seater McLaren F1 is novel? Ferdinand Porsche proposed just such a supercar*based on his Grand Prix Auto Union*60 years ago! Chris Nixon investigates

Imagine! It is July 27, 1936 and you are standing on the vast concrete apron that forms the starting area at the Nurburgring. Yesterday you were among the 300,000 people who cheered Bernd Rosemeyer to the echo as he won the German Grand Prix for Auto Union. Today, you will be the envy of them all, for he is going to take you on a high speed drive around the 'Ring in Professor Ferdinand Porsche's latest creation.

This extraordinary machine stands silent on the concrete before you, its silver paintwork shimmering in the strong sunlight. Based upon the mid engined Grand Prix car, it is the Professor's idea of what a sports car should be, so low and streamlined, so futuristic that it could have had a starring role in the new film of HG Wells' "Things to Come".

As you gaze upon it in awestruck silence, a beautiful Horch coupe appears and out steps Rosemeyer and his bride of two weeks, Elly Beinhom, the famous aviatrix. They greet you warmly, then Bernd ushers Elly into the Auto Union and, for the first time, you notice it retains the central driving position, with a passenger carried either side, but set back a few inches. He climbs in behind the large, four spoke steering wheel and then beckons you into the seat on his right.

You clamber in as Rosemeyer turns the key and presses the starter button. Immediately, the cabin is filled with the thunder of that fabulous, supercharged V16 which, even with silencers fitted, makes speech impossible. Elly puts her fingers in her ears and Bernd engages first gear. He turns to look at you with that impish grin of his, and raises his eyebrows as if to say, "Ready?" Before you can nod your assent the Continental rear tyres are shrieking against the concrete and you are pushed back in your scat by the raw power of that massive V16 behind you. Bernd snicks through the gears, you rocket past the pits towards the South Turn and you're off*on a 14 mile lap of the Nurburgring in the most advanced sports car in the world, driven by the man who will soon be crowned European Champion. This is the Auto Union Type 52 and it is Rosemeyer's Baby, Dream On!

Now, back to the future. In CLASSIC AND SPORTSCAR'S Ferrari Supplement (April 1993) Mike McCarthy reminded us that there is nothing new under the sun by pointing out that Gordon Murray's sensational, mid engined McLaren F1*with its three seats and central steering*was preceded by the Ferrari 365P Guida Centrale of 1966. This was an experimental car powered by a 44 litre V12 set amidships and clothed in a Pininfarina body with three seats abreast in line; in the McLaren, the passenger seats are set back a few inches.

However, even the Guida Centrale was old hat when it appeared, as the prolific Professor Ferdinand Porsche had drawn up a design almost identical to Gordon Murray's configuration*60 years before the McLaren was announced.

The 'dream machine was more than just a gleam in the eye of Professor Porsche, for it was based upon a Grand Prix car he had designed for a new company called Auto Union, formed in 1932 by the amalgamation of Audi, DKW, Horch, and Wanderer. Soon afterwards, Porsche was advised that he might be asked to design a racing car for the new Grand Prix formula that was due in 1934. Without waiting for a contract, Porsche and his business partner, Adolf Rosenberger, formed a new company called Hochleistungs Motor GmbH (High Efficiency Engines Ltd), in Stuttgart and began setting out his ideas for a supercharged, mid engined Grand Prix car, designated typ 22.

In placing the engine behind the driver, Porsche was undoubtedly influenced by his friend Rosenberger, who had raced the revolutionary Benz 'Tropfenwagen' in 1923. This had been a mid engined car and, although Benz had not pursued the design, Rosenberger had been greatly impressed by it.

To power this new racing car Porsche drew up a vast, supercharged V16 engine of 4.4litres capacity which produced 295bhp. This compares favourably with the 320bhp produced by the V12 unit (also of 4.4 litres) which Ferrari used in 1966, but it is small potatoes against the Mclaren's latest claimed output of more than 600bhp.

In May 1933, Professor Porsche and the chairman of Auto Union, Klaus von Oertzen, went to see Germany's new chancellor, Adolf Hitler. Just two weeks earlier, Hitler had agreed that Mercedes Benz should be given 500,000 Reichmarks towards its racing programme for 1934. Now Porsche showed him drawings of the new V16 engine and managed to persuade him that two teams racing for Germany would do better than one.

Hitler then agreed to divide the 500,000 RM between the two companies. Porsche returned happily to Stuttgart and the design of the typ 22 began in earnest.

With just 12 months in which to complete the design and build a team of cars for the 1934 season, you would have thought Porsche's technicians would have had enough on their plates. But the good Professor and his chief engineer Karl Rabe were already toying with the idea of using their as yet unbuilt grand prix car as the basis for a road car, in both sports and limousine versions!

All that remains of the plans for this 'lost supercar'* is a handful of drawings in the Porsche Archive. Dated November 14,1933, the very first shows a low, sleek and streamlined shape that can fairly be described as the granddaddy of the Porsche 911.

It is not difficult to trace the ancestry, for the drawings are numbered K3317 and K3318, which almost certainly means they were made by Dr Erwin Komenda. He was responsible for the bodywork that was to appear on the Auto union GP cars and, after the war, he styled the very first Porsche sports car, the 356. Also involved with the latter was Professor Porsche's son, Ferry who later styled the Porsche 911 and acknowledged Komenda's influence.

Looking at Komenda's sleek, flowing lines, one can only bemoan the fact that they were never transformed into metal, as the result would have stunned the motoring world. The limousine was unlike any that had gone before. In the mid '30s, such cars were built on the perpendicular, so that gentlemen in top hats and ladies in extravagant bonnets might be accommodated without removing them.

Komenda, however, had no such concerns and styled his karroserie to slice through the air with minimum resistance and maximum speed, It is also clear that he planned to transform the Grand Prix car into a passenger vehicle with the minimum of modification and so, in a daring move, he retained the former's central driving position and placed a scat either side, but slightly to the rear of the driver's.

In the limousine, however, all three are in line abreast, to allow proper legroom for the two passengers in the back. There is provision for a spare wheel to be carried in the car's sloping rear end.

By early 1934, the road car project had been given its own identity and was designated typ 52. Komenda's chassis drawings show he had added a longitudinal framework to which the body and large twin exhausts could be fixed. Hubs have also been drawn either side of the V16 to carry spare wheels, presumably in order to afford some luggage space in the rear of the body. The tyres on the road car were to be 5.50x20 all round, rather than the differently sized rubber of the racer.

Although the engine capacity of the Typ 52 was to remain at 4.4 litres (supercharged) the power was to he reduced from the racer's 295bhp at 450Orpm to a more manageable 200bhp at 3650 rpm. This, the Porsche design team believed, would give the sports car a maximum speed of 125mph in fifth gear and a 0 60mph time of around 8.5 secs, a quite sensational performance for 1934

The limousine would not have been much slower; to put things in perspective it's worth looking at the performance of what would have been the Typ 52 five seater's main rival in the mid '30s*the Mercedes Benz 540K. This behemoth weighed in at a colossal 57121bs, whereas the planned weight of the sports Auto Union was only 38581bs. Even the limousine would still have been a lightweight compared with the Mercedes. To propel its massive 54OK's 5.4 1itre, straight eight engine managed a paltry 115bhp and an unremarkable 180bhp when the supercharger was engaged.

In 1938 The Autocar tested a 540K, and managed a maximum speed of 104 with an 0-60mph time of 16.4 secs. The Auto Union would have blown the Mercedes away. ( not only, due to its vastly superior power to weight ratio, but also because, aerodynamically, the former would have been as sleek as a speedboat, whereas the Mercedes, was like a galleon set to royals.

Sadly, the Typ 52 project fizzled, and today no one quite knows why. Once Auto Union's racing programme was under way Porsche's design team had to concentrate their efforts upon that, but there's no doubt* the typ 52 could have been built by any one of the four Auto Union member companies, had the will been there.

On the race tracks it soon became clear that Professor Porsche's mid engine required a special talent to get the best out of it, and it was not until 1935 that an old maestro named Achille Varzi and a young wunderkind named Bernd Rosemeyer managed to do that. It is quite possible, therefore, that Professor Porsche decided his road car would be too much for ordinary mortals to handle, even in detuned condition.

Whatever the reason, the Typ 52 project was allowed quietly to die and the motoring world has had to wait for years for its like* *the McLaren F1, designed by Gordon Murray* to appear. However, had the roadgoing Auto Union been built, we can be sure that our friend Bernd Rosemeyer would have demanded the first off the line. He was like a son to Professor Porsche, who would surely have denied him virtually nothing, recognising the value of having his star driver and his wife seen driving around Europe in his sensational new creation.

We can be equally sure that Bernd wouldn't have been content with the 200bhp engine that the Professor had in mind for the Typ 52 By 1936 the size of the Auto Union V16 had been increased to 6 litres and the power had gone up to an impressive 520bhp. No doubt Bernd would have insisted upon having at least 450bhp under his right foot, and that would have been Rosemeyer's Baby!"

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1933-34_autounion_porsche_typ-52.gif)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/KlassicCarVersion2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/e41cd268dbe85fd052f45231996e6efd.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on June 10, 2016, 01:39:42 pm
Very interesting but I thought that 'Butzi' Porsche  was responsible for the 911 styling, not Ferry
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 10, 2016, 02:08:41 pm
Chocolate fish for you, Brian - Butzi would be the right answer. Well spotted!  I think C&SC dropped the ball ever so slightly there!

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 13, 2016, 08:52:50 am
Righty - here's another Kiwi Deek for you - taken at Picton in the early 1960's.  The jury's still out on tracing the whereabouts of the car today......I think it could even actually be my current project car! I've bought the original off Trademe now - so when I get it, I'll scrutinise it carefully and we'll see if it gives us any clues!

Looking at the photo, the car has just made, or is about to make the ferry crossing - loaded, it seems, with all the accoutrements needed for a family holiday.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/unnamed%2015.png)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 13, 2016, 10:53:08 am
The most spectacular 1000SP crash ever?


These photos are taken in Sweden at the Skarpnäcksfältet, the former airfield in the district Skarpnäcks farm in the Southern Suburbs of Stockholm . For many years, at Skarpnäcksfältet a motor race was held called the Skarpnack race. The airfield was closed in the 1980's and became a housing development.

 This incident involved an Auto Union 1000SP at the Skarpnäck race on 11 September 1960. The Auto Union driver, Jan Englund competed for the racing team SMK Västerås at the time.  He was luckily uninjured in the rather spectacular crash - albeit somewhat shaken!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/110402%20Kopia%20av%2011%20Namnloumlst-1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/110402%20Kopia%20av%2011%20Namnloumlst-2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/110402%20Kopia%20av%2011%20Namnloumlst-3.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/110402%20Kopia%20av%20110628%20050.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/110402%20Kopia%20av%20110628%20059.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 14, 2016, 07:50:29 am
Kiwi 1000SP's

Very few of Auto Union's premier late '50's early '60's sports car ever made it to New Zealand.  Here is a quick round up of the ones we know of;

First up is the only New Zealand new 1000SP, imported new into NZ by Speedway legend, Barry Briggs, and in itself a fairly well-known car, seen here in Christchurch in 1961;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11717292_1100159629995932_987952635777957792_o.jpg)

(photo courtesy Graham Pilgrim)

By the early 1970's, the car was apparently "tired" and painted in a metallic red/pink colour, and was rolled some years later.  It still exists in NZ, but alas, in a parlous condition.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/wc%20card%20barry%20briggs%201957%20front.jpg)

                                        --------------------------------------------------------------------------

Second is this example which came into NZ after having been driven from Germany to South Africa, then lain derelict for some time, then "restored" and sent to NZ.  It was complied in NZ after much effort apparently, and then sold to Australia, where it still happily resides.  Here it is, still with South African plates, shortly after arriving in Auckland (photos courtesy Brian Rule);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13432419_1295025243859462_9011231377771261715_n.jpg)

                           ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Third is John Farmer's 1962 1000SP roadster, which for the last 16 years has been his long term restoration project (nearly finished). It was imported from the USA as a basket case.  Here it is in February this year;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_9353.jpg)

                    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Fourth - I have been told (by a gentleman at this years Ellerslie show) that there is/was one more orange 1000SP in NZ - although I have never seen or heard of it. I was shown a photograph of it taken some 20 years back, but that's all I know....

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on June 14, 2016, 09:56:13 am
I have seen a light blue one in Auckland many moons ago

It had been butchered by someone trying to put a different engine in it

 Eddie Wright at the time said it was going to be restored



 
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 15, 2016, 01:50:20 pm
I have seen a light blue one in Auckland many moons ago

It had been butchered by someone trying to put a different engine in it

 Eddie Wright at the time said it was going to be restored

 Lee - that's super interesting! I wonder if we'll ever find the mystery SP.  They are really very special cars and extremely collectable by anyone's yardstick.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 15, 2016, 02:11:51 pm
And now... a quest for information.....

Firstly this sad looking 1960 1000S Coupe was on Trademe some time back.  At some point it lost its roof and acquired some odd 3=6 parts, such as the boot lid and bumpers...........question is.......where is it now?

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/JJ55502.jpg)

Then- do we have anyone on this forum in Christchurch?  I do not have a photo the Auto Union 1000S in the Yaldhurst Museum in Christchurch.  If anyone has a photo of it, or could take one at their next visit, I would be much obliged!

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 15, 2016, 03:01:30 pm
Auto Union Universal still in service as a delivery/breakdown vehicle, after 55 years on the job!

In Johannesburg, South Africa, one Auto Union agent still continues in business, still servicing DKW's, some 50 years after the "official" demise of DKW - Bert Stubling, a German-born gentleman, was trained at Auto Union in Dusseldorf and used to make factory visits to dealerships (for the Auto Union factory) in the Congo (Elizabethville (Lubumbashi), and Leopoldville (Kinshasa) and Angola.  His business, Rhein Motors, was a DKW dealership originally, and he still works on them and still drives his F-93 to work and uses his Universal Stationwagon as a "breakdown" vehicle

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Autounion_1.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 16, 2016, 08:32:15 am
Very interesting Deek for sale in Australia today;

(CLICK FOR LARGER VERSION)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Aussie%20Deekfor%20sale.png)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 16, 2016, 01:43:09 pm
The 1956 and '57 Geneva Rally - and the tragedy at the 1959 Nurburgring 1000Km

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWTripleVictory.jpg)

The Geneva Rally was a Swiss Rally , run from 1923 to 1971 (famous, mainly from 1954) and organized by the  Geneva branch of the Swiss Automobile Club until 1953. From 1937 to 1953, the name of "Snow Rally" was used, for the three days of the event (now mostly on French roads) were in February. The rally became international at the end of the war, in 1949. In 1954, Pierre de Toledo took the lead, and the event (then official "Rally Geneva" ) immediately acquired  expanded fame thanks to him.

The 1956 event, was at the crest of the wave of DKW rally success, and was won by a 1955 DKW F-91 driven by Stefan Brugger.  The results were as follows;

25th Rallye Geneva 25-27 May 1956:
   1 - Brugger-Karrer (DKW)   2 - Beyer-Perrot (Porsche)   3 - Martignoni-Vanini (Rover)

Unfortunately - I have been unable to track down a photograph of Stefan Brugger driving on this event - but here are two photos of his "Special"  1955 DKW F91 performing in other events during 1958;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Brugger.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Brugger_auf_DKW_F91_480p.jpg)

For 1957, the wave of DKW success continued (although the Rally Geneva was won by an Alfa-Romeo, DKW's took second and third place;

26th rally Geneva 20-23 June 1957:   1 - di Priolo - di-Priolo (Alfa 1900)   2 - Brugger-Difenthaler (DKW)   3 - Meyrat-Meyer (DKW)

You will note the recurrence of the name of Fausto Meyrat (I previously mentioned him when we discussed the 1959 Monte Carlo Rally). 

There is indeed a connection (a sad on, at that) between Stefan Brugger, Fausto Meyrat - and also Kurt Sauter, who I discussed earlier in the "DKW-Sauter" discussion.

To recap a little and continue the story;

Kurt Sauter loved fast cars and high speeds, and he built his cars himself. As early as 1946 he operated in Basel an automotive workshop. Sauter built his first special racing car of his own design in 1948, in his own body shop at 77 Klingentalstrasse in Basel. In 1957 he constructed the first DKW Sauter,  often called Brugger DKW. Stefan Brugger obtained a Mantzel tuned engine from Auto Union and was also responsible for the chassis. Kurt Sauter built the body, took over the assembly and also provided one more second copy to the wheels.

Sadly, in Stefan Brugger and Kurt Sauter's race car, Fausto Meyrat crashed fatally at the Nürburgring 1000km on 7 June 1959 . This event was further marred by the crash of a tourist, driving an Auto Union 1000SP - which resulted in the further deaths of three people;

The tragic tourist driver crash that killed 3 bystanders - the car is an Auto Union 1000SP
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FaustoMeyratdeath.jpg)

Then, still sadder, Mrs Meyrat made allegations that her husband's accident had been the fault of Stirling Moss -and took them to the Public Prosecutor in Coblenz.  These allegations were later dismissed. The newspapers reported : "Jun. 06, 1959 - Stirling Moss ''Staggered'' by crash widow's charge: When he arrived at London Airport from Canada yesterday, racing driver Stirling Moss said was ''staggered'' when he heard of the charge of ''negligent killing'' made against him by the widow of Swiss driver Fausto Meyrat. Meyrat died in hospital from injuries received on Sunday when he crashed on the German Nurburgring in the 1,000 kilometers sports car race won by Moss in the Aston Martin. the German police are investigating an allegation that Meyrat went off the track after never know whether Meyrat touched me or not''. ''There is certainly no mark on my action."

Fausto Meyrat driving the Sauter-DKW on the day he died
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FaustoMeyratdeath1.png)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/logo_full1.png)

 The Sauter-DKW was repaired and sold to a Mr Walter Sulke in Hong Kong. At the 1959 Macau Grand Prix (held on 15 November 1959) this Sauter-DKW took a sensational second place, driven by famous Australian Bill Wyllie. This was from an 1100 cm 3 engine in a race without capacity limitation!

The Macau Grand Prix

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/macau-grand-prix2.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 17, 2016, 09:36:12 am
DKW and the cops....

Being a rather fast car in the 1950's - the DKW's and Auto Unions of the period were well loved by German Police, and used countrywide for a variety of tasks.  The later Auto Union 1000S Coupe's were used as highway patrol and "pursuit" cars, until replaced by Porcshe 356's in the early 1960's.

There is a least one replica of a North Rhine-Westphalia "pursuit" car out there, as well as at least one replica of a Munster Highway Patrol car (which was also part of Audi's 2015 exhibition of Historic German Police cars).

Here are a collection of photos;

Three generations of German Police cars bearing the four rings
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1525726_437233109737831_1724255416_n_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1560760_857240117647871_1436017364603686537_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/0pompiers1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1463407_1011453232226558_8298194883181566903_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Polizei_1-1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10408815_10204109095110003_3603309471735153510_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/C41A6074_image_630_420f_wn_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AU1000Polizei_1.jpg)

A specially bodied F91 for Police use only
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F%2091%20OTP.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/36%20OTP.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Sammler-Thorsten-Saatkamp-und-Kreispolizei-Steinfurt-erneuern-Zusammenarbeit-Polizei-ist-museumsreif1_image_630_420f_wn_2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/e60592ld_6357.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/e60587de_7198.jpg)

The latest "Wiking" model of a Wiesbaden Police DKW Universal
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wiesbaden%20DKW.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/LAZ_Westfalen_Hilkenbach_Helmut_002.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3104a.7904.jpg)

The Detective arrives at the scene of the crime in an Auto Union 1000
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/bild_mid.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 20, 2016, 12:02:10 pm
“A giddy lot, these rallyists"   - The 1960 Monte Carlo Rally

Thanks to British Pathe, we can have a little peek into the 1960 Monte Carlo Rally - in which Auto Union was a winning car in its class.  The film can be found here ;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ov5brH94H4

being a film of British production, of course, BMC and other British cars dominate the storyline.  There are a couple of Deek scenes though.

Notably,  Raymond Quilico and Raphael Michot brought a 1958 model Auto Union 1000 Coupe in for for a class win and a respectable 8th overall.  Behind them were Wolfgang Levy and Heinz Walter in a DKW Junior at 13th overall.

Raymond Quilico and Raphael Michot race to their class win on 23 January 1960 in the 1958 AU1000 Coupe
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13439230_647928702026733_6129878610283622876_n.jpg)

Here are some more photographs, including some stills from the film;

Wolfgang Levy puts on some opposite lock in the DKW Junior
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo602.png)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo604.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo601.png)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo60.png)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo603.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo605.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 21, 2016, 08:37:14 am
Re-inventing the 6 volt triple contact breaker....

Talking technical things on the two-stroke triple - ignition is oft one of the most maladjusted things on these cars.  Although the adjustment procedure is unlike any other most people know - its actually quite simple. I have used the original contact breaker ignition for hundreds of thousands of miles with little trouble (if there was trouble, it was my fault). I still do stick to the contact breaker ignition.

  However, times move on and nowadays, electronic ignition kits can be had for three cylinder Deeks.  When I first saw them about 5 or 6 years ago, they were only available 12 volt - and no-one had managed to create a reliable 6 volt version.  The big issue being starting - starter draw under certain conditions (cold conditions, low battery etc..) could pull the available voltage for the ignition way down to 3 volts or so - under which circumstance it was near impossible to get the engine started.  I'm not sure how well that issue has been resolved - but 6 volt kits are now on the market - albeit pretty dear.

One of these can be had from  Arne Guldenstein in Germany - here is the link;

http://www.mobilitaeten.de/6V_elektro_max.htm

Arne's one looks like this;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMAG0004.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMAG0005.jpg)

then there is this version, which apparently can also fit in Wartburg and Barkas motors;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWElectronic%20ignition.png)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWElectronic%20ignition2.png)

Here is the link to the "other" version;

http://www.ebay.de/itm/Auto-Union-DKW-F93-F94-F12-Elektronische-Kennlinien-Zundung-6V-3-Zylinder-/182154299839?hash=item2a693e09bf:g:ZCMAAOSw7NNT7McL

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 21, 2016, 02:53:38 pm
Super-rare 1963 Auto Union 1000SP Roadster on Ebay today;

One of 1640 made;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_57%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_57%202.jpg)

http://www.ebay.de/itm/Auto-Union-Oldtimer-1000-SP-Roadster-Cabriolet-unrestauriert/291795060925?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20140117125630%26meid%3D31d141bbfb2640aea37d5e63b43452dd%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D10%26mehot%3Dpp%26sd%3D112029212287 (http://www.ebay.de/itm/Auto-Union-Oldtimer-1000-SP-Roadster-Cabriolet-unrestauriert/291795060925?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20140117125630%26meid%3D31d141bbfb2640aea37d5e63b43452dd%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D10%26mehot%3Dpp%26sd%3D112029212287)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 22, 2016, 01:21:53 pm
Racing at Kyalami, South Africa in the early 1960's;

Champions of the day were Coenraad Spamer and Sarel v/d Merwe;

Note the Mini "whoopsie"

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami5.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami3.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami4.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami7.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami8.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWKyalami2.gif)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 22, 2016, 05:11:38 pm
Not quite a beauty - Günther Braun's dream

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/-57-807141679902887041-3338780036929248207.jpg)

Some months ago,  the strangest DKW anyone had ever laid eyes on, appeared on Ebay. It looked familiar in some ways and very unfamiliar in others, but for sure it was, as a German magazine recently called it, " THE CAR OF AN INCORRIGIBLE INDIVIDUALIST"

The car, advertised on Ebay in October 2015, was advertised as a DKW 3=6..... One could safely say that it was not quite recognisable as a DKW 3=6!  The tail resembled that of an Auto Union 1000 SP - although the rest of the car did not fit this dashing coupé (the 1000SP). The front end seemed somewhat strange, the roof too high. Not even the seller himself knew much about the vehicle.

When the German magazine MOTOR-TALK became aware of the auction, they asked an expert from the Auto Union Veterans Club (AUVC), what it was. Voilà! He knew this strange 3 = 6 for more than 30 years!

Some time later - the daughter, Annette, of the constructor, Günther Braun, became aware that the car had resurfaced, and was put into contact with MOTOR-TALK magazine.  To quote MOTOR TALK's article " The eyes of Annette Brown were wet when she spotted the car on the Internet, so it was that a few days later she told us on the phone that she had never expected once again to see her father's DKW 3 = 6   - the car with which she connects hundreds of memories. "My son discovered it on the MOTOR-TALK Facebook page" . Coincidence or fate: but this car only a few people can recognize at all."

As MOTOR-TALK reports, her father, Gunther Braun, was an engineer at the German Federal Post Office. He had already built a house, planted a tree and fathered a child - apparently it was not enough for his creative urge. In the early 1960s he began to rebuild his faithful DKW 3=6, into what was, ostensibly, his dream car.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/brick-wall-6572797402724893057.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/mc8kw4x9q3arr3rkp5im-img-4417-keith-misner-3686505742084804644.jpg)

Now, the DKW 3=6 is and was a straightforward car in many respects - and thoroughly Teutonic, practical and well-thought-out, without unneccessary frills. Gunther, it seems, saw it his mission to alter some of these traits.  His daughter called him "an individualist and an artist, through and through"

The first thing he did was to remove the 40bhp 3=6 motor and fit a 60 bhp motor from a DKW F102 in its place.  Next, he grafted in a panoramic windshield from an Opel Rekord into the place where the Deek's flat 'screen had been (with its elaborate chrome trim).  After that, things progressed quickly - large rear fins were fitted (these were later reduced in size apparently at the insistence of the persons in charge of certification of the modified vehicle at the German Traffic Department) and mirrors faired into the front fenders.

Gunther had lost his left eye in cycling accident in his early 1920's - To improve visibility, he divided the left side mirror of his car in two and was thus able to better see in the blind spot. The big steering wheel,from a later Auto Union 1000S, he unceremoniously cut in half by and corked the ends with mini golf balls . Finally, there was a clear view on the dashboard. To cap it mounted the self-cast, 20-centimeter-tall bronze figure of a lizard on the bonnet of the small DKW (this he would remove before each roadworthiness test, as the test officer did not like it, and refit upon leaving).

Annette remembers "We went at least 10 times in it across Austria, Switzerland, France, across the Pyrenees and Andorra to the Mediterranean, and of course back" .
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/k9pzheo1rsinmmp1ptsl-wood-kindfolk-4851584878194596840.jpg)

Günther Braun could not be moved by the odd setback. When his wife got her driving license, she was allowed to take the DKW out. But the first ride came to a sudden end - Mrs Braun forgot the suicide passenger door open, while moving the car out of the carport, catching it on a piece of the carport structure, severely damaging the car . Again followed weeks of welding, dent removal and painting.

Mr Braun, eventually sold his "baby" in the 1970's - and despite many tears - the Braun family never saw the car again - until 2015.

In the end, it sold for a very respectable 15000 Euros.  One would hope that such a unique car is restored!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/photo-1444159759392-aeeb3d5851c1-jarren-simmons-7883265856021665208.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Typ-F93-6_0.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Typ-F93-7_0.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Typ-F93-4_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on June 22, 2016, 05:30:33 pm
Hmmmm, after looking at that I'm wondering if the crusher might not be a better option
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 22, 2016, 05:49:01 pm
Can't say I completely disagree Brian - it is butt-ugly, really.  But, if someone paid 15000 Euro for it, surely they would restore it?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on June 22, 2016, 06:40:33 pm
Can't say I completely disagree Brian - it is butt-ugly, really.  But, if someone paid 15000 Euro for it, surely they would restore it?

Be OK if they restored it back to original
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: the phantom on June 23, 2016, 10:44:26 am
no, I disagree, it's one man's personal expression and while it's not particularly attractive, it should be kept as intended

on another note, there's an article in the current Octane magazine on AUDI Tradition's restoration of a DKW Electro-Laster, the only english language reference I could find in Google is this: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2015/02/11/audi-restores-battery-powered-1956-dkw-schnellaster-kastenwagen/ (http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2015/02/11/audi-restores-battery-powered-1956-dkw-schnellaster-kastenwagen/)

(http://assets.blog.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads//2015/02/HI150003_large.jpg) cute little bug!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 23, 2016, 02:13:42 pm
Thanks to the Phantom!  Great link - thanks mate! 

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Monza_Rekordwagen_01-840x410.jpg)


The DKW Monza - restoration of a legend, and a dream come true

This year, we celebrate 60 years since the record breaking runs of the DKW Monza at Monza in December 1956 (the car was first called the DKW "Solitude", but renamed the "Monza" after the records were set. In December 1956 a team consisting of two Germans and two Swiss crew spent alternating times driving a DKW Monza around the racecourse at Monza, Italy. With an average speed of 140 km/h (87 mph), the team of drivers set five international records.

One of these original cars still exists today, and has been restored to its exact original configuration. "Luxury Cars-TV" picks up the story;

"Can you imagine that a dream one had since childhood, at once comes true? A car that seemed once unattainable finally really stands in your own garage? For Philipp Blonck from Munich, it has become true. Persistence and a modicum of luck had helped, that today he may call a DKW Monza his own.

“This DKW Monza is a prototype, the vehicle, which was built as the sixth and then was used for the record runs in 1956. These record rides took place at Monza. There, the vehicle had driven six long distance world records. Due to this success the name of the DKW Monza was created.”

 
After some race succesesses of the DKW 3 = 6 Sonderklassse during the European Touring race and street rallies the two racing drivers Günther Ahrens and Albrecht W. Mantzel decided, to build an extremely lightweight plastic body onto the chassis of a DKW F93. The first vehicle bodies, such as the record car, were built at Dannenhauer & Strauss. The vehicle shown here is the number six of the eight prototypes.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_Monza_Rekordwagen_04-1024x722.jpg)

“The vehicle has a special feature. You can see it at the side window. It is square. The later vehicles have a rounded side Window, the front edge has been round. This is the only vehicle that has the square side window and therefore it’s also the proof, that it is the record vehicle. In addition, but this is not visible, it has a larger tank installed, with approx. 70 litres volume, which is mounted for having a minimum of fuel stops during the record atempt. The later series vehicles have an approximately 40 litre tank.”

The record car was brought to the United States after the 1956 race victories. There he attempted some races until 1960 and then with a sudden disappeared from the scene.

“The vehicle was found in the United States in a very sad state. It was relatively destroyed by a fire. Then it got transported to Europe five years ago and was rebuilt in Austria by a restoration company. From the outset, the goal was to put  the vehicle back into the state and appearance it had during the record driving. It was built up entirely. “It has the color of that time and also the Interior was reconstructed exactly and precisely. Also the painting and the stickers were reconstructed as it was at that time, such as E.g. the ADAC sticker on the windscreen, the DKW sticker on the rear window and also the D sign that the vehicle had at that time in Monza.”

 

The initially called DKW ‘Solitude’ received its current name “Monza” later on, after they recorded several speed record victories at the Italian circuit of Monza. During a 72-hour ride on the circuit of Monza, the racers Günther Ahrens, Heinz Meier, Roberto Barbay and Georg Theiler gained five world records in the class G8 (vehicles up to 1000cc).

 

“The history says it already: these trips were long-haul races and so this car has to seen.” For us, this vehicle is a collector’s car, which we also like to drive out for various events, Otherwise we will maintain it as good as possible and will show it to the public.”

 

If we speak today of a racing car, most people imagine a fast exalerating car. But this doesn´t fit to the DKW Monza, even if he looks like it. He is build for a long-hauling races and takes some time to speed up. Once he is rolling, he reaches with his 40Hp  strong 3-cylinder two-stroke engine with a capacity of 903 ccm, a top speed of about 140 km/h.

The lightweight streamlined fiberglass Coupé body ensures low air resistance and  a low weight of 733 kg.

 

“A youth dream for me has come true. When I was 4-5 years old, I’ve looked at my fathers DKW book, because my dad himself had a DKW when he was a young man. There I tripped repeatedly over the DKW Monza. I have always followed up for this vehicle, even though you never could see one live. With 14 years I succeeded to buy an original brochure of the DKW Monza, which I still have.  But then I never surrendered the opportunity, to find such a vehicle. By coincidence, we have then discovered this vehicle on the classic car show in Padua 2011. My father and I decided then to buy and restore it to that it back to the state as it is today. “We can say: a dream has come true.”

“The restoration took about 4 years. Much of the time was used on organizing parts, because many parts are no longer available or had to be reproduced. Specifically, the body, which is made of fibre glass, of course took long time. The DKW Monza was the first German car with a fibre glass body.”

“The premiere of the car was on a DKW meeting, where we couldn´t drive it much. Today, we have made a proper virgin ride on the streets here in the district. It was a great time to experience the car. You can feel the technically great work behind it and how it is driving today –  but it´s real fun.”


There is also a super video on this car, right here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHg2oAn4_UM



(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW-Monza-1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-monza.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-monza-2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4d99aa2629fc0683378a164ed0a51c66.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 24, 2016, 09:51:10 am
From the record breaking Monza...................all the way down to the humble taxis of Germany and Brazil.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/552159bd4e579d99c4d4408127bc0549.jpg)

DKW's were used by several Taxi companies in the late 1950's and early 1960's , mostly in the Deek's native Germany and also in Brazil.

Here is a late model Vemaguet (note the double headlamps) in service as an Airport Taxi
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/taxibsb.jpg)

There is a fantastic video available on Youtube of "a day in the life" of a Hamburg taxi driver, who just happens to drive a DKW, here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l6hV0GfGMg

Here is a still from that film
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/hqdefault.jpg)

Also - the Brazilian version of the F-94, the "Belcar" was heavily featured in the taxi ranks
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/b5c9c42a6e88aaaa0610520e3406bc34.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/3214160512_21c36ed52e_z.jpg)

Here is a late model DKW-Vemag "Belcar" on the streets, doing its job
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/23ee093f413d1ec68c34646c94d406d4.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 27, 2016, 01:00:42 pm
William Werner - a big force at Auto Union

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/WilliamWernerDKW.jpg)
William Werner seen here with a clay Wanderer model

William Werner was born on 7 November 1883 in New York, USA. As the son of a German banker in New York, he returned with his family to Germany when he was 14 years old. Starting out first apparently with sculpture, Werner studied art - eventually finishing in automotive design!

He quickly rose in the machine tool industry and spent four years as department manager at Rheinmetall (the same factory building Auto Union would use after World War 2). In 1926 he, again, returned to America, where he worked as a "line man" at Chrysler and learnt much of the American automobile industry. This study of mass production stood him in good stead - his next position was at the Horch factory in Zwickau from 1929. The 1933 merger with DKW, Audi, Wanderer, saw Werner catapulted to senior management in Auto Union, in charge of guiding it out of the Great Depression.

William Werner became Technical Director of Auto Union on 31 December 1934, after the ousting of "the Father of DKW" J. Rasmussen from the company.

During the 1930's and during the War, he was, as were other members of Auto Union management and employees, a member of the Nazi (NSDAP) party.  During the war he was a fixture on the board of the Jägerstab, as the director of Auto Union - Junkers. He was judged, after the war (as Leni Reifenstahl the film maker was) as a "Mitläufer" or "fellow traveler" - as far I can make out from a German research study -  Authors of the study, economic historian Rudolf Boch of the University of Chemnitz, and Martin Kukowski, head of the Department of history at Audi, were granted access to the Audi archives for the first time for their 'house cleaning' history of the firm. The buildup and onset of World War II encouraged the development and production of special vehicles for military purposes in the 1930s. Auto Union became an important supplier of vehicles to Germany's armed forces. Following the outbreak of war, civilian production was interrupted in May 1940. After this, the company produced exclusively for military purposes.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/9239556174_b65b9cee54_b.jpg)
A Wehrmacht DKW F8

For the production of Junkers aircraft engine under license, Auto Union founded in 1935 the subsidiary "Mitteldeutsche Motorenwerke" (Central German Motor Works) at Taucha, northeast of Leipzig.

During World War II, Auto Union/Horch supplied the chassis for the Sd-Kfz 222 armored car. Powered by an 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) Horch V8 engine, it reached a top speed of 50 mph (80 km/h) on the road. The all-wheel drive Kfz 11, or Horch/Wanderer Type 901, was used as a medium transport vehicle to shuttle German military officials. Horch works also produced the AWD heavy transport vehicle Type 801 (both named Einheits-PKW der Wehrmacht).

From the beginning of 1944, Auto Union plants (Horch and Audi plant at Zwickau, Mitteldeutsche Motorenwerke and Siegmar/Wanderer plant at Siegmar-Schönau) were heavily bombed and severely damaged. The U.S. Army occupied Zwickau on 17 April 1945 near the end of WWII. After withdrawal of the U.S. Army on 30 June from Zwickau, all Saxon plants of Auto Union were occupied by the Red Army


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/WilliamWernerDKW2.jpg)
Dr Werner is visible in this photograph, walking to the right of Dr. Richard Bruhn (who is in the centre of the photo) - both in Homberg hats

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1403249074-5911-4_2.jpg)
Dr. Martin Kukowski, one of the researchers into Auto Union's wartime activities, and one of the authors of the research study and subsequent thesis, with a DKW F7 from 1935 in the Chemnitz Industrial Museum

The DKW F9, a revolutionary car - was ready for production in 1940 - this however never eventuated. Only three cars survived the war - to quote my friend Paul Markham's blog - "The third car escaped from Chemnitz intact with William Werner when he fled to the West to avoid Soviet reprisals against Auto-Union's management. He settled in Oldenburg, near Bremen in the British Occupation Zone, but in 1946 the British Ministry of Supply seized his car and sent it to the School of Tank Technology in Cobham, Surrey. After a period of testing it was handed over to the Australian Army as part of the redistribution of German technology amongst the Allies."

After the Second World War he held a managerial position at bicycle/moped manufacturer Pluvier Motorenfabriek in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

 In the mid-fifties, the Rheinmetall Group had bought into Auto Union. With the help of a new management Mr Flick, of Rheinmetall wanted to lead Auto Union to success. From the moped factory in Holland, Flick took Dr. William Werner and made him the Technical Director of Auto Union.  On 1 July 1956 (sources differ, some quote 17 May) he rejoined the Post-War Auto Union, replacing Dr Richard Bruhn, who had retired (Bruhn was known as the "Father of Auto Union").  Oskar Siebler from the same factory was, then, presented as a design and development chief.

The third new man was Dr. Werner Henze. The trained business economist had previously directed the Central Bureau of the United German Metalworks Ltd. Dr Henze had never been in the automotive business before....

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/WilliamWernerDKW3.jpg)
Seen here with Ferdinand Porsche

Dr. Werner was on a mission to bring Auto Union from struggling to compete with companies like Volkswagen, to financial success.  To do this he did a few things - firstly, he cancelled the unsuccesful "plastic car" production programme, which had been dragging on for several years without a satisfactory result (the intention of which was to provide a high quality, low cost vehicle with which to challenge the Volkswagen).  In its place he boldly put forth two new cars - the Auto Union 1000SP, and the DKW Junior.

In 1956 the T-Bird was already a huge hit in America, and Europe was taking notice. Dr. Werner had traveled to the United States the previous year and been captivated by the lines of Ford’s luxurious roadster. Upon his return Werner told Auto Union chief stylist Josef Dienst he should "go in that direction" with the styling of a proposed two-seater. Dienst took the suggestion to heart, producing a sporty shape so attractive, that Werner said the car must go into production. The 1000 SP debuted as a coupe at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1957, alongside the DKW Junior.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5873950835_62d31344e8_1.jpg)

 Werner, Henze and Siebler brought the Junior into the spotlight, showing it, as mentioned previously, at the Frankfurt Motor Show in March 1957 - intended as a breath of fresh air into the product range...... only nobody was allowed to look under the bonnet: The car had no engine!  It was not until nearly two years later that the new car rolled off the production line, ready to drive. The reaction, however was very favourable - and even American magazines of the period were reporting the interest that the "DKW 600" as it was then called was generating. Production was a certainty.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-600-10.jpg)
The DKW 600 (later called the "Junior") at the Frankfurt Motor Show in March 1957 - just don't open the bonnet!

Dr Werner together with the Auto Union chief designer, Oskar Siebler, had the idea of the unique two stroke oiling system "Lubrimat" while drinking their coffee in the Alpine Franzenshöhe cafe - on 17 March 1959. In their words, whereas the two stroke engine was a remarkable power unit, "it's malodorous blue-smoky smell" offended people.  The Lubrimat was intended to fix this.  This invention, while noteworthy at the time, ultimately hastened the death of two stroke automotive engines, and ultimately Auto Union itself. It was touted as "Sensation at the International Automobile Exhibition 1961"

Interestingly enough - after that cup of coffee - Werner and Siebler filed a patent for the Lubrimat in April 1959 - here it is :

https://www.google.com/patents/US3114356

Dr Werner did produce Auto Union's best selling post-war car up to that point - with 230 000 units sold - the Junior could justifiably be considered a success.

Dr. William Werner retired in 1962, and died on June 20, 1970 in Sempach, Switzerland.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11406948_1718436471717200_4346086161090782381_n.jpg)
Dr Werner's legacy - the DKW Junior


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 29, 2016, 09:39:48 am
An interesting titbit about the "Model 60" panoramic windscreen 1000 series of two door cars.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/CarDatabaseNetPhotoID00094120.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/SAM_3909.jpg)

Those of you who have owned/driven/been driven in "panoramic" Auto Union 1000 or 1000S car may have noted the rather curious interior door handle arrangement.  In short, the door was opened from the inside of the car by lifting the armrest - thus removing the need for an additional handle. The armrest/door handle was screwed onto the door with two generous Parker-Kalon-type screws, which held the halfmoon shaped, chromed, escutcheon plate on which the handle hinged.  The forward end of the handle pushed over a bell crank of sorts, which actually actuated the lock mechanism. Now - I've owned these cars for many years, and never thought of it as much more than a novelty.... Truth is - Auto Union were actually very, very proud of this little invention, invented by Mr Werner Schulze - and moved to patent it, so that no-one else would think of fitting such an "amazing" device to their cars!

The actual patent may be read here: https://www.google.com/patents/US3038757?dq=inassignee:%22Auto+Union+Gmbh%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiX7f3Dk8fNAhXGsJQKHce-CbYQ6AEILDAC

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/US3038757-0.png)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 30, 2016, 08:35:24 am
Which to choose....DKW F102 or the Audi 60?
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wie-Daimler-sich-einst-einen-echten-Konkurrenten-schuf.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on June 30, 2016, 10:54:56 am
A very special Auto Union 1000S

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1ee5f261bfca828ff8f96b77bcc5745e.jpg)

This car was found in the late 1980s in a warehouse in the industrial area in Frankfurt. The warehouse was rented by nine DKW enthusiasts and filled to the ceiling with DKW parts and cars. A few of the DKW-friends had given up their hobby, leaving the others with a rent they couldn’t pay any longer. They had to rent a smaller warehouse. From lack of space, some DKW's and parts including this Coupe had to be sold. The previous owner of this car, had begun the restoration but did not make much progress.

A Dutch DKW enthusiast bought the car, despite the advice of a friend. First, many parts had to be bought or made, in order to be able to build off the bare bodywork. Secondly - it was a one-off. Despite the doubt, the car was bought for DM 2,750,-- and brought to the Netherlands. For this price the risk was minimal because the two Porsche 911 doors and the other components were in good condition. The loose parts would yield enough to cover the costs.

On arrival in the Netherlands the car was critically examined. The headlights came from a NSU and the grill was made of perforated sheet. The Coupe had a 2 stroke race engine. The bodywork showed that the car was intensely used and full of dents and scratches. Investigation failed to determine if this car has been a factory project or an "one-off". Supposedly the car started life at a technical college (thought to be in Kaiserslautern). One thing is certain, the base for the construction of the Coupe is an Auto Union 1000 S De Luxe (model 62) built in 1963.

To restore the body from its "as found" state was not easy. On the restoration photographs you couldn’t see much more than a bare body shell, where the flowing Coupe line was barely recognizable. Thew new owner used the nose and the bumper of a Audi 60, which fitted very well. For the rear lights round Hella lamps were used. The round lamps adapted better in the design than the original rectangular lamps. Recently round headlights were mounted also (I liked the original Audi units, in my first picture right at the top of this story, myself - Ed). Further second-hand components were the front window of a Fiat 850 Sport and the fuel filler cap of an NSU Sport. Because the non-original items were selected with care, the design of the 1.83-metre-wide car was not spoiled and became a beautiful balanced design.

The car was. sandblasted and repainted in the original red colour. Also the original engine was rebuilt, but the owner didn’t like it. With this engine the Coupe had a top speed of 185 km/h and was, in its new owner's opinion just too "restless" for everyday use - idle was at 3,500 rpm!  A lower spec engine was substituted, which now gives the rather heavy Coupe, a top speed of 130km/h.

(The text is from Kucarfa.nl - although I have tweaked the translated Dutch a little for easier English reading - the top photo was taken by my Dutch friend Robert Sipkens)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AU1000SP1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AU1000SP2.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AU1000SP5.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AU1000SP6.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on July 01, 2016, 10:50:05 am
Just when you think you've heard and seen everything about that very famous day (or rather infamous day) - 22 November 1963 - I am going tell you something you may not know....  John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated at 12:30 p.m. Central Standard Time (18:30 UTC) on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dealey Plaza, Dallas, Texas. The last car he ever saw, was, apparently, a 1958 DKW 3=6, which was parked, facing the other way...

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13567236_1220069941338477_888847586001743371_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on July 13, 2016, 05:27:19 am
The "Braemar incident" - the 1959 RAC Rally

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/9489090124_9666496a69_b.jpg)

(Photograph taken from the "Viking Rally" - same driver, same year)

On the RAC Rally in November 1959 Auto Union works driver Wolfgang Levy and Stuart Turner almost won the RAC Rally outright in what might have/could have been the most successful Rally outing of the 1000SP's career, placing them in line to win the European Rally Championship.  They did not succeed (as you will read in Stuart's account below) and a protest was lodged.  Their protest, however, has been described ever since as the "Braemar Incident"  and partly for this reason ,1959 has been described as a year which was the end of an era in Rallying, most notably in the 2005 book by Tony Gardiner "RAC Rally Action!"

Stuart Turner relates the following account in his 2012 book “Twice Lucky : My Life in Motorsport”

“ In 1959 Wolfgang Levy, who was a friend of Pat Moss and Erik Carlsson, invited me to do the RAC Rally with him in a works Auto Union 1000SP Coupe,  a shatteringly noisy little car that had a 981cc three-cylinder engine and front-wheel drive.
Wolfgang spoke almost no English, and I had no German.  My Russian was not going to help and anyway I’d forgotten most of it by then,  but we agreed via interpreters that I would shout “attack” if we needed to be flat out.  We “attacked” a lot that week, I remember.
I’d never even sat in a car with him before the rally started and I certainly didn’t know anything about Auto Union DKW’s, so I really don’t know how to rate Wolfgang – I don’t think he was quite as fast as Erik Carlsson, but then who was?  - but he certainly pressed on well and we never went off the road even in the snow and slush.
It was the first of Jack Kemsley’s routes with lots of mileage, lots of night navigation, and some special tests, which was by British co-drivers like me. Wolfgang was in the lead before we found the road blocked by snow drifts over the mountain near Tomintoul; we were 50 minutes late in reaching the Braemar control and were placed eighth.
As Peter Garnier wrote in his Autocar column;
 “Levy had put up fastest time of his class in pretty well all the tests, and had incurred no further penalty points on the road sections. Therefore, without the Braemar penalties, he would won the Rally hands down….”
After the event Auto Union protested about the blocked section but then returned to Germany leaving me to handle the appeal in Pall Mall before the Stewards of the RAC, an august body comprising Lord Shawcross QC, Col Willam Short and Lord Brabazon of Tara.
I produced maps and loads of evidence and to my shame had to argue against Jack Kemsley, who was and remained a good friend.  Don’t forget that the war hadn’t been over all that long and to be arguing for the Germans against British interests was not a comfortable experience.  The Stewards eventually found against us but said, “ We do this in the cognisance that there is a higher court of appeal.” In other words, “Take it up with Paris if you feel strongly about it”. Auto Union declined to do so and let the appeal drop. “



Stuart Turner did see that victory though - In 1960 he was part of the winning team with Erik Carlsson in a SAAB on the RAC Rally.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on July 20, 2016, 07:16:08 am
A female force in Rallying - Greta Molander-Barth

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/9788204142566.jpg)

Greta is probably best known as a works Saab driver from the 1950s, although she drove for Auto Union DKW many times in her career. She competed from the 1930s to the 1970s, but was most successful in the ‘50s, winning many Coupes des Dames.

She was born Greta Ohlson in Ystad, Sweden, in 1908. Her parents ran a hotel. They both died within months of each other in 1927, leaving a considerable amount of money and possessions to their daughter. Sadly, a poor investment meant that she had to sell most of this, keeping only one car.

Unusually for the time, she had learned to drive as a teenager, and entered her first rally in 1929, driving her father’s La Salle car. It was a women’s event, and she was last. Four years later, she won the Swedish Rikspokal for rallying, in a borrowed Plymouth.

In 1934, she started her first major international rally, the Monte Carlo, from Umeå in the north of Sweden. Her car was another Plymouth. She repeated this feat in 1935, and was rewarded with a finish, in 30th place. On her fourth try, she won her first Monte Carlo Coupe des Dames, finishing 24th in her Plymouth. In a particularly strong year for female drivers, she was third in the 1938 women’s standings, despite coming 19th overall. During the 1930s, she was active in Plymouths and other American cars in Norwegian rallies.
In 1938, she married Kaare Barth (Petrus), a Norwegian writer, and settled in Norway. She always competed under the name “Molander”, seemingly the name of a first husband, despite enjoying a long and happy marriage to Petrus.

She switched from American cars to a DKW for 1939, but does not seem to have finished, and rallying then halted for World War II.

Norway was occupied by the Germans for much of the war. Greta is said to have been jailed at one point, for insulting a German officer.

Rallying returned to Monte Carlo in 1949, and Greta came with it. She was 52nd, in a Dodge.

Her relationship with the Saab marque began in 1950, in the Monte again. She was one of the first works drivers they employed. The Saab 92 had just been launched, and Greta drove one to 55th place, starting at Stockholm. She was actually the first of the two Saab finishers that year.

1951 saw her compete more widely in Europe, driving the Saab in the Tulip and Midnight Sun rallies. She won the first of six Midnight Sun Coupes des Dames that year, and was again the leading Saab driver
.
In 1952, she was second of four Saab drivers in the Midnight Sun Rally, behind Rolf Mellde. Her co-driver was Helga Lundberg. Their partnership lasted for many years.

Other rallies she entered included the 1953 Lisbon Rally, where she was third in the Ladies’ standings. This, and her performances in the Northern European rallies, were enough to earn her a European Ladies’ Championship title.

The Tulip Rally became one of her regular yearly fixtures. She normally drove the Saab, but she accepted a drive in another car for 1954, a DKW, and was 33rd. Her arch-rival, Sheila van Damm, driving for the Rootes team, had got into the top ten, so the Coupe des Dames was out of reach this time. The Tulip was not her only DKW outing in 1954: she won another Midnight Sun Rally Ladies’ prize that year.

The Saab team did not enter the 1955 Monte, so Greta drove the DKW again, but does not seem to have finished. She continued to rally the DKW in the Viking Rally, and was thirteenth. In the Tulip Rally, she was back in the 92, and went one better than Sheila van Damm last year, finishing ninth overall.

There seems to have been a hiatus in her Saab involvement in 1956, when she used a Mercedes 220 for the Monte, and a Peugeot 403 for the Midnight Sun Rally, in which she was 56th.

After that, she drove the new Saab 93, which would become a successful car for the manufacturer, and was the beginning of Saab as a major rallying contender. Her team-mates that year included Ewy Rosqvist and Erik Carlsson.

By 1960, she was winding down her competition career, although she still accepted invitations to drive for Saab in major rallies. She drove the 93 on the Monte between 1960 and 1962.

When she retired from professional rallying in 1962, she was 54 years old. Although she became somewhat of an occasional competitor, she carried on making appearances in rallies until the 1970s, and also rallied historic cars. In 1973, she made one last appearance on the Monte, her nineteenth attempt at the Monaco classic. Her car was a Saab.

Away from rallying, she was an intrepid traveller, who wrote about her experiences, such as crossing Africa and America by car. The American trip, during the 1940s was partly funded by Chrysler, who used it as a promotional opportunity. Whilst in America, Greta worked as a film stunt driver.

As well as writing about her own experiences, she translated English works into Norwegian, including some of PG Wodehouse’s novels. Wodehouse and Greta were friends. She also illustrated books, including two children’s books, which she and Petrus worked on together.

She died in 2002, at the age of 94.

(Text from speedqueens.blogspot)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-7.jpg)

(Greta won the 1954 Midnight Sun Rally Ladies prize driving a DKW 3=6 Sonderklasse, I could not find a photo of Greta's DKW on the '54 Midnight Sun Rally - here is the DKW of Heinz Meier on the same event, who got a class win - photo courtesy of my friend Paul Markham's blog heinkelscooter.blogspot )
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on July 21, 2016, 02:51:48 pm
Ilse Thouret - German athlete, Motorcycle racer and Racing Driver

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/llsethouret_artnbr3.jpg)

"In the 1930’s Ilse Thouret was considered a star motorcycle racer by her country, Germany. Born into ‘high society’ in Hamburg, of French Huguenot extraction, Ilse was highly educated in typically German fashion, cultured, well read and multi-lingual. She had a reputation for being comfortable whether dancing on the ball room floor or clad in mechanics gear racing from success to success.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/23_38545428.jpg)

She became a wife and a mother raising two daughters who later made history racing motor scooters for Italy’s Vespa team just after the war. Ilse was a member of the DKW (in 1916 Danish engineer Jørgen Skafte Rasmussen founded a factory in Saxony, he produced a slightly modified version of this engine into a motorcycle and called it “Das Kleine Wunder” — “a little marvel”. This was the real beginning of the DKW brand and in 1930 DKW was the largest motorcycle producer in the world) factory Motocross team, a World-class swimmer and the 1936 Olympics team coach of Germany’s Lady’s Fencing team.

Ilse Thouret first race achievement was in 1927 on a 750cc *Mabeco where she finished first! This was just the beginning of her numerous racing successes over the next 10 years that followed. In addition, the first race she tried to enter, she was refused and forced to remove herself from the track simply because women were not allowed to race —it was too dangerous.

Ilse Thouret rode in the forties, not just motorcycle racing, she fought successfully against their male competitors though, during a time when few women on motorcycles were even riding.

Her passion is riding a motorcycle, and their performance is rewarded with recognition. 1933 – a year after her first race. She made the Austro Daimler Puch “The Thouret” as its  factory rider. In 1934, she began riding for DKW.

 During the late 1920s and 1930s, DKW was the world’s largest motorcycle manufacturer.In 1931, Ing Zoller started building split-singles and this concept made DKW the dominant racing motorcycle in the Lightweight and Junior classes between the wars. This included off road events like the International Six Days Trial where the marque scored some considerable inter-war year successes alongside Bavarian Motor Works At the same time, the company also had some success with super-charged racing motorcycles which because of their light weight were particularly successful in the ISDT

Ilse Thouret also became a well-known advertising personality for motorcycles and tires, fuel and oil. In one advertisement a display on the 1840 km ride to Eilenriede race she says: “My 600-DKW machine with side car survived this non-stop driving without the slightest damage. Yes, I before I needed to repair for eight punctures”.

This understatement clearly says: Even racing women are just like the male competitors able to repair their bikes at the competitions themselves. “The fact of being a woman, was never the reason for natural helpfulness of men. I always helped myself alone first – special treatment I always refused. “"


In 1959, at the age of 63, she embarked on a 17000 km odyssey through Africa in a DKW Munga - achieving, amongst other things, crossing the Sahara (starting at Tangiers), crossing Nigeria, the Belgian Congo, the Rhodesias - continuing on to Cape Town. Quite a feat in those days!


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_1%202.jpg)

In 1969, she passed away after a long illness.

(quoted text courtesy of motoress.com)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 13, 2016, 11:11:25 am
Some odes to the post war Auto Union DKW;

In the Republic of Palau (of all places) - a $5 coin was struck in its honour in 2013;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/PLW2013AutoUnion.jpg)

In South Africa - popular local singer Steve Hofmeyr (who has performed in NZ a few times) sang a song about the DKW, echoing that nation's very emotional tie with the cars (one fan even wrote the lyrics on an old DKW 3=6 bootlid for display);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlP_E_zIEAAw4EL.jpg)

The actual song may be heard here;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKxjhmsd60w

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4085427698_87fc193c30_b_1.jpg)

(Photo - Paul Horn)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 13, 2016, 01:49:14 pm

Now, our Brazilian friends are always working on ways we can enjoy our Deeks more.  One company, in particular, "Dekabras" (Translates roughly as "DKW Brothers") have recently developed a disc brake installation for installation on the pre-1962 drum braked cars.  Here are some photos of the new installation and below them, a video of a spirited demonstration of these brakes!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Imagem001-Coacutepia.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DSC00657.jpg)

http://vid752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11827824_1597675157161240_1965680364_n.mp4 (http://vid752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11827824_1597675157161240_1965680364_n.mp4)

Here is a link to their website:

http://www.dekabras.com.br/inicio.php (http://www.dekabras.com.br/inicio.php)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 13, 2016, 02:03:55 pm
Here is another great bit of Kiwiana for everybody - a beautiful photograph that appeared on Facebook this week of the Cable Price Auto Union Agency in Port Rd, Whangarei, circa 1965;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/CablePriceWhangarei.jpg)

Look at those brand new DKW F102's!  As a major fan of the Fintail Mercedes, I can't help being stirred by that too.

This other Kiwiana photo was also shared on a another Facebook group, of an unknown DKW 3=6 campaigning at a gymkhana in Christchurch in about 1963;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/132230_534579159888786_1823833831_o.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 15, 2016, 08:20:11 am
Again - also pasted on Facebook this week another Kiwiana Deek photo - a circa 1965 DKW F12 photographed circa 1975;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/kIWIf12.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: D,arcy on August 16, 2016, 12:46:34 pm
A sad sight - two Auto Union 1000S four doors abandoned near Balclutha
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKWs%20Balclutha.jpg)

Hullo, are these 2 DKW,s salvageable? From the photo,s they don,t look too bad. I am looking for a restoration project.

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on August 16, 2016, 02:52:26 pm
A going over with Meguires will soon fix them
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: D,arcy on August 16, 2016, 04:24:07 pm
    "yeah right",seriously has anyone had a look at them........
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 18, 2016, 06:43:37 am
D'Arcy - no I've never seen these two in person, I'm not sure if they are still there now.  I think the yellow one could have made its way to Mapua and used as spares for a concours resto which is underway there (I have the set of yellow doors with me to use on my restoration project).  There are other cars around though - better candidates.  PM me and I could point you in the right direction.
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 18, 2016, 08:47:44 am
THE RE-ESTABLISHMENT OF AUTO UNION AFTER WORLD WAR TWO - HOW TWO POWERFUL GROUPS EACH ATTEMPTED TO RESTART AUTO UNION - AND ONLY ONE SUCCEEDED


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/6e81620e-e6af-4739-8f8d-982335acc526-normal.jpg)

In previous posts I mentioned the re-establishment of the Post-War Auto Union GmbH - which occurred officially on 3 September 1949 - 10 years to the day after the start of the Second World War.

In an interesting aside - this re-establishment in Ingolstadt, almost did not happen, due to a pivotal figure in the histories of Volkswagen and Auto Union - Baron Claus-Detlof von Oertzen.  In fact, there would have been no post-war Auto Union imports into New Zealand, or Volkswagen imports, if it had not been for the instrumental visits that the Baron and his wife made to New Zealand through the 1950's.

Not only that, but Audi as we know it today would not have existed now - and in a larger sense, Volkswagen too.

 The "aside" I am talking of occurred just after World War II very far from both Germany and NZ - in South Africa. This is a twist that no Audi history I've ever read mentions.... We'll read here about William Werner, who we discussed in previous post -  who after having lost his DKW F9 prototype (later sent to Australia) to the British, he then made his way to Holland, immediately post war.... the intrigues of the involvement of MI5....

Baron Claus-Detlof von Oertzen (1894 – 1991)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/VW1952.jpg)

To illustrate the point of how close none of the post-war Auto Union success ever came to happening at all (in the sense that two seperate, very influential parties made seperate attempts at re-establishing the company - which could have both failed)  - I've translated a German article from galimoto.co.za for you;

"Since World War II several serious attempts have been made to produce a totally South African car. One of these companies had the intention to build a Borgward factory and manufacturing facility in Johannesburg in the late fifties.

The legendary Apie le Roux, Director General of the Borgward concessionaire in Transvaal, Vanroux Motors - supported by "Mr Gold", the then Finance Minister, Nico Diederichs - had, in 1958, a company with a capital of one million pounds. Other partners in this enterprise were the politician Jan Haak and "Captain" ( "Kappie") Strydom. Carl Borgward GmbH (Bremen) helped to finance this, and the main intention of the company to construct  the very popular "Isabella" car in South Africa.

Nico Diederichs
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/nicolaas_diederichs_medium.jpg)

Carl Borgward
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Borgward.jpg)

Whilst a "marriage" of some sort could be brought about, by the time the project was swinging into action, Borgward themselves and the Vanroux Motors company were in trouble.  Apparently, the Vanroux Motors company failed to sufficiently convince the government of the necessity of tariff protection for the Isabella project. As the Borgward company was liquidated in 1961, and the Borgward operation was eventually moved to Mexico - the project fell quite flat.

                                        ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

However, the Borgward undertaking from 1960 was not the first attempt at an independent local auto industry, which could go on the international market.  Baron von Oertzen had tried to build a factory in South Africa, of the most popular model of the famous company Auto Union - it was his intention that the DKW, should be built for the African,  and world market.

DKW Meisterklasse cars from Zschopau reached the South African market in July 1933, imported by Haak's garage in Pretoria and Johannesburg. Towards the end of that year, this company also announced the arrival of other vehicles from the Auto Union Stable: the Audi, the Wanderer and the Horch. However, it was the DKW, who conquered the South African market and soon became a bestseller among smaller cars was on the local market.

The car dealer Williams Hunt also acquired the DKW Sole -Franchise and marketed the cars as "the German Volkswagen" for 245 pounds. A trade agreement between South Africa and Germany, after Germany was obliged to buy half of the South African wool harvest, meant that the car price was reduced to 197 pounds and ten shillings. The price remained at that level until the war broke out in 1939.

Baron von Oertzen was the driving force behind the Auto Union AG activity in South Africa - with their postal address as P.O. Box 586, Johannesburg - and he managed to lure the remarkable 16-cylinder racing car to South Africa, where in 1937 participated in the South African Grand Prix. The race cars were driven by Ernst von Delius and Bernd Rosemeyer on January 16. The victory of this race car presupposing an advert in the Cape Times published on Monday, January 18, in which the six liters Auto Union race car next to the standard car, the 700cc DKW passenger car was ready. The buyers were thus made aware that these products were "from the same stable".

The racing success of the Auto Union cars impressed the local public and later in 1937 was the fact that the DKW had become the best selling German car in South Africa, by a large margin. A formal road test of the passenger car also appeared in the Cape Times of July 2 of that year.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/veteraanmotors2-3_01_1.jpg)

During World War II the DKW factory was destroyed. It lay in the Russian sector, the company and what on the site was left of it, was nationalized by the Russians. The DKW brand name was sold to a Swiss company that was going to make the engine parts in Switzerland, whereas the body of future DKWs would be produced in Holland at the Pluvier Motorenfabriek. The cars, which had been so popular before the war, were to be built in the (as proposed pre-war) three-cylinder version - soon also with a streamlined body, which had been developed before the war. Some prototype models with a body made of steel were built in Holland.

Baron von Oertzen returned in 1948, after a stay in China, to South Africa. He kept in touch with his former colleagues, and was informed of the Swiss-Dutch partneship which involved two of his colleagues from Zschopau, Dr. Gerhard Müller and Dr. Wilhelm Werner, the former chief engineer at Auto Union. He invited them and their Dutch partner, Greeve, to Johannesburg in order to examine with them the possibility of moving the Swiss-Dutch operation to South Africa. Greeve, who had almost insurmountable difficulties with the entry permits for German workers into Holland was extremely happy with the idea to move production to South Africa. The new post-war (installed in 1948) South African government took on many skilled workers from Europe and was very German-friendly.

Leading South African politicians and influential business entrepreneurs, Hendrik van Eck, founder of the South African steel giant Iscor were also German-inclined and friendly.

Noel Gilfillan,  the Auto Union legal adviser before the war, in Johannesburg, acted as spokesman for the group consisting of him, the mining director, H. C. Payne, Von Oertzen, Müller and Werner. December 1948 he began negotiations with the various government departments, with the aim to oppose pure car assembly operations and  to start a car production industry in earnest.

In a letter (29 December 1948) to the Secretary of State for Trade and Economy in Pretoria, Gilfillan presented the plans of the entrepreneurs in general terms. In the first phase, the company would build an improved version of the pre-war 2-cylinder cars, two prototypes of which had already been made in Holland. In the second phase, which would have gone into operation around 1951, the 3-cylinder model would be introduced. The preparation of the six-cylinder, four-wheel drive-2½-ton trucks, which were developed shortly before the outbreak of war, would also be considered. .

The intention of the letter to the Secretary of State was to obtain permission to transfer funds to Switzerland and to the Netherlands to buy the DKW trademark and the import of machinery and presses for car manufacturing. Baron von Oertzen was willing to spend 25,000 pounds for the purpose; then a small fortune.

The Ministry received this favourably and a meeting of the DKW-entrepreneurs and Eric Louw, the trade and industry minister, was agreed upon in March 1949. At the meeting the Minister was presented with a letter of nine pages. In that document, the government was asked to allow a certain outflow of capital as well as the entry of skilled workers and those assisting in obtaining permission to leave their country of origin. The South African Government was also asked to support the request of the contractor on the question of financial assistance through the parastatal Industrial Development Corporation (IDC). President of IDC was Hendrik van Eck, a personal friend of the Von Oertzens.

Although Gilfillan and his colleagues had not yet officially approached the IDC until June 1949 for the purpose of financial assistance, the IDC already had a list of key personnel, which would be required for starting the proposed operation in South Africa. In a letter dated July 7, 1949, the IDC asked the government, to investigate the careers (or backgrounds) of the twelve Germans involved - starting at the top with Von Oertzen - using "official channels".

This letter triggered the government machine and a flood of letters went back and forth between the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Foreign Office in Pretoria, the South African economy Attaché in Frankfurt, the Board of Trade and Industry in Pretoria and the IDC.

In a confidential letter (08/31/1949) South African consulate in Frankfurt to the Secretary of State for Trade and Economy in Pretoria, it was alleged that "it is quite difficult to obtain the required information" (about the backgrounds of the twelve persons). And the letter continued: "Apart from the fact that you wish that the matter will remain confidential (in Frankfurt it will remain confidential) however, because the local occupying powers in Germany would eventually learn the intentions of South Africa, it could the mean that serious obstacles are placed in your way. Therefore, it is hardly possible to obtain the information directly from official sources, where it is available readily. This delays the search. However, it is already some progress has been made and it is hoped that with the cooperation of the Consul it will be possible to you give an in-detail report in the near future. "

It is clear that the South African Consul had good relations with his English colleagues, because at this point the British Secret Service (MI5) came to the rescue.

After trying for months to get more information about the twelve people in the Documentation Centre of the Allied occupation forces in Berlin - where information on the time was kept 1932-1945 - the consulate secretary, Mr Smit, wrote in a confidential message to Pretoria (6 January 1950): "efforts to learn the whereabouts of the above persons by the Auto Union and other German sources were almost entirely unsuccessful. Finally, kindly helped the British Secret Service and after several months they provided the following information with the caveat that they could not vouch for the complete accuracy of the information ".

The CVs of six people, including From Oertzen, followed. Of the other six  MI5 reported that they existed, and should still be in the Russian zone. The British Secret Service also argued that they needed the full names and dates of birth of such persons to check whether they had ever been associated with National Socialism (the Nazi party) or similar institutions.

The use of MI5 came too late; Smit said in his letter that the Russians had already begun with the production of spare parts DKW in Zschopau, and that a new Auto Union company in Ingolstadt was founded, which would make commercial vehicles. Plans for the manufacture of a new generation three-cylinder DKW passenger cars in Dusseldorf at the time were already well advanced. The opposition group (to re-establish Auto Union car production), led by Dr Richard Bruhn (who had been manufacturing parts for pre-war DKW's and selling these successfully since 1945 in Ingolstadt) had obtained financial assistance from the American "Marshall Plan" and were well on their way.

The re-establishment of Auto Union at Ingolstadt
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/F89%20Photo%2012-02-2015%201%2040%2029%20pm_1.png)

Given the re-establishment of the Auto Union in West Germany and IFA in  East Germany at Zschopau and Eisenach, the Swiss-Dutch and South African initiatives in 1950, essentially failed.

 Von Oertzen turned his attention to Volkswagen without knowing that in little more than ten years, the company to which he had such close ties, should be part of the VW family.

The first Dusseldorf built DKW in South Africa was probably the car which the Swedish consul imported in Pretoria. (This car still exists and is driven regularly by its owner Johan Krige -Ed)

Johan Krige's DKW F89 - the first post war DKW in South Africa;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Johan%20Krige%20F89P%201950.jpg)

In March 1955 was the first major shipment of  DKW's arrived in the port of Cape Town. The cars were on display in the showroom of the car dealer Stanley Porter and sold for 700 pounds, 150 pounds more expensive than the VW Beetle.

Production of new post war DKW's at Dusseldorf

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11703073_602096679943269_3607328689608834023_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12243525_958109794227569_2490925636476007420_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11698659_901163509922198_6898061873122733095_n.jpg)

The DKW soon became a very popular car again, also in motorsport - on the racetrack and in rallies - well-proven. The South African owners of the very willing cars with the two-stroke engines regretted the change in the holder when the firm of Daimler-Benz went to Volkswagen and no other cars were imported.
"

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11694159_608308312655439_939146364241777143_n.jpg)


Dr. Bruhn and Dr. Werner would meet once again in Auto Union business - but only when Dr. Werner rejoined Auto Union in 1956 and replaced Dr. Bruhn as the Director of Auto Union GmbH.  Dr. Bruhn was awarded West Germany's Grand Cross of Merit in 1953 for his entrepreneurial services to the nation, nine years before his death in 1964.

Today, Dr Bruhn's legacy is one of some controversy - especially due to the 2013 investigations into Audi (Auto Union) involvement in Slave labour during WWII.

Dr. Richard Bruhn - 1886-1964

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Richard%20Bruhn.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 22, 2016, 03:05:42 pm
WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU HAVE A DKW THAT IS TOO FAR GONE TO RESTORE.......
 AND A MESSERSCHMITT THAT IS BEYOND SAVING? EASY!................
YOU BUILD A FRANKENSCHMITT!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Frankenschmitt1.jpg)

"Here's the story of the Frankenschmitt;

The Dr. Frankenstein in this instance is one Dan Gibson of Texas, who bought the car off eBay over a year ago when it was a rusting hulk of a failed project. The original idea: Take a three-wheel 1956 Messerschmitt KR200 and convert it to front-wheel-drive. The donor heart for the original mad scientist? Why a DKW 3=6 of course, the Auto Union's answer to the VW Beetle, powered by a two-stroke, three-cylinder engine.

Over the past year, Gibson has slowly chipped away at every hurdle that kept the Frankenschmitt off the road, from rust all over the body that's been stretched four feet for its new engine, to a lack of easy parts for his Germanic creation. At one point, frustrated by clutch demons, Gibson gave up and put Frankenschmitt up for sale on Craigslist, but then changed his mind.

By October, the zombie was roaring through the suburbs, a tiny car carrying an impressive amount of hard work. It also fits right in with the rest of his garage, which includes a well-restored Autocar. "

Here is a video of the Frankenschmitt actually on the move;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ie6vW8ro7s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ie6vW8ro7s)

Here is the completed product;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Frankenschmitt2.jpg)

(Text courtesy of Jalopnik.com from 2010)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 23, 2016, 09:37:46 am
Optional extras on your Deek...

Back in the late '50's and early '60's not only could you have the chance to smoke, just like your Deek  :o :o ;D;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12400789_984522964919585_849226482185457538_n_1.jpg)

But, you could have it equipped with a large list of factory optional extras.  In addition to these, there were several aftermarket things available too;

The Factory bits were typically ordered from a catalogue like this;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10325323_10205316677624640_6009369790380137245_n.jpg)


Here are some of them-

SAXOMAT AUTOMATIC CLUTCH

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw-540.jpg)

CHROMED AUXILIARY HORN RING
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/s_MLB_v_F_f_233796622_9197.jpg)

HERE ARE 3 IN ONE PHOTO - REAR WINDOW SUNSHADE, REAR WINDOW LUGGAGE RACK AND AN OFFSIDE MIRROR
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/CIP1611.jpg)

SNOW CHAINS
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1000schaines%201.jpg)

SOME MORE IN THIS PHOTO - SUN ROOF WITH DRAUGHT EXCLUDER, FRONT FENDER "TELL TALES" AND MUD FLAPS
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto-union-1000-s-10.jpg)

SKI RACKS
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DKW_1962_03_2_2.jpg)

TOW BAR
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10258641_10202760353866763_820961392279633090_o.jpg)

SEE THE HORN RING AGAIN - BUT CHECK THE PERIOD LUGGAGE RACK BELOW THE DASHBOARD
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/blue%201000s%20interior2.jpg)

REVERSING LAMP (THIS HAD TO COME WITH A SWITCH ON THE GEARBOX)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10409003_855643667807516_1504451073462623437_n.jpg)

BADGE BAR (THIS CAME FRONT AND REAR)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1978854_10152552686906905_1741451519828130865_n.jpg)

6 VOLT BOSCH SPOTLAMPS ON SPECIAL OVERRIDERS
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10264817_1005773969461151_504528154501642784_n.jpg)

RADIO - THIS REQUIRED A SEPARATE POWER SUPPLY, WHICH WAS MOUNTED ABOVE THE PASSENGERS FEET
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/376390_2531450137073_1578096188_2286657_730715508_n.jpg)

ANOTHER ONE OF THE FULL-LENGTH SUNROOF
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1506379_664456920252284_581071067_o_1.jpg)

WINDSCREEN SUNSHADE AND HEADLAMP PEAKS
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4CAR-Auto-Union-1000S.jpg)


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 24, 2016, 02:21:11 pm
The DKW-Hirondelle

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Hirondelle.0.jpg)

In 1953, Dutch racing driver and engine tuner, Henk van Zalinge built a "HVZ" based on a pre-war Alfa Romeo 6C-2300, with a self-made steel body. Very soon the old Alfa engine was replaced by a 2.5 litre Riley engine.

In 1954 he started to build his first Hirondelle, with a Porsche RSK engine in front of the Opel rear axle in a self-made chassis and with an aluminium body made by Rijnplaat. Originally the gearbox was from an MG TD, but soon this was replaced by an adapted Porsche gearbox.

The choice of the name "Hirondelle" in itself is an interesting thing...In the Saint books by Leslie Charteris, Simon Templar drove a Hirondel (of which the misspelling is actually Hirondelle). The problem that the television producers had when they started to produce the 1960's Saint TV series was that the Hirondel was a fictional car. They decided to go with a contemporary car, and had two hot new sports cars to choose from: the Volvo P1800 or the Jaguar XK-E. Volvo was happy to supply a beautiful white P1800 for the show, leaving Jaguar to regret their decision not to provide a XK-E (something they rectified in the 1970's by giving The Return of The Saint show a white XJ-S)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/hirondel.gif)

THE LOGO OF THE MYTHICAL HIRONDEL

Car and Driver editor, Waren Wieth remarked that the Hirondel "makes Mr. Bond's Aston Martin sound like a rental from Hertz" in his "Hymn to a Hirondel."

"The Last Hero

Some who saw the passage of the Saint that night will remember it to the end of their lives; for the Hirondel, as though recognising the hand of a master at its wheel, became almost a living thing. King of the Road its makers called it, but that night the Hirondel was more than a king: it was the incarnation and apotheosis of all cars. For the Saint drove with the devil at his shoulder, and the Hirondel took its mood from his. If this had been a superstitious age, those who saw it would have crossed themselves and sworn that it was no car at all they saw that night but a snarling silver fiend that roared through London on the wings of an unearthly wind.
"

                                                               ------------------------------------------------------------

So leaving the mythical cars aside - let's head back to the real things;

The second Hirondelle had a DKW engine and self-made chassis and aluminium body. This one was used for the Blériot race in 1959 (Henk van Zalinge & Hans Hugenholtz in Paris at Bleriot Rally 22 July 1959).

The third  Hirondelle also had a DKW engine, with an aluminium body by Vermeulen (from Haarlem). This car looked more like a Formula Junior racer. Here it is in anger;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/HirondelleDKWFJ.0.jpg)

There is a film by the Amsterdam photographer Ed van der Elsken where he drives a (normal) DKW and he visits Henk van Zalinge's workshop to get his engine tuned.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Hirondelle-DKW-Formule-Junior-1961-005.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/download.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Hirondelle-DKW-Formule-Junior-1961-006.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/28029596142_6e4cdbdbfa.jpg)

There is a short video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZTvuIHedMw (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZTvuIHedMw)

Henk van Zalinge built 14 Hirondelles, of which one was the FJ-DKW, one with the Porsche engine - most were DKW-engined.  He raced some of these cars himeself, most notably having a win at Zandvoort on 21 May 1956.

Henk van Zalinge died on 5 February 2006 at age 83.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Racingteam_Holland_en_Prins_Bernhard_1964.jpg)

Racing Team Holland visiting Dutch Prince Bernhard. Left to right: Rob Slotemaker , Ben Pon (son of the inventor of the VW Kombi) , Henk van Zalinge and Prince Bernhard (1964)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 24, 2016, 02:53:02 pm
"Every subsequent Audi owes the Auto Union 1000 a vast debt"

(Practical Classics magazine)

I couldn't have put it better myself.....

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/01000Spracticalcars.jpg)

(CLICK FOR LARGER)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 29, 2016, 05:15:23 am
This last weekend, our Brazilian DKW friends celebrated their annual "Blue Cloud" event at Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil - this is held at the Palace Hotel em Poços De Caldas .  The first photograph here shows the highlight of the event - the "blue cloud";

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/0001.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud16.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud167.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud163.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud165.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud162.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud166.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud164.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud161.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud168.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud169.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1612.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1613.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1611.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1615.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1614.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1616.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/BlueCloud1610.jpg)

(http://)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 30, 2016, 08:53:03 am
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Fahti-Caravans.jpg)

The perfect attachment for your DKW Universal - the 1960 "Fahti" Caravan!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1960-fahti-caravan-1.jpg)

I'm not sure something like this would be allowed today!

 If you are travelling by car and caravan, you can save a lot of space by coupling the caravan to your station wagon and use the resulting accordion part for the beds. It was a prototype made in 1960 by the German company Fahti Fahrzeugbau, which was in business from 1957 until 1969. I don't know if the prototype was ever in production, as one drawback is that you needed to remove the rear doors of the towing vehicle.

At least the end result looks somewhat cozy.

The car is a 1959/60 Auto Union F-94U 1000 Universal.  I don't think we want to entertain the inevitable "Farty Caravan" jokes.... ;-)

One joker commented "It's great, except that every time I accelerate or brake I hear an accordion play".

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Fahti_Prospekt_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10344799_850882838283599_2894573679341841353_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on August 31, 2016, 08:42:03 am
This story from last year, posted on "Fourtitude.com" - some of you may have read about this car before;

The 1954 DKW-Michaux Spider

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-DKW-Auto-Union-Michaux-Spider-1954-409-960x480.jpg)

"For today’s find of the day, we’re turning to Europe where one reader has alerted us to an incredibly unique 1950s era Auto Union – DKW based sportscar we’re dubbing the Micheaux Spider. It appears to be one of a kind and is currently for sale at The Stolze Collection in the Netherlands.


For the history of the car, we first turned to the dealership that currently has it. They told us they stumbled across the car in Lorient, France and on a visit to Atelier DKW Service. There he met the car’s owner who claimed to be the second owner of the car, having bought it from the original owner. This man offered a brief history of the car.

According to the story, the original owner was the Belgian Auto Union DKW importer at the time, the Simon Michaux Garage located at 49 Rue de Hollande in Brussels. Mr. Michaux owner of the firm had this little spider created as an 18th birthday present for his daughter.


The designer of the car’s bodywork is unknown but there are some obvious inspirations. Audi Tradition noted similarities to the 1954 Lancia B24 Aurelia Spider. To our American eye, there’s a good deal of 1953 C1 Corvette, including the tail design and also the wrap-around windshield.


For mechanicals, the Michaux Spider was based on the chassis of an Auto Union DKW Sonderklasse. However, all of the car’s bodywork and also the interior were hand made. The story goes that a special engine was also installed, though details are limited. We do know that it requires a fuel mix, suggesting it is a 2 stroke.

Though given to his daughter, Simon Michaux was active in racing and soon began to use the car for road rallies.


At some point during the car’s current ownership or perhaps by the second owner, the car was examined by DKW specialist Daniel Preener who confirmed that the engine was specially made for this car. Just how it differs has not been divulged, though further repairs have been done including new brakes, bearings and seal, brake hoses, master cylinder, handbrake mechanism, carburetor overhauled, a new fuel pump and new head gasket including a new 6-volt battery. The car is said to be completely original and complete, including the convertible top with side windows.

Having never seen this car before, we reached out to Audi Tradition before putting together this story. They informed us that the car is a custom built body not by the factory and confirmed that it uses the chassis of a 1954/55 DKW F91 3=6 Sonderklasse."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-DKW-Auto-Union-Michaux-Spider-1954-419-600x375.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-DKW-Auto-Union-Michaux-Spider-1954-414-600x375.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-DKW-Auto-Union-Michaux-Spider-1954-417-600x375.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-DKW-Auto-Union-Michaux-Spider-1954-411-600x375.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1954-DKW-Auto-Union-Michaux-Spider-1954-412.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 01, 2016, 02:00:02 pm
DKW's great postwar Rally history

Between 1954 and 1964 DKW drivers won more than 100 championship titles, 150 overall victories, 35 team first prizes and 2,500 class victories

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/d1110_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12801184_608183732667897_1732370925771747679_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12039751_1025197470852134_3228999597491451370_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Clark%20Jim_image002_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Aspach51.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13612334_1087755504596330_7470204527984838565_n_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Coupes%20Benelux%20Zandvvort%201962.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13116337_1050749971630217_3523701298273142848_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/circuitdesArdennes1957.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/d0811_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/cpia4decpiadeimagem055%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Zandvoort1956.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/wpxb_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Vienna-Budapest1963_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/WM_Silverstone-1957-06-01f-010_1.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on September 01, 2016, 07:20:04 pm
Looks as though a few of them are not sure which way is up ;D
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 02, 2016, 11:04:00 am
We've spoken about some famous owners of post war DKW cars - here is another; Max Schmeling;

 "Max" Schmeling (28 September 1905 – 2 February 2005) was a German boxer who was heavyweight champion of the world between 1930 and 1932. His two fights with Joe Louis in 1936 and 1938 are amongst his most famous events.  The 1938 fight became known as "the Battle of the Century"

Max Schmeling owned a 1957 DKW 3=6 F93 Coupe, and by agreement with Auto Union - agreed to pose for this marketing photograph, with his wife, German-Czech actress, Anny Ondra;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Maxschmeling.jpg)

Max was an astute businessman - and in the wisest of moves, had invested in Coca Cola, and opened his own bottling plant in the 1950's - which led him to great business success. He managed his Coca Cola business up to his death at age 99.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/max-schmeling-coca-cola-403x550.jpg)

He was, too, a man of compassion. During the Nazi purge of Jews from Berlin, he personally saved the lives of two Jewish children by hiding them in his apartment. It was not the first time that Schmeling defied the Nazi regime's hatred for Jews. As the story goes, Hitler let it be known through the Reich Ministry of Sports that he was very displeased at Schmeling's relationship with Joe Jacobs, his Jewish fight promoter and wanted it terminated, but Schmeling refused to bow even to Hitler.

He was known as one of the most generous philanthropists in Germany. Schmeling treasured camaraderie and friendship and somehow, each of his ring opponents became his friend. He regularly and quietly gave the down-and-out Joe Louis gifts of money, and the friendship continued after death: Schmeling paid for his erstwhile rival and longtime friend Joe Louis' funeral.



Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: slowburn on September 02, 2016, 04:49:36 pm
great post
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 05, 2016, 09:10:17 am
Selling the Munga in the USA....

In the USA, the "Munga" name was deemed too unwieldy - and the car was sold as the "Bronco".  As always, click on the picture for a larger version therof:

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5294792770_154721ced3_o_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5294195519_9a64d43123_o_1.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/5294194515_7ba02f0d2f_o_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 07, 2016, 04:36:27 pm
I have written in these pages, almost exclusively, about post-war Auto Union cars (more specifically the period 1954-64).  I have always felt this to be a particularly neglected part of Auto Union (Audi) history, and that by writing about it, I would bring some of this very interesting history about these great cars to light.

Today, however, I'm going to make a quick foray into a pre-war story - which is still ongoing - this then, is the case of an Auto Union Type C Grand Prix car that has been missing in Africa since 1937, and is still actively being searched for.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Auto-Union-Type-C-1937-Grand-Prix-Donington-Park-Great-Britain-Driver-Bernd-Rosemeyer-1024x768.jpg)

This newspaper article appeared earlier this year in South Africa in the "Wheels 24" column of a local paper;

"R100k reward offered for missing race car in SA

2016-01-20

Ferdi de Vos



Cape Town - Somewhere in South Africa an invaluable, irreplaceable piece of motor sport history – the sixth, and probably last, Type C Auto Union Grand Prix car of 1937 – may still be hidden away locally.

Well, that’s the rumour… and it has been going around for years.

It seems at least one man still avidly believes it is stashed away in a barn, on a farm, in a storage yard or an old garage somewhere in the country…

R100 000 reward

So convinced, he seems that he has recently taken out an ad in the local weekly paper People’s Post requesting anyone with information on the whereabouts of this exceptional vehicle to come forward.

He is even offering a reward of R100 000 for any clues that could help him find the unique, inimitable race car – now valued at $12 million (the equivalent of R202-million)…

He’s not just anybody, though.

Have you seen this car? Send us photographs via email or via Facebook and Twitter.

A veritable expert searching

While a local attorney given as reference in the advertisement did not want to divulge any details, local veteran journalist Adrian Pheiffer confirmed he is none other than German automobile historian, vintage cars specialist and Auto Union racing history expert Martin Schroder.

Herr Schroder has since 1973 studied the history of Auto Union GP automobiles, is the co-author of a book on the subject published in 1979 and was instrumental in finding and returning a Type D Auto Union GP car from the erstwhile Soviet Union.

In 2007 he also uncovered a fake Type D that was up for auction through Christie – which was then promptly withdrawn.

But why after all these years is he still searching for the missing Type C in South Africa?

The ‘Silver Bullets’ in SA

The monstrous, all-conquering Auto Union Grand Prix cars were built in Zwickau, Germany, between 1933 and 1939.

They dominated the pre-war racing era with V16 engines producing over 350kW, spinning their wheels in all gears on puny cross-ply tyres even at speeds above 160km/h.

The cars were purpose-built to battle for supremacy with rival Mercedes throughout the Thirties, and reached speeds of up to 340km/h with legendary drivers such as Achille Varzi, Hans Stuck, Tazio Nuvolari and Rosemeyer.

Weighing only 850kg the final Type D car used a 3.0-litre 60-degree V12 twin-supercharged mill to deliver nearly 350kW at 7000rpm, while the earlier Type A to Type C cars, even with bigger V16 engines, from 4.4-litre to 6.0-litre in capacity, producing up to 850Nm of torque, weighed even less.

According to Audi only five original Grand Prix cars survive today and the company owns three of them – the most recent addition (added in 2012) a Type D twin-supercharged V12 model lost behind the Iron Curtain for decades.

The Type C, as the final evolution of the 45-degree V16 engine before being replaced by the V12, was arguably the best of all, and the version brought to South Africa.

It was legendary race promoter Brud Bishop, organiser of the pre-WW2 South African GPs, who got the racers here. He convinced Baron Klaus von Oertzen, the man who later brought Volkswagen to South Africa, that bringing out the Auto Union racers would generate a tremendous sales boost for DKW and German cars in general.

Von Oertzen eventually agreed and the team shipped out to Africa after the 1936 Grand Prix season for some friendly competition with locally piloted Alfa Romeo, Bugatti, ERA and other British cars.

They would participate in the third South African GP in East London on 1 January 1937 and the first Grosvenor GP in Cape Town on 16 January 1937 and then conclude their African tour a fortnight later in Johannesburg around the new Lord Howe circuit.

Legendary German ace


Their headline act was none other than legendary ace Bernd Rosemeyer, the newly crowned 1936 world champion after winning three races (Germany, Switzerland and Italy) as well as two non-championship Grand Prix, supported by Ernst von Delius.

Much hype and media attention surrounded the team’s arrival in December 1936 and the impressive cars were dubbed the “silver bullets” by a local newspaper.

In keeping with his daredevil image Rosemeyer was flown from Berlin to East London by his new bride Elly Beinhorn, Germany’s most famous aviatrix, in a Messerschmitt BF-108 Taifun ’plane.

The rest of the contingent included the two C-type cars, eight mechanics, a scientist to test for coast carburetion density, a tyre specialist, a timekeeper and manager, and also spares including 500 sparkplugs, 146 tyres of various sizes and 60 wheels.

After the Grosvenor Grand Prix race at Pollsmoor, won by Von Delius with Rosemeyer second, events get murky. After inspecting the Earl Howe circuit in Johannesburg it was decided the cars were unsuitable for the track, and the team pulled out of the event.

Instead, only one car was sent to Johannesburg for a public demonstration, with the second remaining in Cape Town. It is this 1937 V16-engined Type C chassis that Schröder believes never got back to Germany.

The paper trail stops in Cape Town and no records exist of its passage back to Zwickau."

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/rosemeyer-1936.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto-union-c.gif)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 09, 2016, 09:13:14 am
The 1955 Circuit of Ireland Rally

The Circuit of Ireland International Rally is an annual rally, which was first held in 1931 making it the third oldest rally in the world. The event is also a round of the Northern Ireland Rally Championship and the Irish Tarmac Rally Championship

Here is wonderful period film of Ian Scott-Watson driving his DKW out of the cargo hold of a Bristol freighter for the rally (this was not the car that Jim Clark first raced in, this car - "5 CMD", was damaged in accident on the 1955 International Scottish Rally, where it rolled);

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-32150727 (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-32150727)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/_82064086_circuitofireland.jpg)

Interestingly enough - Wikipedia states that the 1955 event was cancelled?  The film appears to contradict this.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1955CircuitofIreland.jpg)





Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 14, 2016, 09:05:06 am
A little known story outside of Argentina – Fangio and DKW


El Maestro ("The Master"), – there really isn’t much more that could be said about one the greatest drivers the world has ever known - Juan Manuel Fangio.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fangio.jpeg)
 
To clear the formalities, I’ll quote from Wikipedia – “Juan Manuel Fangio Déramo (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈfanχjo], Italian pronunciation: [ˈfandʒo]; 24 June 1911 – 17 July 1995), nicknamed El Chueco ("the bowlegged one", also commonly translated as "bandy legged") or El Maestro ("The Master"), was an Argentine racing car driver. He dominated the first decade of Formula One racing, winning the World Drivers' Championship five times.
From childhood, he abandoned his studies to pursue auto mechanics. In 1938, he debuted in Turismo Carretera, competing in a Ford V8. In 1940, he competed with Chevrolet, winning the Grand Prix International Championship and devoted his time to the Argentine Turismo Carretera becoming its champion, a title he successfully defended a year later. Fangio then competed in Europe between 1947 and 1949 where he achieved further success.
He won the World Championship of Drivers five times—a record which stood for 47 years until beaten by Michael Schumacher—with four different teams (Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz and Maserati), a feat that has not been repeated. A member of the Formula 1 Hall of Fame, he is regarded by many as one of the greatest F1 drivers of all time and holds the highest winning percentage in Formula One – 46.15% – winning 24 of 52 Formula One races he entered. Fangio is the only Argentine driver to have won the Argentine Grand Prix, having won it four times in his career—the most of any driver.
After retirement, Fangio presided as the honorary president of Mercedes-Benz Argentina from 1987, a year after the inauguration of his museum, until his death in 1995. In 2011, on the centenary of his birth, Fangio was remembered around the world and various activities were held on the occasion of his birthday”.
After his retirement Fangio poured energy into his Mercedes-Benz concession - Fangio had acquired the Argentine Mercedes concession in the mid 1950’s. He was appointed President of Mercedes-Benz Argentina in 1974, and its Honorary President for Life in 1987.
His company sold Mercedes and DKW cars from the mid-1950’s on;

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FangioDKW5.jpg)

Below, this photograph from an article on the DKW in the Australian “Wheels” magazine, shows Fangio’s soft spot for the DKW.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FangioDKW4.png)
 
In 1965 Fangio drove a DKW special (a coupe made by shortening a four door model) at a race at the Interlagos race track, nicknamed “Mickey Mouse” He was enamoured with the car – but found it difficult to drive – due to the race-tuned two stroke engine.
(Below, Fangio driving “Mickey Mouse” in 1965 at Interlagos);
 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/fangio.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FangioDKW3.jpg)
 
Fangio enlisted the help of a young Augusto Ulderico Cicaré (born May 25, 1937 in Polvaredas, Argentina) an Argentine inventor, engineer and aviation designer to see what could be done to improve the DKW car and modernise its powerplant.
Cicaré, of course, was (and is) a rather interesting fellow. At the age of 11, Cicaré built his first four stroke engine that he used to drive a washing machine. In this same period he converts the engine of a car for the use of propane gas instead of fuel. By age 15 he was constructing motorcycle engines. By 1964 – he had built and flown his own helicopter (teaching himself to fly it by chaining the helicopter to the ground).
At the request of Juan Manuel Fangio, he designed and built a new four-stroke engine with V4 construction, to be installed in DKW cars, using “ toothed” belts for the first time in Argentina.
This engine was exhaustively tested by Fangio, covering more than 100,000 km, with excellent results. Later he developed, using the same block, a version for international competition, with four valves per cylinder, obtaining a similar power than the European competition engines. This project was abandoned when the DKW company closed down.
The prototype engines survive at the Juan Manuel Fangio Museum at Balcarce (San José de Balcarce).

Today, at age 79 Augusto Cicaré, is still actively involved in aviation design work.

(Below, Fangio and Cicaré with the prototype DKW-Vemag V4 engine)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/FangioDKW.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 15, 2016, 05:32:52 pm
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1966_dkw_carcara_3.jpg)

The 1966 DKW-Vemag "Carcara" record car

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1966_dkw_carcara.jpg)

It may not sound like much now - but speeds of over 210 km/h in a car with an engine displacement of less than 1000cc was REALLY something back in the 1960's.  Such a car made its appearance in 1966 in Brazil.  Here is its story;

The father of the Carcará project was the editor of the magazine Quatro Rodas, Leszek Bilyk, owned by Brazilian publisher Editora Abril. He had great friendship with Jorge Lettry and was one of the instigators to build the car. In exchange for the magazine's logo appearing on the side of the record car, sponsorship was provided by Editora Abril, through the Quatro Rodas magazine.

The beautiful DKW Malzoni and the DKW-Vemag record car built in 1966 in Brazil were linked too - The two persons most closely associated with the early days of Puma are Genaro ("Rino") Malzoni and Jorge Lettry. Rino Malzoni was an Italian immigrant to Brazil who became successful as a lawyer and a sugar cane and cattle farmer. Malzoni liked racing and fast cars, and he set out to build his own racer with the help of Jorge Lettry, who headed the Vemag racing department. It was Lettry who tweaked the small DKW engines to produce upwards of 100 horsepower from 1000 cc's in the racing Malzonis. By all accounts, these cars did quite well against their larger displacement rivals.

Now followed eight months of secret work at the DKW-Vemag factory - which was already in the process of closing because the DKW-Vemag was bought by Volkswagen in 1965 and its car line, was to be discontinued in Brazil in 1967.

 Eventually eight months of work culminated on that June morning in Rio-Santos, where the driver chosen to break the record, Mário César de Camargo Filho was called to step up.  Only, he refused!

He felt, apparently, the car was unsafe to drive - in part he disliked the steering wheel. Naturally, this questioned driveability of the car created friction between "Marino", who was the "Number One" Competition driver for Team Vemag and Jorge Lettry, who at the last minute, called another driver, Norman Casari, who eventually accepted the challenge, but not before having the steering wheel replaced to a large diameter wheel.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1966_dkw_carcara_1_a.jpg)

Thus it came to be that, on 29 June 1966, the DKW-Vemag "Caracara" record car recorded 212,903 km/h over the measured mile.

It was 8:30 in the morning of the 29th of June 1966, Norman Casari took over the wheel of the "Caracara". The first run was made in 16.785 seconds at an average of 214,477 km/h. Twenty minutes later, Casari returned against the wind, with a speed of 211,329 km h. The average of the two runs-212,903 km / h - was established as the first  Brazilian and Latin-American record of absolute speed for a car of engine displacement of a 1000cc.  That record remains unbroken today in South America. The world record was broken in 2012 by the Kiwi "Project '64" team, setting a record of 146.595 mph (235.922 km/h) at the SCTA Speed Week at Bonneville Salt Flats. This was subsequently increased to 254 km/h in August 2016.

As a record for a naturally aspirated vehicle - the DKW-Vemag Caracara still holds the record as the fastest naturally aspirated car in the 1000cc class in the world (to my knowledge - anybody who could correct this, please do) .

Technical Details of the "Carcará" or "Caracara" or "Carcara" (various spellings have been used)

Single-seat, chassis truss type Formula Junior.
Motor central-rear DKW, 3 cylinder in line, two-stroke
Displacement: 1089 cm 3 .
Bore and stroke: 78 x 76 mm.
Power: 104 bhp DIN.
Torque: 13 mkgf.
Carburetion: Solex 44 PHH, double carburetor and cut double, forming three bodies.
Disc brakes on the front wheels and the rear drum.
Independent suspension on all 4 wheels, superposed arms, coil springs and hydraulic shock absorbers
aluminum body molded by hand.
Tires: Rear, Pirelli Cinturato 165-15; front, Spalla di Sicurezza 5.60-15 .

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1966_dkw_carcara_auto_esporte.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1966_dkw_carcara_2.jpg)


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: D,arcy on September 16, 2016, 10:04:26 pm
   A brilliant collection of articles which would go together as a great book. Keep up the excellent work, I,m looking
forward to more of the same. Thanks.

D,arcy
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 21, 2016, 09:51:05 am
Thanks for the kind words D'Arcy!

Now - I thought I'd show you the very attractive Beutler-bodied 1959 Auto Union 1000SP which was first shown at the 1959 Geneva Auto Salon.  It is not known why the car was built and what happened to it;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1959%20Geneva%20Salon.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1959%20DKW%20Auto%20Union%201000SP%20Coupe%20Beutler2geneva%20salon.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1959%20DKW%20Auto%20Union%201000SP%20Coupe%20Beutler1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1959%20DKW%20Auto%20Union%201000SP%20Coupe%20Beutler.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 22, 2016, 12:00:51 pm
The 1962 Araraquara race in Brazil

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AcervoAvallone.jpg)

This race was won (1st overall) by "Marinho" Mario Cesar Camargo Filho in a DKW Vemag (number 10); in 2nd place came Christian "Bino" Heins (who died in the Le Mans 24 Hours) in a  Renault; in 3rd place came  Antonio Carlos Avallone with a Simca Vedette (is that a "Chambord" model?) seen on the first row on this photo (number 58) and in place 4th  place was Antonio Luis Grecco in a Renault.

"Marinho" is one of the most celebrated of the DKW-Vemag competition drivers - born in 1937 he began racing DKW's in 1959 and had an illustrious career - including driving the famous DKW Carcará (although he did not drive it on its record breaking attempt).

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10e11onde.jpg)

Here is the same driver on the 1963 event;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1963%20-%20CACAIO%20EM%20ARAQUARA.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on September 22, 2016, 12:31:50 pm
I notice that a Graber DKW has pretty much the same lines as a Graber Alvis
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 23, 2016, 04:08:54 pm
 ;) ;)Brian

Here is another coachbuilt Deek - the first of the Malzoni's, built by Italian-Brazilian DKW magician Rino Malzoni;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/malzoni2.jpg)

Genaro "Rino" Malzoni was born in Italy in 1917 and came to Brazil with his parents in 1922, then five years old. The Malzoni family , however, had already been in Brazil for more than fifty years then. His grandfather, Genaro, immigrated in 1859, but unlike most Italians who came to Brazil in search of work, he came to Brazil to invest. Early on, he bought land, where he established a farm, and began to grow coffee, then the main Brazilian agricultural product.

Entrepreneurial, certainly, Genaro Malzoni not only produced, but also exported coffee. He opened a warehouse in Santos,and, along with his brothers, a bank, the Banking House Brothers Malzoni. Rino's father,  Francisco Neto Malzoni, was born in Brazil and went to Italy in 1898, when his father decided to return to the homeland. He studied there and later married Imaculatta Matarazzo, with whom he had four children: Genaro (Rino) , Catherine Fulvio and Tereza. Before Francisco decided to return to Brazil, the family faced the tumultuous years of World War I , between 1914 and 1918 - a very tough time in Italy.

The first automotive design Rino Malzoni worked on in the late 1940's, was  a huge Lancia  "torpedo" (open body with four seats) in a two - seat roadster, inspired by the sporting MG's popular with young Englishmen at the time. He also modified the front of an Austin A90 Atlantic Convertible in São Paulo. Another project ​​in the same genre was the modification of a Maserati coupe.

Soon he would create his own body from scratch...

The creation of the first GT Malzoni - and those cars immediately following - involved a simultaneous learning process. The first car took nearly two years to complete, with the parts being made ​​and modified numerous times. On the workshop of the wall was a drawing of the car in 1:1 scale - which was constantly modified.

Rino started the project with constructing a steel car.  The steel sheets and frames were covered with cardboard and the car hammered into shape over a series of body bucks.

The first car (sometimes called the Malzoni I) was an elegant 2 + 2 (with two small seats in the back) and was completed in 1963. A major mechanical change it brought was the incorporation of a floor gearshift, over the normal DKW column shift.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/malzoni3.jpg)


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/malzoni5.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on September 23, 2016, 07:16:35 pm
I can see why we didn't hear of these!!!!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 26, 2016, 03:52:00 pm
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MalzoniII2.jpg)

Then came the second car - this model, called the "GT Malzoni Type II" , was a much more evolved version, starting with the chassis shortening, which gave the car an agility that became legendary on the tracks with tighter turns. His great supporter was "Marinho" - Mário César de Camargo Filho - a racing driver for DKW- Vemag. It was he, who, after driving the 2 + 2 Malzoni I,  convinced Rino to build the new version - the Malzoni II.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MalzoniII1.jpg)

"Marinho" followed the step by step development of the car, including suggesting some details such as the lowering of the roofline. Even with steel body, was immediately transferred to Vemag racing team and successfully tested in some races.

It was, however, just a stepping stone to what was to come...

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MalzoniII.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on September 29, 2016, 04:55:55 pm
The Malzoni -DKW IV

That leads us to the final and finest of Malzoni's DKW based cars - the Malzoni IV, which, in time, became the Puma-DKW.

Here is Rino Malzoni with the car in 1965;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/malzoniIV.jpg)

There were two other steel-body versions of the earlier Malzoni GT. The last variant - now called the Type IV, was used as a sample for a much lighter version, in fiberglass. Commissioned by the Vemag Team and under the monitoring of the expert in fiber glass, Celso Calvari, three additional cars were created. At that time, this new technology was cutting-edge in Brazil.

The following step was preparing the new Type IV to be displayed at the São Paulo Auto Showroom in 1964. That demanded careful engineering. The prototype which was painted no less than five times before it was finally deemed ready - it arrived late at the show.

Despite all of the challenges, it was one of the highlights of the year at the show.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/tumblr_m8tozbqgOk1qflydqo1_500.jpg)

The fiberglass Malzoni GT production car was the result of a partnership among Rino, Marinho, Milton Masteguin and Roberto. That set the establishment of the Lumimari Company. The car, boasting the DKW Malzoni badge, was available in two versions. The first, the “Spartan”, which was used for racing, had a rudimentary finishing and little internal comfort. The other, geared to the ordinary public, was a more sophisticated one, with leather upholstery.

There were only a few units made of the first “commercial” Malzoni. The exact number is not known, but it is estimated that there were between 43 and 45 cars made. Despite the small number of cars, the car was tremendously successful and well-received by all who tested as it was publicized in the main Brazilian motoring magazines at the time.

By 1966, the model needed an update. Rino then decided to create a newer model, under the support of his friend and designer, Anísio Campos and Jorge Letry, a former Vemag racing manager,  the manufacturing of  the PUMA car came about - essentially a development of the Malzoni IV.

With a focus on the daily use, smoother lines, more precise measures and more careful finishing, the PUMA GT turned out to be an immediate success. Its success was even more obvious when it was awarded, in 1966, Brazil´s Most Beautiful Car by the magazine “Quatro Rodas” which included in its jury the Italian carrozziere Nucio Bertone. The success immediately impacted sales: 135 units were swiftly sold. This number could surely have been higher if Volkswagen which had bought Auto Union, in Germany and Vemag, in Brazil, had not discontinued the manufacturing of the DKW lineup. Those were hard days for PUMA, but Rino did not allow the crisis to interfere on his business..

The end of DKW-Vemag (due to the parent company Auto Union AG) in 1967 was a severe knock-back for Puma, which was just starting to get settled. But, Rino had an ace card up his sleeve: he recovered a dormant project he had. Thus, what was initially meant to be a race car made on the Karmann-Ghia’s platform, became the prototype of a new GT. After nine months of hard work, the Puma Volkswagen became reality. The small sports-car had a bright career: besides the success in Brazil, it was exported to more than 50 countries, including the United States, Japan and many others in Europe.

RACING

In March 1965, the first fiberglass Malzoni, 150kg lighter than the previous version, raced in its inaugural event in Recife. In May, it raced in Rio de Janeiro and lost to two powerful imported Abarths from the Simca Team, a result that would recur on the following month in Interlagos, São Paulo. In September, at the 400 Years GP in Rio de Janeiro, it came in second place, behind the Ferrari 250 GTO of Camilo Christófaro.

The second victory took place on the streets of Piracicaba, São Paulo, when Marinho, Eduardo Schurachio and Francisco Lameirão raced in their Malzonis. The three white prototypes were defiant and defended their positions superbly. Although with engines less powerful than those of their competitors, they were right on their heels. Besides the drivers from São Paulo, Marinho, Francisco Lameirão, Eduardo Schurachio and Anísio Campos who raced for Vemag, there was Norman Casari from Rio de Janeiro who, driving a Malzoni, claimed his second state championship title in 1967. He celebrated his victory over competitors with cars like a Ferrari GTO, an Alfa GTA and a Dacon KG Porsche.


Another driver to be remembered is Henrique Iwers, from Rio Grande do Sul. He came in fifth place in 1968 in the Antoninho Burlamaqui Road Race. In that same year, he arrived in third at Porto Alegre´s 500 Kilometer, right behind Chico Landi and Jan Balder´s BMW, a car utterly superior, and competed until the very last lap against the legendary Vitório Andreatta´s Ford “Carretera”.
The Malzonis from Vemag and independent drivers disputed at least 54 races, claiming fifteen victories, twelve second, and seven third places.

Some races were epic, like the GP Faria Lima in Interlagos which was raced in three heats. Francisco “Chiquinho” Lameirão won the first one and came in second on the second heat. Both Lameirão and José Carlos Pace, driving a Dacon Karmann-Ghia Porsche, put on an unforgettable high performance show. Pace was faster on the straight sectors, but in the winding sectors, Lameirão would be right on his tail. During the third heat, a stone punctured the Malzoni’s radiator and the damage spun him off.


Another legendary episode occurred in 1966 during the Brazilian One Thousand Miles. The Malzonis were dominating the race in great style with the youngsters Emerson Fittipaldi and Jan Balder coming in first, followed by Marinho and Schurachio. Running third, Camilo Christófaro and Eduardo Celidônio were driving the powerful Corvette Chevrolet with no less than a seven-liter engine. On the last refueling stop, the engine of the leading Malzoni faltered and refused to restart. Balder and Fittipaldi lost precious time in the pits and dropped down to third place. Marinho, who had taken the wheel to finish the race, was then the leader, with the Corvette Chevrolet getting dangerously closer. The end of the race was movie-like: Celidônio overtook when entering the final straight, leaving Marinho no chance for reaction. As mentioned by the innumerous chronicles published then, the highlights of the race were unforgettable to those who were mere spectators ...and to those who participated.

(most of the text has been translated from rinomalzoni.com)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/PMalzoni16.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/puma-gt-dkw-4.jpg)



Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on October 25, 2016, 10:49:53 am
And now for some local news...

Grahame Smith of Papamoa Beach in Tauranga has completed the restoration of his 1958 DKW 3=6 F94.  He is temporarily running a 60 bhp Wartburg engine, as his original 3=6 motor developed a crank issue.  As soon as the original motor is repaired it will be refitted.

Here it is:

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14716334_1244169422271246_3414935715800229964_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14713720_1244169515604570_5730433179018759444_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on October 25, 2016, 10:58:30 am
And....on another local note, I was in correspondence with Southwards Museum at Paraparaumu recently with regards their lovely original 1960 Auto Union 1000S Coupe equipped with Saxomat.  They obliged by sending me a lovely file photo of the car to share with you all - here it is:

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2013_0405_224713%201.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on October 25, 2016, 11:13:08 am
And still more local news!  This car arrived in Auckland on Friday from Nelson for a friend of mine - I'll be storing it and helping him get it going again.  Here it is "as arrived"  it needs an engine rebuild and some rust repairs, but otherwise its not too bad;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_08641.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on October 27, 2016, 06:02:06 pm
I'll be taking a "Tiki tour" of the South Island with my '57 DKW 3=6 during November (complete with wife and kids!).  We are well-versed in each others ways though - over the last 15 years we toured vast swathes of Southern Africa with it;

5 November: Onewhero to Taupo
6 November: Taupo -Wellington - Picton
7 November: Picton -Nelson
8 November: Nelson
9 November: Nelson -Greymouth
10 November: Greymouth - Franz Josef Glacier
11 November: Franz Josef - Wanaka- Queenstown
12 November: Queenstown
13 November : Queenstown - Oamaru
14 November: Oamaru - Christchurch
15 November: Christchurch
16 November: Christchurch - Kaikoura - Blenheim - Picton
17 November: Picton - Wellington
18 November: Wellington
19 November: Wellington - Taupo
20 November: Taupo - Onewhero

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/036_36_1.jpg)

For those of you who see the car along the way - it has an interesting story - here it is (it's rather a long story - so bear with me, I'll present it in two parts.  I've also used the photographs as sparingly as possible - I have LOADS of them for this car);

Story of this 1957 DKW “Big”3=6 F93 Sonderklasse

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/987d9111dac66ed7bb10dc45ae6e05e1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/dkw_36_f93_006.jpg)

Date delivered          -           6 May 1957 (ordered 1955)
Built by -                             Auto Union Gmbh, Dusseldorf, West Germany
Sold new (dealer) -               Bos Motors, Pretoria, South Africa (delivered at the factory in  Dusseldorf)
First registered in -               Dusseldorf, West Germany
Original Colour-                    Sandgelb (AU252)
Interior Original Colour-       Brown cloth/Beige kunstleder.

(The story below was related to me by Mr Bower and his daughter Dorothy in November 2010, at their home in Pretoria, South Africa, where, at 101 years of age, Mr Bower was in amazingly fit and healthy condition, relating the tale, “as if it were yesterday” with great clarity and detail. Mr Bower passed away suddenly three months later in February 2011, a few days short of his birthday, at the Masonic Haven For The Aged in Pretoria)

This car was ordered in 1955 by its first owner Thomas (Tom) Bower from Jacob Bos at Bos Motors, a DKW agent, in Pretoria, South Africa.  Mr Bower had been very impressed (as were a great many other people) by the 1955 model DKW’s (F91) then being demonstrated and sold at Bos Motors.  The car was to be an export specification  “spezial” DKW F93 (the next latest model, due for release as the 1956 model), to be collected at the Auto Union DKW factory in Dusseldorf in 1957 (there was a two year waiting list for DKW’s in those days).  Mr Bower was very specific, that this car should be in colour code AU252 (Sandgelb), a colour he liked very much at the time and considered practical.

Since he had left the Army in 1946, he and his wife, Laura, had been saving to take a long European holiday – Mr Bower had long wished to show his family some of the places he had been to during World War II and to visit some family in the UK. Mr Bower had been a plumber before the War,  after his marriage to his wife Laura in April 1937, and birth of Dorothy in 1938, joined the military in September 1939, where he served as an engineer and eventually as a “Sapper”.

 After the War, he worked at the Pretoria Municipality until his retirement in 1966 – where both he and the DKW were well known and remembered.

In February 1957 the Bowers received notice from Mr Bos by telegram that their car would be ready for collection on Friday 3 May 1957. Thus, Mr Tom Bower, his wife Laura and their daughter Dorothy (who had just finished school at the end of 1956) sailed to Europe to collect their car (flying long distance was yet to become a routine activity).

They duly arrived at the Auto Union factory (this was an old armaments factory, the Rhienmetall-Borsig factory) at exactly eight o’clock on the Friday morning , with all their baggage, ready to collect their new car. Mr Bower, a keen amateur photographer, had his camera at the ready.

  After a short formality, the new car was driven out.  However, the car was green!  Mr Bower was most upset, and demanded his yellow car, producing a copy of the order from Bos Motors…. Herr Schultz from the Auto Union Export Office was summoned…   The rather cross Mr Bower was then told, by the affable and portly Herr Schultz, that his request would be honoured – he would, however, have to wait until Monday, 6 May, to receive his yellow car.  Apparently, the cars were painted in colour batches per day, and thus the “Sandgelb” batch would only be ready on the Monday morning.  Thus placated, Mr Bower and his family retired to the Hotel Berger in Dusseldorf for the weekend.

The family then arrived back at the factory on Monday morning 6 May 1957, again at eight o’clock sharp (this time taking the precaution not to cancel their room at the Hotel Berger!) with suitcases and cameras.  As they arrived, the yard was filled with Sandgelb DKW’s of various models – Mr Bower took a snap of the cars awaiting delivery;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0002.jpg)
 
 In short order, with much apology owing to the delay, their yellow car was handed over to them. Herr Schultz was kind enough to snap a photograph of the family at the gates of the factory, before handing Mr Bower his camera back.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/bscan0022.jpg)

  Then Mr Bower took the car, showing on the odometer, a delivery mileage of 7 miles over to the nearby pumps for a tank of Petroil (a full tank of fuel apparently not being part of the purchase price – only 5 litres were in the tank when sold!), before departing on their trip of Europe in earnest.  The car’s logbook records this 44 ½ litres of Petroil as having cost 30 Deutsche Marks and 70 Pfennig.
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/ascan0017.jpg)

They spent the night of the 6th May 1957 again at the Hotel Berger, where they met another South African family, the Van Wyks’ who had also purchased an “Export” F93, in dark red, which was also taken to South Africa (there is a photograph of the two cars together outside the Hotel Berger with this article).  It was here, in Dusseldorf, that Mrs Bower put the first sticker on the dashboard – and today that collection remains preserved.
 
 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Image0017.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2014-08-05%2009.50.01.jpg)

Next morning, they set course for Mainz, in the Rhineland, a distance of 230 miles away – passing Frankfurt (where the car received its 300 mile service on the 10th of May)  Cologne, Bonn – these cities still showing scars from the War only 12 years earlier.  Here, they explored for a day or so, before driving on to Triberg in the Black Forest and exploring the Black Forest thoroughly, continuing on over the next couple of days through Southern Germany, into Bavaria. A beautiful photograph was taken in the Black Forest at the “Stag’s Leap” ( German : Schwarzwälder Hirschsprung), with the DKW in foreground and the famous stag statue erected in 1907, in the background).

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Image0021.jpg)

 At Garmisch-Partenkirchen, the small Bavarian resort town, they paused for a short while to refuel the car. Here, Mr Bower calculated that the 930 miles of the tour of Germany, thus far had seen the little yellow DKW use 174.5 litres of fuel – in total costing DM123.60.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/0cpgarmisch.jpg)
 
 From there they made their way to Bad Ischl in Austria, pausing to see along the way (from a distance, as it was not accessible to the public in 1957), Hitler’s retreat at Berchtesgaden.

Crossing into Austria, they made their way to the Grossglockner and Franz-Josefs Hohe.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0009_1.jpg[img][img]http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0007.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0011.jpg)

That night they stayed the Hotel Schlosswirt near Großkirchheim in Austria.  The hotel had just been constructed and construction was completed only a few weeks before.  The hotel still exists in its original  form: http://www.schlosswirt.net/  ;
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0008.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0003.jpg)

They continued through Salzburg (where fellow South African, famous opera singer, Mimi Coertse was performing as “Belmonte” in Mozart’s “The Abduction from the Seraglio” – which she had sung since September 1956) to Mariazell in the North Styrian Alps – visiting  a Lime Wood carving of the Virgin Mary, reputed to produce miracles.  The Alpine driving no doubt accelerated the little car’s fuel consumption somewhat, as only 120 miles after taking on 20 litres of Petroil in Mariazell, the car needed another 20 litres – this being taken on in Vienna.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Image0018.jpg)
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2014-08-05%2009.49.29.jpg)

 After some days in the beautiful Capital of Austria they drove another 200 miles to Klagenfurt, where the car received its 1500 mile service at “Dolf Wurm” in Klagenfurt – no adjustments or replacements were made.

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2014-08-05%2009.48.52.jpg)

From Klagenfurt, the car’s nose swung towards the Adriatic Sea and the Bower family headed for Bologna in Italy via the ancient city of Venice from there, the headed still further South to Castiglione dei Pepoli.

 Here, at Castiglione dei Pepoli, the Bower family paused – Mr Bower had been involved in action here during the War, and took the time to visit some his fallen comrades at their graves;

Castiglione South African Cemetery was started in November 1944 by the 6th South African Armoured Division, which had entered Castiglione at the end of September and remained in the neighbourhood until the following April.

Many of the burials were made direct from the battlefields of the Apennines, where during that winter South African troops held positions some 8 kilometres north of Castiglione.

The majority of those buried in this cemetery were South Africans, the remainder belonging mostly to the 24th Guards Brigade, which was under command of the 6th South African Armoured Division.

In the cemetery there is a memorial building originally erected by South African troops, which contains two tablets unveiled by Field-Marshal Smuts; they bear the inscription in English and Afrikaans:

TO SAVE MANKIND YOURSELVES YOU SCORNED
OM DIE MENSDOM TE DIEN HET JUL VEILIGHEID VERSMAAI

The cemetery contains 502 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

(Unfortunately the slides of the Bower’s visit to the cemetery have become very faded by age – there is a slide of the yellow DKW in the gate of the cemetery.  I have included a recent photo of the memorial building, also, below)
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0021.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Castiglione_1.jpg)


  From there they made their way to the ancient city of Rome (driving out a full 40 litres of fuel exploring Rome!).  A visit to the leaning tower of Pisa was made and then onward to Ventimiglia in Northern Italy, via Livorno on the Ligurian Sea (in Italian Tuscany). This photograph was taken near Ventimiglia;
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0001.jpg)

 From Ventimiglia, the Bowers visited Monaco – and the sight of Juan Manuel Fangio’s greatest-ever victories – on 19 May 1957, Fangio won the 1957 Monaco Grand Prix – with greats Stirling Moss and Mike Hawthorne crashing out…

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0019.jpg)

From Monaco (famously called ‘a sunny place for shady people’ by writer W. Somerset-Maugham) the little DKW 3=6  drove on, up to Gap, Hautes-Alpes, France’s highest Prefecture, and from there further up into the Alps to Chambéry, en-route to Martigny in the canton of Valais in Switzerland, on the eastern edge of the Rhone Valley.

 They crossed the famous Furka Pass (later, in 1964 to feature in the James Bond film Goldfinger in a chase scene with a Ford Mustang and a Aston Martin DB5). The Furka Pass, with an elevation of 2,429 metres (7,969 ft), is a high mountain pass in the Swiss Alps connecting Gletsch with Realp. The Bowers visited the Rhône Glacier (German: “Rhonegletscher”), which is a glacier in the Swiss Alps and the source of the river Rhône and one of the primary contributors to Lake Geneva in the far eastern end of the Swiss canton of Valais.

 Mrs Bower affixed a decal bought from a souvenir seller, to the dashboard of the Deek;
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/2014-08-05%2009.50.25.jpg)

 Still further on into Switzerland , at Andermatt– the Bowers took another 20 litres of Petroil on board, 3420 miles showing on the DKW’s odometer.  At Andermatt they took some lunch at this roadside café;

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0025.jpg)

From Andermatt the car made the 160 mile journey to Interlaken, on the shores Lake Brienz – where they refuelled and spent three days exploring and accumulating another 200 miles of driving. The town of Interlaken is located on the Bödeli, between Lake Thun and Lake Brienz, and alongside the Aare river that flows between the two lakes.  This beautiful photograph was taken there, on  the shores of Lake Brienz;

 (http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0015.jpg)

Here is the car on the famous "Old Axenstrasse" - Upon completion in 1865, the Axenstrasse was the first way to get to Uri that did not involve navigating Lake Lucerne. The route between the Axen Mountain and Flüelen existed in 1776 as the Landstrasse (country road). Construction on a new road to connect Flüelen to Brunnen began in 1861, and was completed in 1865. It was named the Axenstrasse because the road is located along the Axen Mountain.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0020.jpg)

From here, they drove across the famous Brünig Pass (3307 ft altitude) (the car seen here at the highest point) – note the accumulated snow on the front bumper;
 
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Image0022.jpg)

Now the Bower family turned northwest and headed to Paris.   Paris in the summer of ’57 was evidently a great place to be, from what I’ve been told. Mrs Bower affixed a beautiful “Paris” decal to the car’s dashboard (still there).  Mr Bower recounted the story of how they became terribly confused trying get around the Arc de Triomphe and ended up going around and around (and around) and eventually managed to get out. Here the little car drank 30 litres of Petroil and then headed for Boulougne-sur-Mer and the Channel Ferry, where it drove aboard the good ship SS Twickenham Ferry (which had been a minesweeper in WWII).

The SS Twickenham deposited the car at Dover, where the Bowers made the 50 mile or so journey to Chatham.  I understood from Mr. Bower that this journey had been made to collect “Granny” (I’m not sure if this was Mr or Mrs Bower’s mother), who then toured in the little Deek with them.

From Chatham, they drove to Solihull, Coventry and then, after a 4500 mile service at Ken Jervis Ltd in Hanley at Stoke-on-Trent, on to Wales – where they refuelled en-route at Hanmer and Chester and spent the night at Llandudno, where this photo was taken of the Deek on the “Promenade”  at Llandudno– the “Grand Hotel” is visible in the distance – I believe this photograph was taken by Dorothy’s “Box Brownie”, as Mr. Bower was unloading the car at the time;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Image0020.jpg) 

They, then backtracked a bit and drove the 148 miles to Windermere in Cumbria, where with 5103 miles showing on the odometer, the car drank 5 imperial gallons of fuel with a pint of oil.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0018.jpg)
 
Mrs Bower, taken with the car, near Newton Abbott in Devon, September 1957

---------------------------------------------END OF PART 1-----------------------------------------------------------------


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: RobClubley on November 11, 2016, 10:50:43 am
http://www.classicandperformancecar.com/dkw/5473/the-cuban-audis-heading-to-havana-in-search-of-auto-union-and-dkw-two-strokes
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 08, 2016, 05:14:38 pm
Thanks Rob!  Very interesting link indeed!

Now - I may have to come back to you with part II of my yellow car's history.  Instead - we spent all of November touring the South Island in it. Our 3700 km (2200 odd miles) trip in our little 1957 DKW has now come to an end. The car is dusty, covered in dead insects, and now resting quietly in its garage - but has faultlessly carried us over mountains (we've now done all the highest roads in New Zealand in it) through valleys, over rivers, through cities and survived an earthquake (well, not really,we didn't feel it in Oamaru) without complaint! We've had a lovely family holiday - the kids and adults alike have had a ball. Even managed to catch two minor milestones on film - 190 000 miles and 191 000 miles! We've met and visited so many friends along the way.  I'll share some photographs here with you;

Firstly the obligatory stop at Taupo for a photo with DC-3 ZK-CAW (sorry about my finger over the lense!)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14947725_10153857181822443_1466949024275041655_n.jpg)

Then a quick stop to snap a photo with DC-3 ZK-APK at Mangaweka - sorry about the quality!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14915605_10153858859227443_7850929679389397761_n.jpg)

Straight to the ferry in wet Wellington!
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14938302_10153859472792443_9181395744351547531_n.jpg)

A visit to the Argosy at Blenheim
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14900482_10153862167892443_4401760561116132782_n.jpg)

Said "hello" to Graham Wiblin who has this four door (file photo - apologies);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/GrahamWiblinDeek.jpg)

A visit to Michael De Vigne in Nelson - he has a 1958 1000 Coupe (maroon), 1960 1000S Coupe (orange) and a 1962 1000S four door (white);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_5466%201_2.jpg)

A visit to see progress on Frank Davidson's beautiful restoration on his 1960 1000S four door at Mapua;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09211.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09221.jpg)

Then - a trip to visit EG595 at WOW (World of Wearable Arts);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09181.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09151.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09141.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09121.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09111.jpg)

Then a "landmark" - 190 000 miles!;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15085673_10153898323257443_5393139802295259228_n.jpg)

Stopped for lunch a very, very wet Westport;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14963335_10153867292232443_7375218285449915332_n.jpg)

A beer at the Punakaiki Tavern!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14938349_10153878830336447_8033442773548506832_n.jpg)

Approach into Greymouth;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15036380_10153878829661447_7916182630570200058_n.jpg)

Packing the car at the Motel in Greymouth - how did I fit everything for the car  (12 litres of two stroke oil, snow chains, water, a few tools and a few parts), two adults, two kids for two weeks (baby's pram, porta-cot etc..) and parts for DKW owners all over the South Island in??? Easy - here it is!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14955962_10153869467512443_2864542852109079653_n.jpg)

At Franz Josef - this car is the only car in the world, to my knowledge that has visited BOTH Franz Josef's in the world (The other is in Austria, which the same car visited in 1957);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15109400_10153898323972443_8382740755936103782_n.jpg)

OK - here is the 1957 visit to the "other" Franz Josef;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/scan0009_2.jpg)

Lovely West Coast Roads;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15110886_10153898323152443_8565589914626749593_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15167631_10153898324487443_8056252680777750235_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10011.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14915291_10153878828821447_2502740541037713543_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09921.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_09952.jpg)

A visit to the National Transport and Toy Museum in Wanaka to catch up on some more DKW's - a 1960 Auto Union 1000S four door (evidently once owned by an NAC employee), and a 1965 DKW F102;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14938320_10153872473667443_5611188106459202651_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka10.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka9.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka8.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka5.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka6.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka7.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka4.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka3.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Wanaka11.jpg)

Then - something to test all of the DKW's 900cc and drum brakes - the summit of the Crown range, near Queenstown!

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15027856_10153872933787443_5894988255104121211_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15134815_10153898325502443_4939329921737410713_n.jpg)

Beautiful Oamaru!
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15056322_10153898325632443_3860160747215949832_n.jpg)

Stopped at Timaru briefly;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15111127_10153898325772443_818629177446423515_o.jpg)

In Christchurch I found out that the 1000S four door previously at Yaldhurst was in fact the black car at Wanaka.  I also visited Warren Burge who enjoys this absolutely beautiful 1962 Auto Union 1000S four door (he will be changing the personalised plate which came with the car from its previous owner);

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15085513_10153897343397443_6096778429010833576_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15078876_10153897343507443_5456751107229295404_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15181529_10153897343477443_8633581773744323810_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/14991900_10153897343442443_5771250092293701011_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15078623_10153897343432443_6224483095144881039_n.jpg)

Waiting in line for the ferry at Picton (Did the 600km from Christchurch in one hit (via Murchison)) ;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15170782_10153892991897443_2289403486608700061_n.jpg)

In Wellington I met up with a friend - who took these photos on the foreshore in Petone;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15078852_1332770463413932_5361217750777009633_n.jpg)

(I don't pose for photos often - but here I am with the car in Wellington)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15056220_1332770003413978_2152049085799798753_n.jpg)

Afterwards we went to Southward Museum, where I had pre-arranged to photograph the 1960 Auto Union 1000S Coupe (with optional Saxomat) on display there.  They kindly obliged and allowed me behind the ropes;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10971.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10981.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10991.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10961.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10871.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_10901.jpg)

Cruising home through Waikato;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15122974_10153898328992443_5920685667888069938_o.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: brian on December 08, 2016, 09:19:09 pm
Nice tour and some great pics
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: D,arcy on December 16, 2016, 05:18:57 pm
Great photos,some very nice cars there too. Pleased to see that you bypassed the earthquake area ok.

 D,arcy
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: Lee on December 16, 2016, 07:29:41 pm
Good write up ..enjoyed all 16 pages  .thanks

Just as a matter of idle curiosity ...can you still buy the 3 cylinder engine parts?
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 17, 2016, 12:06:51 pm
Lee, you sure can - can even get new cranks from Brazil;

http://www.dekabras.com.br/ver-produto.php?produto=64

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2016, 11:08:20 am
The 1956 Monte Carlo Rally Part 1

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo56_1.jpg)

The DKW F91 of M.Grosgogeat/P.Biagini - they won their class and came third overall

There is a delightful film here of this race: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFQHeiEn1tM

A DKW appears at 11 minutes in with the commentary "The two-stroke German DKW, is a force to be reckoned with in International Rallies".

Here is the period account from Motorsport magazine


                                         ----------------------------------------------------
Motorsport Magazine, February 1956
THE 26th MONTE CARLO RALLY


"Mastery of Man Over Machine Gains Jaguar Victory

MONTE CARLO, January 21st.

THIS year's Monte Carlo Rally could be divided into three separate events; the first consisted of a long and tiring drive about Europe which was easy and within the capabilities of the rawest amateur Rally driver, the second involved a steady run from Paris to Monte Carlo, during which the conditions and schedules got increasingly more difficult and in which the driver and timekeeper had to keep in constant touch, and the third and final part was a free-for-all " Targa Florio " over a 150-mile mountain route, in which driver and car had to give all they had.

All told 351 cars were prepared to leave the various controls spread about Europe and follow set routes which converged at Reims and then followed the same route to Paris, where the reliability and road section of the Rally, which was fairly simple, terminated. For most of the competitors the imposed schedules were easily maintained, there being ample time for quick meals, brief sleeps, pauses by the wayside, and, for a rather alarming proportion of the British cars, time to make repairs, fit replacements, and generally bodge-up the accessories. There were numerous makes, such as Austin, M.G., Ford, A.G. and Standard, which suffered unnecessary troubles with electrical components, batteries, shock absorbers, wheels, brakes and so on; typical sufferers being Mrs. Mitchell, whose " works" M.G. was so laden with extra lamps, heaters, de-frosters, horns, etc., that the dynamo could not cope and the battery went flat, while a rear axle oil-seal failed and the bonnet would not shut; the Easton/Garnier A.C. Aceca which threw its suspension away, consumed shockers, swallowed its overdrive and destroyed its wipers; and the Grant/Davis M.G. Magnette, a " works" car with alloy body and tuned engine, which ruined its dynamo and flattened its battery. So the complaints went on, but fortunately the time allowed to reach controls before Paris was ample and most of the sufferers were able to visit the various agents and have the cars rebuilt, and all this in less than 2,000 miles !

The starters from Stockholm, travelling south via Denmark, Germany, Holland and Luxembourg, probably had the most interesting " tour," for most of the way across Sweden was on snow-covered roads, which while not being difficult was interesting. Cars from the east of Europe, from Athens, Munich and Rome, were joined by the group from Paris who were making a round tour back to their starting point. All had to concentrate a bit on the ice-covered autobahns in Germany, while from far away Lisbon there was much rain encountered and the accent was on water in large quantities.

The run from Glasgow was probably the simplest of the lot, the only difficulty being fatigue from continual motoring, but this, of course, applied to all the routes. Arriving in Paris competitors were then given the average speeds they were required to maintain on the remaining 600 miles down to Monte Carlo, by way of the Maritime Alps, so that the navigator/timekeeper had to get busy with calculating machines. The first stage of this part of the trip was fairly easy, the time allowance to Chambery being within the capabilities of all the " Sunday dodderers." On this final 600 miles there were no breaks in the journey, it being accomplished non-stop apart from signing-in at controls. From Chambery to Grenoble things became more difficult for the road went over a very narrow mountain pass during the hours of darkness and to add to the hazards there was some fog. This section Was by no means impossible, for 58 competitors kept to time and lost no marks, but the slightest easing off of concentration, especially with the lower-powered cars, meant dropping behind schedule with subsequent loss of marks. It was this section of the whole road part of the Rally that sorted the competitors out, a large proportion of the entry losing marks, and 30 lost the maximum of 1,900 on this run. Immediately following came another mountain run from Grenoble to Die, not so difficult providing the driver kept at it, and then in the early hours of the morning as dawn broke there came a fairly easy Section from Die to Var, where most of the competitors arrived in bright sunshine.

All this was taking place on the fourth day on the road, after missing three nights in bed, and though the driving was not difficult, most of the crews were feeling very tired and longing for a good wash and a proper meal. With Monte Carlo now almost in sight there began a short sharp tricky part of the Col du Rochette, a narrow winding mountain pass on which the schedule called for flat-out driving from all drivers, no matter what type of car was being used. This 45-kilometre winding road brought competitors to the top of the Mont des Mules hill that descends into Monaco and here they had a braking test. On the timed sections since leaving Paris the average speeds were varied for the class of car, divided into two groups, standard and non-standard touring cars, with four different capacity classes, and it was pretty obvious that it did not pay to be running a gran turismo car or a hotted-up normal saloon, especially if you were baulked on the final section, which was very narrow. The system of giving drivers their average speeds was to quote the number of seconds allowed per kilometre, the total for each section being known. Naturally when climbing the mountainside there was a tendency to take longer than the permitted time per kilometre, especially if held up by a slower car, and this meant that the navigator had to do sonic quick sums to find the increase over the set time when descending the other side.

To conclude the road-section a time was taken for a downhill rush through two hairpin bends, over a distance of approximately 1,000 metres and stopping between two lines. Failure to stop or crossing of the second line involved a large penalty. A quiet trickle through the streets of Monte Carlo took the competitors down onto the harbour front, where every part of the car was checked over and marks lost for anything not working, or damaged, after which the ears were put in a closed park. By Thursday evening all the finishers were in and they numbered 233 out of the original 351. The missing number was made up by 42 failing to start, 71 retiring for various reasons, ranging from mechanical breakdown, through accidents, to sheer tiredness, and 5 were disqualified for infringement of regulations. Taken as a whole the first two parts of the 1956 Monte Carlo Rally could not be considered difficult, especially for a reasonable driver with any semblance of a good motor car. Anyone who had found the opening stage to Paris difficult must have been a terrible driver or else had a pathetic motor car, while the tuned section from Paris to Monte Carlo was only a dice for those with unsuitable cars, either large and gormless, under-powered, badly geared or badly prepared.

During Friday, the results of the foregoing were analysed and the best 90 were moved from the original closed park to another one, all the remaining competitors being allowed to collect their cars. The select 90 stayed in the park for another night, preparatory to tackling a rather super special-test on Saturday. * * *

A good selection of British cars left Glasgow, there being 21 Fords,. 10 Standards, eight Jaguars, seven M.G.s, six Austins, five Sunbeams, three each of Bristols and Rileys, two Vauxhalls and one each of Humber, Allard, Daimler, Rover, Jowett, Aston Martin and Wolseley. The works-entered and sponsored ears were well equipped with all the latest aids to navigation and comfort for on and off-duty occupants, and a number of new fittings were noticed in some of the privately-entered team ears. To take the works cars first, it was noticed that the Fords were fitted with darkened facia panels, reclining seats and hooded headlamps for use in fog; other Fords had average-speed indicators and bonnet louvres to deflect warm -engine air on to the screen. The Sunbeams were fitted with a device called a Halda speed pilot, which is a Swedish-made instrument consisting of a normal kilometres-per-hour instrument with a pointer for setting to the required speed and to the right of it a clock with a similar pointer which is set when the car moves; all that is then required is to see that both needles coincide for the average speed to be maintained. Austins are likewise well equipped with compasses, map-reading lights, stop-watches and additional windscreen defrosters.

An especially well-equipped M.G. Magnette of Mr. E. Lambert, later to be involved in a collision with a lorry, was a joy to see, being fitted with almost every conceivable type of gadget, such as a power assisted passenger seat, electric razor, wash-basin, eine camera, marine-type revolving headlamp-glass wipers, and other more normal pieces of paraphernalia, demonstrating some of the time that is taken by some of the non-works-entered vehicle owners to beat their opponents at their own game.

The route for Glasgow entries goes by Stranraer to Carlisle and then down central England to Barnby Moor, where lay the first control, then on to London, where a police escort took them through the City, and finally the last British control at Dover loomed up and there was a brief respite as papers were checked and cars loaded on to the British Railways steamer The Lord Warden for transit to Boulogne early on Tuesday morning.

At Dover, on this mild winter night, the Glasgow participants began to draw in after 9 o'clock on the Monday to embark on the special boat which left at about L30 a.m. for Boulogne. Of the seventy-three starters due in at this check point two were missing. They were Dr. A. D. Mitchell, in a Wolseley, who was unfortunate enough to collide with a bus very soon after leaving the start, a sad beginning to such an adventure; the other, Reg Harris, the Wen-known sprint cyclist, reached Stranraer early but was delayed due to adjustments having to be made to the brakes of his Jaguar. He later retired from the Rally. Accompanying the competing cars on the boat were two A.E.C. coaches, one (the " Pyjama Express ") detailed to carry baggage, and the other (the " Wives' Special") taking wives and friends of the competitors to Monte Carlo. Both were scheduled to arrive at the finish the day before the Rally entrants reached the Mediterranean. * * *

On the way down to Monte Carlo from England we made contact with the route at various points and finally followed it in detail from Die to the finish. At the Reims control, where all the routes were converging before heading for Paris, everything was well organised by the A.C. de Champagne, the club being very -happy, having just had its permanent circuit at Gueux passed as safe and ready for motor racing by the French commission that is inspecting circuits for this year's racing. The control, where competitors had to get their road books stamped, was immediately outside the headquarters of the club, with space on the wide pavements roped off for parking the cars, each starting point having its own section of pavement. There was a brief respite here for those who were on time, and a champagne lunch had been laid on by the club. Preferring motoring we headed east towards Metz and Strasbourg, the first signs of the approaching competitors being the two baby Renaults of Condrillier and Mlle. Thirion running in close formation, followed later by Gatsonides with his Phase III Vanguard. In ones, twos, threes and even fours, the long stream of cars swept past on their way to Paris, all appearing to have plenty of time in hand, taking villages at the regulation speed limit and barely showing signs of tyre scrub on hairpins out in the country. After motoring through the night we joined the Paris-to-Monte Carlo route down in the Maritime Alps and drove over some of the mountains in fog that kept us down to 35 m.p.h., heading for Digne. Over more hills the morning sun appeared for the first time for Many days and we paused on a fast downhill section and drew off the road. Here there was more urgency in the way the cars were going and most of them were pressing on, but none so furiously as the Redex service van, which we later met towing a Zephyr that had slid off the road and damaged its clutch housing and front-end. The warm sunshine and damp roads, slippery -in many shaded parts, were keeping the drivers busy, but most passengers and navigators seemed to have time to sleep, Ground's co-driver in his Mark VII Jaguar being " out-to-the-world " in his special front seat. On the winding road down to the control at Var, Nutall's XK140 coupe was all for hurrying, but was held up badly by a Jaguar Mark VII driver who was so tired he forgot to drive on the right-hand side of the road. Allard in his blue saloon, Lord Avebury (Jaguar) and Davis (Sunbeam) were all hurrying along without fuss and Mrs. Ashfield and Mrs. Clark in their Phase III Vanguard were driving very prettily. The control at Var-was on a long straight road where competitors could see it and had plenty of time to stop before it and wait until they were on time. Without any pause the ears had to leave the main road and tackle the winding climb over the Col du Rochette which developed into a speed hill-climb. Observing on a hairpin, with a view of more than a mile of the approaching road, Lespiat (Salmson), Shillabeer (Humber), Wharton (Austin), Dugat (Dyna-Panhard), Lumme (Skoda), Von Zedlitz (Mercedes-Benz), Verzijl (Fiat 1,100), Gerdum (Mercedes-Benz) and Masson (Panhard)all treated this winding road with contempt and hurled their cars round the bends with screaming tyres. Kvarnstrom in a gigantic American Ford V8, Wollert (VW) and Nysten (D.K.W.) were outstandingly neat, whereas Kenyon (Zephyr) hadn't a clue, Lindgvist (Opel) only just got round and Prydz found his Borgward a bit of a handful but cleared the rock outcrop. Reece's Anglia, which lie found much to his liking for this sort of work, was baulked by a VW and much hooting told of similar predicaments lower down the hill. Baxter had a spirited dice in the 13.13.C. " works " Austin Westminster, which had a special four-speed gearbox with " real " gearlever and two-carburetter engine, his intrepid passengers wearing crush-hats; we noticed crash-hats carried in other ears, witness of the sort of road race that the final regularity test was to he. Some speculation was caused by the fabric hood of Hocquard's Panhard Junior in a Rally closed to sports cars.

Leaving this " speed " still in progress we were able to reach La Turbie before the finish of the downhill braking test. Here the Skoda drivers changed down to assist their brakes, engines revving furiously. Baxter put up a fine show. but Birkett (M.G. Magnette) braked too early and lost many marks, Grantham's Zodiac struck sparks from its Wyresoles, while Vilreon (Porsche) put up a splendid performance, stopping effortlessly from a high speed. This car made best time (41 sec.), the runners-up being Adams (Jaguar) and Becker's Mercedes-Benz (both 42.3 see.), Dobler's Porsche (42.4 sec.), Persson's Porsche (43 sec.) and I,eston's Aston Martin DB 2/4 and Nutall's Jaguar (both with 43.2 sec.). It is significant that after their long and in later stages arduous drive, only one car—Brady's Simea—failed this test completely, although Wagberg's D.K.W. looked pretty brakeless (64 sec.) and Ingices Skoda scored all-time-low (11 mm. 32 sec.) in an exercise completed by the majority in under 50 sec. Brooke created a diversion when his Standard Ten arrived at, the start of the test motoring on three wheels and a brake drum; it had broken another wheel earlier on. This test concluded the road section, particularly for one of last year's winners, Gunnar Fadum driving his Sunbeam, for his clutch disintegrated and the car had to be pushed in. Down on the Harbour front the .scrutineering was under way. Many cars already showed evidence of contact with hard objects, particularly Wagberg's D.K.W., and the Allard was an ocld shape where the " alligator hood" had yawned while the car was in motion. Nevertheless, marks lest were quite moderate, from 100 in the case of a Riley without a spare wheel to lesser penalties for damaged or defective lamps, Gibson's Austin losing 30 because it had no " audible warning of approach." The cars having been locked away for the night many of the crews were car-less and obliged to walk, take a taxi or cadge lifts to their hotels, or remain to •drown their fatigue in the B.M.C.R.C.C. coach full of Haig Whisky. * *

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo565.jpg)
The 1955 DKW F91 of Madame Helen Spiliotakis takes a left hander

It can truly be said that the competitors who accomplished the first two parts of the Rally with a sufficiently small loss of marks to get in the first 90 in the general classification were compensated for the tedium of driving for four days and three nights, for on the Saturday morning they set off on a 150-mile regularity-test over second-class mountain roads which proved to be a nine-tenths dice over the whole distance, and was nothing more than a very thinly disguised motor race.

After leaving the ears in the closed park overnight each crew had to present itself on the starting line at a given time and leaving at intervals they set off on the test of regularity around a set course through the mountains behind Monte Carlo. The results of the first two parts of the Rally had given first place to Adams, Bigger and Johnstone with a Mark VII Jaguar, followed by Schock and Mcill with a 220 Mercedes-Benz and Grosgogeat and Biagini with a D.K.W. It was noticeable that a large proportion of the successful 90 competitors had started front Stockholm, while outstanding among the ears was the fact that five out of the six new Citroen DS 19 models had qualified. Peugeot, Panhard and Simea had done well by sheer weight of numbers in the entry list, but atnongst British cars Ford, Standard and M.G., in spite of large numbers at the start, had only five, one and one, qualified, respectively. Alfa-Romeo were equally poor, with only two cars out of sixteen entries in the final test. A.C. and Bristol both had one car left in. Among the British drivers Adams was ably backed up by Harper/Humphrey (Sunbeam) in fourth place, but then there was a long list of Continentals down to 17th place, taken by Ray/Cutts (Sunbeam). Although there were 24 British teams in the final 90 they were. mostly near the end, but at. least there was the consolation that they had qualified. Among the 24 British were three ladies' teams : Mrs. Mitchell/Miss Hindmarsh/Mrs. Reece (M.G. Magnette), Mrs. Johns/Miss Moss/Miss Riche (Austin Westminster) and Mrs. Cooke/Mrs. Hamilton (Ford Zephyr).

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo563.jpg)
The DKW F91 of M.Grosgogeat/P.Biagini getting unstuck from the snow...



Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2016, 11:09:19 am
(Part 2)

Although the route for this mountain test was known beforehand the average speeds required for the various classes and categories was kept secret until immediately before the start. Taken generally the weather conditions appeared to be pretty fair, but even so it was obvious as soon as the competitors received the time schedules that this-150,mile drive through the mountains was going to be a miniature Mille Miglia. Providing everyone could keep on time at the venoms check points around the course then the classification at the end of the road section would stand, but naturally the possibility of that, happening was pretty remote. It seemed quite impossible for Adams to drive his. large unwieldy Mark VII Jaguar around the narrow mountain roads quick enough to keep up with a D.K.W. for example, while the British women. teams with Austin, M.G. and Ford Zephyr could hardly hope to deal with the 1500-c.c. Porsche, especially as it had a large lead on points to begin with anyway. For some tennis, such as Sidvaderi/Coombs/Young with their Ford Anglia, the position was hopeless, for they had arrived on three cylinders, with no brakes and a second gear that kept jumping out. That they had qualified in the first 90 is all the More credit to them but it was useless for them to attempt the mountain circuit, as once the ears arrived at Monte Carlo no work was allowed to be done on them. Another team in a bad position was Mrs. Melander/Mrs. Lindberg, whose 220 Mercedes-Benz was in a very sorry state, running badly and having negligible brakes. With the fastest ears starting first competitors left Monte Carlo and set oft up into the mountains for some three hours of continual twists and turns, coupled with climbs-to as high as 5,000 feet and returning to sea level.

Watching on the Col du Brous descent, just before a series of tight hairpins followed by some fast downhill bends. That impression of a Targa Florio-cum-Mille Miglia was heightened by the appearance of the first seven competitors, driving 1,900 Alfa--Romeo, Lancia Aurelia G.T., Mercedes-Benz 300 SL, Zagato Alfa-Romeo Sprint, 2.3-litre Salinson, and Lancia G.T.. respectively. all going flat-out downhill just about on the limit. just when it seemed that British ears were going to get left behind Wharton appeared with his " works " Austin Westminster, completely out of control, but going at a terrific! pace and getting round the corners by sheer skill alone; then came Adams doing wonderful things with his Mark VII Jaguat, followed by Burgess dicing on the extreme edge with :mot her Austin Westminster. Not far behind came three more " works " Austin in the order Gott (Westminster), Scott-Brown (MO with M.G. gearbox) and Mrs. Johns (Westminster), the last-named doing great things to keep up With the " mere" men. Unfortunately-a bit farther on the brakes failed on her Austin and she had no alternative but to put the car sideways and hope for the best; it turned over and by a miracle all three women climbed out unhurt. Of the Sunbeam entries Harper and Ray were going great guns; though the latter had to stop momentarily to shut the bonnet, which had sprung open. Mrs. Coialte (Ford) and. Bremner (Riley Pathfinder) had both made very solid contact with rocks and walls, but were eentintting with badly battered motor ears. The Continental drivers were not without their troubles, for a Dyna-Panhard 54 rolled right over, smashing all the glass crushing the roof and buckling a wheel; it was put back the right way up and continued at unabated speed. An American Ford V8. driven by a Swedish team, was delayed by rear axle trouble, and the Belgian girl, Mlle. Thirion, had a puncture in her baby Renault, but. continued after fitting the spare. As was expected among the women drivers, Mine. Blanchoud hardly had to hurry in her Porsche, while Mrs. Mitchell was hurling her M.G. Magnette about furiously in it hopeless endeavour to keep up.

On the far side of the mountain circuit the roads were covered with frozen snow, while on the highest points clouds were down on the roods, reducing visibility to 20 yards just where the course began a sharp descent through numerous hairpin bends. Row the drivers of the large and unwieldy ears managed to hurl them round the blind corners, With rocks on one side and stone parapets on the ether is one of those skilled mysteries of fast motoring that is born in a driver and not developed. Of the 90 cars that had spent two nights in the closed park only 70 returned and many of them were bent and battered almost beyond recognition, while around the circuit others lay derelict, here a Skoda with a rear wheel broken off, there a D.K.W. crushed into a wall, somewhere else a Riley (Bremner's) in a ditch. No one had been hurt, everyone had enjoyed an almighty dice, which after all is the whole purpose of motoring competition, the spectators hind loved every minute of it, and the big factory. representatives were beginning to arrange for the collection of their heaps of wreckage that once were shiny new motor cars. The outcome of this wonderful day of dicing was that most people had managed to retain their positions in the general classification,the British cheered loudly for another Jaguar competition victory (the first in the Monte Carlo Rally), the Irish and the world in general acclaimed the skill of Ronald Adams for the way he handled his car, which had run faultlessly throughout the event, and many drivers had improved their position in the results: Of the 24 British crews who tackled this motor race, 20 arrived at the finish in spite of having unsuitable cars for this type of going, and between them they more than made up for the poor impression made by the majority during the first two parts of this long and varied rally.


(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo561.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12029771_1005475182824363_6615439197441503307_o_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo562.jpg)

Wagberg's damaged DKW -  crew Harry Wagberg, Carl Zaine - rather amazingly, they actually listed amongst the finishers - 90th overall

The final Classification of the, whole Rally was sorted out on marks lost during the three parts of the event, but the system used was somewhat complicated. Some unfortunates, such as Mrs. Johns and Bremner, who both wrote their cars off in an attempt to do the final test, dropped 40 or more places, down to the bottom of the list of 90, while others who were in no position to even start the mountain test in spite of having qualified, lost the same marks and only one or two positions, the bottom of the list being the lowest paint anyway. Due to reasonably good weather and an absence of any serious ice or snow the 26th Monte Carlo Rally turned out to be comparatively easy and success or failure depended on accurate timekeeping during the 600-mile test front Paris to Monte Carlo, aided and abetted by skilful driving during the final Mountain Circuit trial. "


Results;
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Results56%20Monte.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/MonteCarlo564.jpg)

The DKW F91 of M.Grosgogeat/P.Biagini
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on December 29, 2016, 11:49:54 am
From the South African "CAR" magazine (various issues through 1961 and '62 via Rinus van der Berg).  The Muhl Brothers from Rustenburg with their shiny black Auto Union 1000S Coupe "TRB 9" and Sarel van der Merwe with his Auto Union 1000 (with navigator seated in the back seat) and 1000SP wheels, became the stuff of legend;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15390672_1367768789901924_3461915120482864715_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15391200_1367780386567431_7278687849180734224_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15401035_1367769936568476_4821579384345467037_n%201.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15420863_1367770096568460_3516084356743031911_n.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15493571_1367780343234102_8962452707902129969_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/15401130_1367779826567487_7850675753054031749_n.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 04, 2017, 11:40:49 am
The Deek's heart - the roller bearing crankshaft

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/015.jpg)

For the last 65 years the single most talked about Auto Union/DKW component has most certainly been its robust little crankshaft. At 22 kg in weight, its no laughing matter - its short, stubby - and expensive to fix.

Back in 1962/3 it also became the DKW's Kryptonite.  Its inability to live without constant lubrication left it at the mercy of the ham-handed refueller or a malfunctioning Lubrimat. The winter of 1962 was cold - cranks failed en-masse.  Auto Union honoured warranties - but it took months. Auto Union was financially in dire straits.

Given sufficient lubrication (oil:fuel = 1:40) - it was long-lived -it would do up to 110 000 miles easily and reliably.  The first sign of problems would usually come in the form of an ominous rumble from the bowels of the motor.  This would progress to a constant "Shhhhhh" sound - eventually the crank would have to be replaced.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/may%2019%20083-emCopying_1.jpg)

After 1964, supplies of good cranks and then later new bearings and conrods slowly just about dried up.  Many alternative solutions for main bearings were dreamt up...spacers, rings, silicone goop, you name it.  None of it lasted the distance. In the internetless world of the 1970's and '80's DKW's died one after another - few people could access spare parts once the dealerships dried up.  The tell-tale sign always being the nose-high attitude of just about every abandoned Deek - the engine had been removed from its rightful place and dumped in the boot. You still often find them like that.

Today, new bearings and conrods can be bought from Brazil - expensive, but now they can be had.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/84866ff104.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/CIMG3698.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/4136cd1b54.jpg)

I am going try, in the next few months to rescue a few cranks by importing some bearing and con-rod kits into NZ and rebuilding a few cranks myself. Watch this space...

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Splitting%20crank.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 05, 2017, 03:02:02 pm
The 1959 Coupe des Alpes Rally

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/zy01.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/DauphineCdA59.jpg)

(Photographs of the 1959 Coupe des Alpes are not many - car no 89, a 1958 model Auto Union 1000,  Hermann Kühne and Hans Wencher came in an impressive 2nd overall - the winning Renault Dauphine of Clarou-Rambaud is just to the left of the photograph)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/AlpineMap%201_1.jpg)

There is a film of the rally here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxHh5rgKEDM&t=810s

Much was made at the time of the British cars like the Austin Healeys - it is seldomly mentioned today, that they were soundly thrashed by the likes of the humble Renault Dauphine and the Auto Union 1000 on this rally!

Here is a period account written by JAH Gott. The article is voluminous with a grudging single line acknowledgment to the Auto Union DKW!  Memories of the recent war were still fresh.

"Hertfordshire Constabulary

In his quarterly feature, the Motoring Correspondent of THE POLICE
JOURNAL describes the 1959 Alpine Rally and road-tests a Renault
Dauphine-the winning car

The 1959 Alpine Rally

THE TWO INTERNATIONAL RALLIES best known in this country are
the "Monte" and the "Alpine," whose official title is the "Coupe
des Alpes," so called after that most coveted trophy, awarded
only for an unpenalised run. Each is very different in conception,
the one being largely a navigators' event and the other primarily
a drivers' event. The "Monte" is decided by regularity sections,
governed by secret checks, and, in addition, a crew can have a
"lucky dip" amongst the choice of starting-places, whilst the "Alpine"
has the same course for all cars, although the set average speeds
vary according to the size of the car and its type, these speeds being
so calculated that only the best crews and the fastest cars can hold
'them. As the course is published some time beforehand, the manufacturers
normally send a car over the route, and the "works" teams
usually have more than a shrewd idea of the difficulties involved.
This year we in the B.M.C. team had no illusions about the 2,500
mile route which started at Marseilles and finished at Cannes after
traversing some of the most difficult mountain passes in France,
Austria and Italy. Our reconnaissance crew had reported that the
handicap favoured a small car, more particularly a small saloon,
and that, driving flat-out, they had been eight minutes late over a
"key" section in Austria.
As a result, we had put our European Lady Champions, Pat
Moss / Ann Wisdom, into an Austin A.40, with instructions to try
for a Saloon Category win, a Coupe des Alpes and, of course, a
Ladies' Class win, whilst the "mere males," myself and Chris
Tooley, Jack Sears/Peter Gamier and Bill Shepherd/John Williamson,
were on Austin Healey 1()(}-6s, with instructions to try for the
Team Prize, the Sports Category, and our class.
The team travelled out by the French Train Ferry, which is a
delightfully easy way of getting across France. Embarking at
Boulogne at 7 p.m., one wakes up about 12 hours later at Lyons
having done almost three-quarters of the distance to the Cote
d'Azur. With no hotel or petrol bills to meet, this is not much more
expensive than driving down and certainly more pleasant.
On arrival at Marseilles, the cars were carefully checked over
whilst the crews checked over the opposition equally carefully.
The Sports Category contained Alfa Romeos, Aston Martin,
Mercedes, D.B.s. Porsches and Triumphs, all driven by experts, but
the British "works" teams, more particularly the Fords and Sunbeams,
had concentrated upon the Saloon Class.
Chief Superintendent Gatt drove this Austin Healey 100-6 ill the 1959
Alpine Rally, in which he finished 5th in the Grand Touring (Sports)
Category and 2nd in his class. His article in this issue describes his run.
The class opposition to our three Healeys consisted of an Aston
Martin, two Mercedes 300SLs and two Triumphs. The Aston
Martin was driven by Count Charles de Salis, winner of his class
in the "Monte" and "Alpine"; the Triumphs were driven by Annie
Soisbault, the Lady Champion of France, and an old friend and
former team-mate, Bill Bennett, whilst the Mercedes were handled
by Walter Schock, European Rally Champion in 1956, and a charming
American couple, Mr. and Mrs. Mills. This was their first International
Rally and they were under the unfortunate misapprehension
that the "Alpine" was a regularity rally rather than a flat-out
race against the watch.
At 1.30 p.m., 24th June, the Mills led off on the first "leg" of the
rally, which was due to finish at Cortina d'Ampezzo in the Dolomites
some 800 miles and 28 hours later. Running as No.6, Chris and I
had our two team-mates, the other Mercedes and Bill Bennett, in
front of us.
Right from the start the route proved difficult. Down by the sea
it was blazing hot, so hot that the metal of the cars burnt one's
hands; up in the mountains, it was cold and slippery, with sudden
showers of rain. The first real test was a timed climb on the
7,383 foot Col d'Allos. We managed our time, being fastest of the
Healeys, but the Schock Mercedes was faster. On the Col we passed
the American Mercedes, which was most courteously pulled over
to let us through, and not long after the Americans retired, although
they followed the rally round to see how things went. On the climb
to the Italian border at Mt. Genevre, we ran through a violent
thunderstorm, and at 6,500 feet we seemed unpleasantly close to
some of the vicious lightning flashes. This storm followed us all
across Italy, so that when we arrived at Monza Autodrome it was
still raining very hard, which made the test on the track very
frightening (to me at any rate) and rather dangerous.
For this test we had to do three timed laps, of which the fastest
had to be at around an average of 85 m.p.h. to avoid penalty; this
meant that our Healeys were doing around 120 m.p.h. down the
straights which, in the conditions, was most unpleasant. My first
two laps were outside the required time by about a second, but, on
the final lap, screwing up all my courage, I managed to get under
the time by two seconds, much to the relief of Chris and myself.
When the spray had subsided, it worked out that only the Schock
Mercedes and the Healeys of Sears and myself were unpenalised in
the class and so still had the chance of a Coupe des Alpes. On the
run to Cortina, Jack went out on the Passo di Vivione where the
notorious gullies caused the fan to carve through his radiator. So,
on arrival at the Olympic Stadium, the Healeys had no chance of
the team prize and, on paper, the class lay between the Mercedes
and us.
However, in motor sport as in pools forecasting, the "paper
form" doesn't mean very much, for the next day's run through
Austria drastically changed our fortunes. Pulling up at the end of
a very hectic stage, the car was promptly enveloped in a cloud of
steam, but we had no time to do anything except fill it up with
water and tear off to the next timed climb. Here we were held up
for 15 minutes whilst the police cleared the roads, which gave us
the chance to find out that the boiling was due to the radiator tap
having been knocked out of position by a boulder, but not the
chance to repair it as we were forbidden to work on the car whilst
waiting to start the climb. We therefore had to stop on the pass
and refill with water. As it was essential not to hold up cars behind,
we had to go rather a long way before finding a suitable place to
pull off, by which time the temperature needle had not only gone
"off the clock," but twice round it! For the next three hours, until
we found a garage with proper welding equipment, the poor Healey
took an unmerciful beating, being driven until it boiled (usually
within 50 miles), being filled with ice-cold water and then again
being driven flat-out to catch up the minutes so lost. It says a lot
for the stamina of the engine that it never missed a beat during this
shocking maltreatment. Eventually we did find a mechanic, who
brazed a plate across the tap-hole and the leak, so that we were at
least capable of finishing even if the loss of time in repairs had
dropped us from first to last in the class.
However, when we arrived at Merano, we found that Annie
Soisbault had taken over our class lead and that the Aston Martin
had retired with engine trouble and the Mercedes with a split tank.
To compensate, Pat Moss and Ann Wisdom were holding fourth
place in their A.40, and were the only crew to hold the flying
Renault Dauphines which had led from the first.
The third stage of 400 miles across Italy to St. Gervais in French
Savoy was a long tiring drag, not made any less tiring for us by the
fact that we had to start at 4 a.m., which meant getting up at
2.30 a.m. and going without breakfast, as our "Palace" type hotel
flatly refused to serve it at that hour. Amongst many other wellknown
passes, the day's run included the most spectacular climb
in Europe, the 9,000 foot Stelvio, with its 48 hairpins, where there
was thick snow at the summit.
The latter part of the stage was run in a violent rainstorm, which
flooded roads and made diversions necessary; for these no extra
time was allowed, so some hectic driving and accurate navigating
were called for.
With the last and hardest stage of 805 miles, in 28 hours over
27 passes, starting at 6 p.m. on the following day, it was a real
relief to have a proper meal and a good night's sleep.
In the afternoon we could size up the position. Annie Soisbault
had retired, which left only three in our class, now led by Bill
Bennett's Triumph, followed by our Healeys. Bill had a lead of
226 October-December, 1959
1 minute over the Shepherd / Williamson car and 7! minutes over
us, but we knew that the Triumph was in trouble with its exhaust,
which would have to be repaired if it hoped to finish.
On the debit side, the Moss/Wisdom A.40 had retired after a
magnificent run, with gearbox derangements.
As soon as we left the "pare Ierme," we spotted the Triumph
stationary amidst a swarm of mechanics. Bennett had wisely decided
to make his repair when the engine was still cold and where he
could organise mechanics to assist; morever, we found that by hard
driving we could make up some four minutes on the stage. However,
by the time that we left the control, the Triumph had not
pulled in, so that meant the Shepherd/Williamson Healey took over
class lead. For us the burning question was whether the repair
would take long enough to give us second place. When Bill pulled
in, grinning, at the next control, we found that we were still third,
4! minutes behind him.
Nevertheless, a night which included the 8,000 foot Galibier, the
7,000 foot AlIos and Cayolle and the 6,000 foot Glandon, Col de
Fer and Vars, to say nothing of a host of "mere" 4,000 foot passes,
could rapidly alter things. It did-but not to the advantage of the
Healeys!
On the rough Col d'Ornon, well off the beaten track, Chris and I
spotted the ominous splashes in the dust which betoken a car in
dire trouble; then suddenly round a hairpin the car itself, the Healey
class leader, out with a cracked sump and an engine seized through
lack of oil.
Now, of the eight cars which started, only Bennett's Triumph and
our Healey remained. Through the heat of Provence and the clouds
of sticky white dust, over arid Mont Ventoux, we chased the
Triumph, but Bill was driving with his head and though we cut his
lead, he never made the mistake which would allow us to pass him.
How easy this was to do was proved by a Triumph crew in the
class below us. On Mont Ventroux the driver slammed into some
straw bales, breaking his jaw and wrecking his car. Two more cars
broke down within sight of the finish, to the chagrin of their crews
who had nursed them so far. But the Healey and the Triumph ran
on tirelessly. Now we were on the home stretch, and the deep blue
of the Mediterranean could be glimpsed from the pass summits.
For showmanship (and because our Healey was unmarked), we
stopped to wash and polish it, so that it looked as though it had
just come out of a showroom-in marked contrast to some other
cars held together with string and wire.
Then, suddenly, the lights of Cannes and the finish, to an accompaniment
of flash-bulbs, champagne, speeches and congratulations
in three languages.
It had been a bitter struggle, in which the lead in our class had
October-December, 1959 227
changed no less than five times. Only seven out of 23 sports cars
had finished, of which the little French D.B. alone could claim a
Coupe des Alpes; for the others the average had been set too high
and many had blown up or crashed in trying to hold it.
The saloons had been less hardly handicapped, and had done
magnificently, the crews claiming eight Coupes des Alpes. Of these
one had gone to a French Renault Dauphine, decisively winner
of the Rally, another to a German DKW, and the others to British
cars and crews, three to Fords (which also won all possible team
prizes), the others to Sunbeams.
All in all, a genuine international share-out of the spoils
"

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/13266122_1061772037194677_2987786003738986381_n.jpg)

This is the 1958 Auto Union 1000 Coupe de luxe - a car like this came second in the 1959 Coupe des Alpes Rally (Alpine Rally) - an almost forgotten achievement

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 06, 2017, 04:35:43 pm
The turbo-charged DKW Monza

This hot little car with its turbo-charged triple has been a familiar sight at European Auto Union events for some time;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/turbomonzasss.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/turbomonzass.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/turbomonza.jpg)

Sadly it burned out in August this year, and is in the process of being rebuilt;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/turbomonzassss.jpg)

Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 06, 2017, 04:47:12 pm
In the classifieds today - this very surprising find in Wellington!

 None of the DKW "aficionados" in NZ were aware of its existence - it has been stored for a reported 25-30 years.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/544569655.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/544569683.jpg)


It is a 1958/59 1000 Coupe de Luxe - the same model mentioned time and time again for its rally wins in these pages.

Here is the ad (advertised incorrectly as a '57): http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/specialist-cars/other/auction-1236033043.htm

In good health, it should look like this;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/12039725_10153239915532983_5391973449680501412_n.jpg)

I really hope it finds a good home - it should look great once restored!
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on January 31, 2017, 04:02:38 pm
"CAR" Magazine in South Africa recently bought a 1958 DKW 3=6 Coupe to celebrate the magazine's 60th birthday.

Here is a short video and article on the 1700 km journey they made with the little car, before pressing it into fleet service for the next 12 months;

http://www.carmag.co.za/video_post/dkw-tackles-1-700-km-trip-for-cars-60th-birthday/
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 28, 2017, 02:17:09 pm
This May, will mark the 35th anniversary of the death of Auto Union's most famous car model....not a car, but a woman - the one and only Romy Schneider;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Romy_Schneider_mit_DKW_1957%201.jpg)


For her life story, I will quote the German Bilingual Magazine - "GermanWorld";


Myth, Style Icon, Tragic Figure: The Unforgettable Romy Schneider

by Petra Schuermann   


" Even decades after her death, Romy Schneider is still a captivating figure. Her aura, her myth still blaze on as if she never died. She has gone down in film history as a German-French world star, and the Sissi trilogy is not the only reason behind her fame. In France she was transformed from a shy, naïve teenager to the emancipated femme fatale, finding recognition here as a character actress. Her international success and turbulent life full of fateful blows elevated Romy Schneider to the pantheon of German-speaking film stars such as Marlene Dietrich and Hildegard Knef, who also became international sensations. Both in her professional and private life she pushed herself to the limit. Her legend was sealed when she died at the young age of 43. May 29, 2012  marked the 30th anniversary of the death of Romy Schneider.
Born in 1938 in Vienna as the daughter of the actor couple Magda Schneider and Wolf Albach-Retty, little Romy, whose name was Rosemarie Magdalena Albach, grew up with her grandparents in Bavaria. Later she attended a boarding school, and her parents divorced. Early in life she decided she also wanted to become an actress. And early on she received her first role: In the film Wenn der weiße Flieder wieder blüht (When the White Lilacs Bloom Again) the 15-year-old debuted at the side of her mother in 1953. The movie was a big success. In 1955 the shooting began for the historical film Sissi, which tells the story of the early years of the legendary Austrian empress Elisabeth. By this time Romy had starred in five movies, playing leading roles in two of them. She was already a star, but Sissi was to be the role of her life – a blessing and a curse at the same time.

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Romy.jpg)

Although the first of the three Sissi movies brought international fame to Romy Schneider and tremendously boosted her popularity in the German-speaking countries of Europe, she was reluctant to accept the leading role in the sequels. In the end, she acquiesced, but gained acting experience in other movies in the meantime. A fourth Sissi movie she successfully refused. She wanted to get away from the image of the darling teenager and escape the paternalism of her stepfather who acted as her manager. At the end of the 1950s she starred in the movie Christine together with the French actor Alain Delon. They were a couple not only on the screen but also became one in private. Romy turned her back on the German film industry and moved to Paris. The German public held this against her, and the critics berated her, refusing to accept the change in Romy Schneider. In a wild marriage with a Frenchman? Playing annoyingly brazen roles? None of this fit the Sissi image. In France, on the other hand, the journalists adored her. She worked successfully with Luchino Visconti, Orson Wells and Claude Sautet. In Los Angeles she starred in a movie with Jack Lemmon. While she found the professional recognition she had always wanted, her relationship with Alain Delon fell apart. Romy Schneider was devastated. She tried to take her life.
In the 1960s Romy met the director and actor Harry Meyen. They became a couple, and Romy moved to Berlin. Their son David Christopher was born. In 1968 they starred in the movie Der Swimmingpool together with her ex-fiance Alain Delon. The tabloids rejoiced and hoped for a rekindling of former feelings, as the movie with the breathtakingly beautiful Romy Schneider was suffused with eroticism. But a renewed romance failed to materialize. The movie was nonetheless a big hit, both with the critics and the box office.
romy-995771f64_lrIn the 1970s Romy shot films mostly in France – one film after another. She could choose between many offers and continued to play demanding roles: a German Jew on the run (The Train, 1973), a neglected wife who has an affair (Love at the Top, 1974), a rape victim (The Old Gun, 1975). However, she separated from Harry Meyen. A few years later he hanged himself, for which Romy blamed herself. In the early 1980s her marriage with her former private secretary Daniel Biasini also failed, and she started having problems with alcohol and substance abuse. She was quoted as saying: “I am an unhappy 42-year-old woman.” A few months after this remark fate dealt her another huge blow when her son was killed in an accident in the summer of 1981. He was 14 years old. Despite this loss Romy Schneider started shooting another film. In The Passerby of Sans-Souci she showed her brilliance as an actress one last time. Romy died shortly after the completion of the shooting. She survived her son by one year.
The film world remembers Romy Schneider as a great actress. Around 25 million people worldwide have viewed the Sissi trilogy alone, which commercially ranks among the most successful German-language films of all time. This legacy, however, was a heavy burden for Romy, one she carried since the beginning of her career. She also had private problems and was dealt some heavy blows by fate. She was never really happy; her life was never fulfilled, stable or even consistent. One consistency, however, has emerged 30 years after her death: The myth of Romy Schneider shows no sign of waning."



(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Romy3.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/romy%20dkw2_2.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/romy-dkw-farbe-1957_1.jpg)
(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Romy5.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on February 28, 2017, 06:21:52 pm
The DKW 3=6 family - the first production car to use Polyurethane suspension components?

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/11218251_889932754406042_3703636515534145898_o.jpg)

Some time ago, I re-read an article published in New Zealand Classic Driver magazine in 2011, about the Auto Union 1000S, that contained the line - " You could never say that this was a landmark car in any way".

Well!  I protest!  I think it's very important to understand the design lineage of these cars properly, in order to put them into perspective properly in the era that they were designed in - the 1000S should be seen as a member of its family, not on its own, in my opinion. We need to draw the line all the way back to 1939 and consider what this car was at that time - and again, in my humble opinion the DKW F9 was remarkable for its day.  Yes.  I've said it. It was a landmark car in many ways.  Many people forget or do not know, for example, that Duroplast was first used in an automotive application by Auto Union in 1938, and not, as commonly thought, devised in post war communist Eastern Europe  (Wikipedia, I am looking you!)!  Photographs of Auto Union's pre-war Duroplast body panels may be seen here on Paul Markham's excellent blog:
http://heinkelscooter.blogspot.co.nz/2012/12/1939-dkw-f9-prototype.html

Postwar, the F9's offspring (as it were), the F89 and later F91, 93,94,95, 1000 etc.. were less remarkable in some ways (the body was steel for example).  However they did contain something new and very revolutionary, which, although not headline news at the time, changed the world in few years.  This thing was called Vulkollan. Vulkollan was/is a polyurethane product - known today as "The King of Urethanes". 

Polyurethane was invented in 1937 by Otto Bayer (unrelated to the Bayers of Bayer AG)-  or more correctly, Otto Bayer was head of the research group that, in 1937, discovered the polyaddition for the synthesis of polyurethanes out of polyisocyanate and polyol.  This was under the umbrella of the German company IG Farben. A major breakthrough in the commercial application of polyurethane did not occur until 1941, when a trace of moisture reacted with isocyanate to produce carbon dioxide. The production of this gas resulted in many small empty areas, or cells, in the product (which was subsequently called “imitation Swiss cheese”). As early as 1943, some military uses were made of the product - but it wasn't until the early 1950's that the product was refined into a new solid medium called "Vulkollan".  IG Farben had been liquidated in 1952 and on Bayer AG regaining its independence as a company, they immediately pressed ahead with "Vulkollan".  Bayer themselves have never manufactured Vulkollan, and in the early 1950's granted several licences for its production, finally trademarking it in July 1955.


 The solid polyurethane elastomer that is "Vulkollan" is very popular, still – due to its substantial mechanic and dynamic material characteristics. The main components of Vulkollan consist of a polyesterpolyol and a diisocyanate.  Special cross-linking agents are individually added to obtain the required material characteristics.

Vulkollan is especially popular in the manufacture of wheels. Sectors of major use of Vulkollan wheels include:general industrial wheels (forklift wheels as one example), bottling, mechanical industry, automatic and packaging machines, labelling systems, wire-guided conveyor systems, AGV systems, airports, paper, ceramics, cement mixing, heavy-load wheels for refuse compacters, foundries, glass working machinery, etc..

OK - so where did DKW start with Vulkollan?  Well, the answer lies in another Auto Union invention - the so-called "Schwebeachse" or floating axle, used on DKW's from 1932 (invented by J Rasmussen himself).   This design consisted of a rigid axle with two trailing arms, an overhead transverse leaf spring, the transverse leaf spring is connected to the arms of the axle body at the level of the center of gravity of the vehicle; One end of the spring  uses an "eye" as a fixed bearing , the other end rests in a sliding block ( as a floating bearing). The center of the spring is attached to the chassis.  Here's what it looks like;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/rahmen.jpg)

This is the sliding end on the right hand side of the car:

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10407106_477843479040360_8702519711479331833_n.jpg)


In 1955 the traditional DKW Schwebeachse was adapted to use a Vulkollan shoe on its floating or sliding end - on the right hand side of the spring. This is the first documented production automotive use of Vulkollan.  From 1955 DKW even made kits available to retrofit earlier cars with Vulkollan shoes, so successful was the innovation.  The combination of the Schwebeachse and the Vulkollan shoe, of course, were a very large contributor to the DKW 3=6 family of car's legendary handling.

Here is the early incarnation:

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Sliding%20Shoe.jpg)

Here is the version incorporating the Vulkollan shoe, released in 1955:

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/Vulkollan%20shoe.jpg)

The Schwebeachse at work;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/10960251_1564572863827801_4109768319233596230_o_1.jpg)

For the sake of completeness - I should add that Auto Union also used Vulkollan in the steering box bushes of its cars, and as with the suspension components, with excellent effect. As for the Schwebeachse, it continued in use on cars such as Wartburg 311 (ending production in 1965)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 06, 2017, 03:09:44 pm
Brit and Euro Classic Car Show - Auckland, 5 March 2017

Once again, a very enjoyable show - two Auto Unions were displayed, the VASK contingent once again fielded a stunning quattro!;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/17038593_636909869767043_2937634901803114551_o.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_9756.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_9850.jpg)
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 06, 2017, 05:12:41 pm
Cool looking 1957 DKW 3=6 "Rat"

Just ran across this cool looking '57 DKW 3=6 F93 in RHD on a South African classified site;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1007957478_1_1000x700_dkw-36-sonderklasse-suicide-doors-vanderbijlpark_rev007.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1007957478_2_1000x700_dkw-36-sonderklasse-suicide-doors-add-some-photos_rev007.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/1007957478_3_1000x700_dkw-36-sonderklasse-suicide-doors-other_rev007.jpg)

As a marque purist, I have to point out the chrome accent on the grille and the 1000S tail lights are not correct for the '57 model year - but as a patina'd original example I think it's really cool - the original roof rack really adds some character.  If I did not already have a '57 F93, this one would be on my shopping list.  The paint is original, the badging is all there and correct - you just don't find them like this anymore!

Maybe one of you are looking for something like this.

Here is the ad:

https://www.olx.co.za/ad/dkw-36-sonderklasse-suicide-doors-ID16dj23.html
Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 07, 2017, 04:31:45 pm
Rent a 1938 DKW F7?

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/auto-union-dkw-f7-cabriolet-cape-town-3.jpg)


Yes, you can rent a pre-war DKW somewhere in the world. In sunny Cape Town, in fact!

Sadly, there is only one pre-war DKW in New Zealand, a 1931 DKW F1 belonging to Hans Compter in Whangarei.


 - see here for the rental:  https://www.bookaclassic.co.za/auto-union-dkw-f7-cabriolet-cape-town/


Title: Re: Auto Union DKW Owners
Post by: AutoUnioNZ on March 24, 2017, 05:44:41 pm
This last weekend, I drove our 1959 Auto Union 1000 on a lovely weekend away on a two day event called the Coromandel Gold Rush & Gumdiggers Charity Cruise, in the Coromandel, which involves a roughly 400km trip (for us). We had a great time, especially with our friends, the Farmer's from Whitianga in their NZ-New blue 1958 DKW 3=6 F94;

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0330.jpg)

It was a warm weekend!  The Deek's temperature gauge stayed in the upper ranges :-)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0044%20-%20Copy.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0065.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0070.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0089.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0156.jpg)

This lovely Beetle was with us

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0165.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0305.jpg)

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0311.jpg)

Great condition NSU spotted in Tairua

(http://i752.photobucket.com/albums/xx165/GooneybirdSA/IMG_0314.jpg)